Married to the Military


#1

A coworker was wondering whether a foreigner marrying a xia jie had to serve in the Taiwanese military or not. I thought it unlikely (I would be in the brig for my tenure simply cuz I couldn’t understand what I was being ordered to do), but I did ask my g/f and she sez that of course, as long as you have a Taiwanese citizenship card, you must serve…

I still don’t believe her, so I would like to know what the combined knowledge of this community has to say on the subject…

Peace


#2

[quote=“Toe Save”]A coworker was wondering whether a foreigner marrying a xia jie had to serve in the Taiwanese military or not. I thought it unlikely (I would be in the brig for my tenure simply cuz I couldn’t understand what I was being ordered to do), but I did ask my g/f and she sez that of course, as long as you have a Taiwanese citizenship card, you must serve…

I still don’t believe her, so I would like to know what the combined knowledge of this community has to say on the subject…

Peace[/quote]

I assume you mean “woman” when you say “xia jie” here from the context. Why would marriage require military service? Marriage doesn’t guarantee an ID card. It just means you have the right to apply for one. If you do get one, you may have to serve military service if you’re of draft age.

Seems odd anyone would want to emigrate here without at least knowing the language, though.


#3

[quote=“Toe Save”]A coworker was wondering whether a foreigner marrying a xia jie had to serve in the Taiwanese military or not. I thought it unlikely (I would be in the brig for my tenure simply cuz I couldn’t understand what I was being ordered to do), but I did ask my g/f and she sez that of course, as long as you have a Taiwanese citizenship card, you must serve…

I still don’t believe her, so I would like to know what the combined knowledge of this community has to say on the subject…

Peace[/quote]

Well, only if you gain Taiwanese nationality. Most foreigners married to locals don’t.


#4

Wow…who peed in your Wheaties this morning…unlike most people here, I use the term Xia Jie with respect…as for not learning Mandarin…do you think I live in a bubble…of course I am trying and am quite proud of the smattering of Mandarin that I can speak…but is it sufficient enough for me to comprehend a drill sergeant…definitely not…at least not yet.


#5

The key here is the citizienship. If you are not a Taiwanese citizen then you won’t need to join the military service.
Getting married to a local doesn’t mean you automatically get the citizenship.

BTW: I think it’s Xiao Jie …


#6

I must say, I am flabbergasted. I can’t even think of anything to write. I totally thought this to be urban-legend at best…I guess it would be a really great way for me to learn Mandarin, but what would they do with me…I am going on 42 yrs of age and although I was once a fair athlete, I now get tired when my nose runs. I grunt tying up my shoes. Do they even have scenario projections for the life expectancyof a middle aged fat white boy defending the beaches of democracy?

On the other hand, I was pretty good at paintball… :smiling_imp:


#7

Well, I am not serving in the military yet!
I don’t intend to serve in the military!
My chances of getting citizenship are not great since NO WESTERN foreigner has citizenship here.
I wouldn’t want citizenship if it meant serving in the military or giving up my own citizenship.
Who REALLY wants to be a citizen here anyway???
I would settle for permanent residence - no medical checks - and almost all the other benefits of citizenship - apart from the military service - Let’s save that little gem for Jason Lin.


#8

I know of several people with western passports who are ROC citizens. Or do you mean WHITE foreigner? I know of a couple. Or maybe you’re saying that you can’t be a foreigner if you’ve got citizenship, in which case ,um, :unamused:


#9

If you’re 42, wait a few years and you’ll be too old, if you’re not too old already (not sure whether it’s 40 or 45). You might be too fat as well (some guys used to get fat on purpose to get out of having to serve.)

I did it in my middish-twenties, and it was hard enough then. I understand it’s a lot easier nowadays, though, especially if you can get one of those new “public service” positions or help out at some English-related post.

And about the NO WESTERNER bit, I beg to differ.

[quote=“Toe Save”]I must say, I am flabbergasted. I can’t even think of anything to write. I totally thought this to be urban-legend at best…I guess it would be a really great way for me to learn Mandarin, but what would they do with me…I am going on 42 yrs of age and although I was once a fair athlete, I now get tired when my nose runs. I grunt tying up my shoes. Do they even have scenario projections for the life expectancyof a middle aged fat white boy defending the beaches of democracy?

On the other hand, I was pretty good at paintball… :smiling_imp:[/quote]


#10

I think you can also do some social or public service instead, can’t you?
Met a guy at the new airport in Matsu who works for the tourist information there, claiming that this was his national service.

Of course Matsu isn’t the place you want to do your public service, but if you join the national service you might end up there, too …


#11

I know of several people with western passports who are ROC citizens. Or do you mean WHITE foreigner? I know of a couple. Or maybe you’re saying that you can’t be a foreigner if you’ve got citizenship, in which case ,um, :unamused:[/quote]

Picky, picky, picky!!!
I think we all know what I meant!
I just didn’t want to divide things up into the white - not white thing! So I wrote WESTERN to try a give a hint as to what I meant - that is someone of NON-Chinese decent.
Hartzel I am sure knows exactly what I mean. Perhaps you should take a look at his web site eh :wink:
Yeah, my son is a foreigner and Taiwanese, oh wait, he’s not a foreigner, he was born here - oh, wait a minute - if he doesn’t want to be in the army he is a foreigner. :unamused:
Taiwan is way tooooooooooo complicated :smiling_imp:


#12

Not much to gain from Taiwanese citizenship. I mean, who wants to actually vote here? But it would be nice to be able to get a citizenship or a permanent residency without too many strings attached after say 5-8 years of residence. Fat chance of that happening soon, though.

As long as you are not considered a citizen, you don’t need to worry about a stint in the army.


#13

[quote=“Boss Hogg”]My chances of getting citizenship are not great since NO WESTERN foreigner has citizenship here.

Picky, picky, picky!!!
I think we all know what I meant!
I just didn’t want to divide things up into the white - not white thing! So I wrote WESTERN to try a give a hint as to what I meant - that is someone of NON-Chinese decent.[/quote]

I’m of non-Chinese descent, (quite white actually) and while being from America I’m considered a Westerner, there are plenty of foreigners of non-Chinese descent who are neither from the west nor Caucasian.

Either way, your statement was inaccurate. :slight_smile:

And whoever keeps peeing in my Wheaties, cut it out!


#14

[quote=“Poagao”][quote=“Boss Hogg”]My chances of getting citizenship are not great since NO WESTERN foreigner has citizenship here.

Picky, picky, picky!!!
I think we all know what I meant!
I just didn’t want to divide things up into the white - not white thing! So I wrote WESTERN to try a give a hint as to what I meant - that is someone of NON-Chinese decent.[/quote]

I’m of non-Chinese descent, (quite white actually) and while being from America I’m considered a Westerner, there are plenty of foreigners of non-Chinese descent who are neither from the west nor Caucasian.

Either way, your statement was inaccurate. :slight_smile:

And whoever keeps peeing in my Wheaties, cut it out![/quote]

My statement was inaccurate?
Are you a citizen of Taiwan?
If you are not a citizen of Taiwan then my statement is accurate.
If you are a citizen of Taiwan then please tell Hartzel because I am sure that you would be the first WHITE AMERICAN citizen of Taiwan.

I am peeing in your wheaties!
And crapping in your coffee!


#15

Yes.
Yes.
It is.
I think Hartzell knows, and I am not the first. Might be the first to have served in the military, but I have no idea if that’s the case really.
Stop it.
I don’t drink coffee.


#16

[quote=“Poagao”][quote=“Boss Hogg”]
My statement was inaccurate?
Are you a citizen of Taiwan?
If you are not a citizen of Taiwan then my statement is accurate.
If you are a citizen of Taiwan then please tell Hartzel because I am sure that you would be the first WHITE AMERICAN citizen of Taiwan.
I am peeing in your wheaties!
And crapping in your coffee!
[/quote]

Yes.
Yes.
It is.
I think Hartzell knows, and I am not the first. Might be the first to have served in the military, but I have no idea if that’s the case really.
Stop it.
I don’t drink coffee.[/quote]

Are you really trying to tell me that you served in the military in Taiwan?

Are you nuts?

If so, why?


#17

Boss Hogg, try and keep up. Hint:
[color=white]He’s Taiwanese[/color]


#18

Boss Hogg, try and keep up. Hint: [color=white]He’s Taiwanese[/color][/quote]

I find it very difficult to believe!
Do you have proof?


#19

what, like binglang stains on his shoes? I know, get him to say “fried rice”


#20

Boss Hogg, Click here for edification. :sunglasses: