Married to the Military

When god was handing out heads Boss Hogg thought he said "beds’ and asked for a soft one!!

How the $#@@ was I supposed to know - everyone - (well let us say the Hartzel site and others) leads “us” to believe that there are no white Taiwanese and that it is impossible to gain citizenship - I thought that was what “the cause” was fighting for, along with equal rights.
Therefore I can not be blamed for not believing this stuff.
BUT I believe it now and I am profoundly sorry for my ignorance, I guess I am not part of the group that keeps tabs on all the little things like links to newspapers and stuff like that. Perhaps I don’t care - I do care - I just couldn’t possibly know that.

Proven wrong :blush:
That is ok

So, it was by adoption… hmmm…
So, I could do it then…
but $hit I don’t want to do any service and I am diabetic too.

I wonder if I could get out of doing the service bit since I am diabetic???

Yes, I was drafted.

I don’t think so.

See above.

Seriously, I don’t know if you can get out of the service for being diabetic. I do know you have to be of adoptable age to be adopted, but being married to a Taiwanese citizen makes you just as eligible as being adopted. You’d think they’d assign so-called “foreigners” to cushy English-related office jobs, but no such options were made available to me and I was posted to an ordinary base. Perhaps things are different now, though.

Should we tell him about the toilets?

Damn it… I am not adoptable.
Now, getting citizenship because of marriage. hmmmm
I still don’t want to serve.

I am going to take that article about Poagao serving in the army to class tonight and show my students.

Man, I think they will find it as hard to believe as I did.

You have got guts.
I wish I had the nerve to do it.
But I like earning money too much to even consider it.

Your Chinese must be perfect.

Just when you think you know all there is to know about foreigners living in Taiwan someone makes an idiot out of you. Actually, make an idiot of yourself. Misinformed or mislead - I stand corrected. :blush:

Ok, I showed my students the article about Lin Dao Ming, the first “American” now Taiwanese in the Taiwanese Army.

The comments below are not my own.

I was met with disbelief and a massive array of questions and comments that I did not have the answers to and even if I did it would be none of their business.
Comments and questions as follows…
“He must have a mental problem - does he?”
“Why would anyone want to become Taiwanese, so many Taiwanese want to be American and he wants to be Taiwanese - strange”.
“Wow, but why did he leave America?”
“Was he not successful in America?”
“Would he want to do it all over again if he had the chance?”

[b]The conclusion that I have drawn is that I don’t read the newspaper enough to be able to keep up to date with what is happening in Taiwan. Segue really keeps me up to date but in this case way behind the times.

However, I think that most foreigners in Taiwan could be forgiven for believing, as I did, that no foreigners have become citizens of Taiwan or served in the military.

Most of the talk around the expat sites about Taiwan all talk about this being an challenge that is at the moment impossible to achieve. So, as misinformed as my statements were I think that it is easy to understand how one could make such an error.

A Foreigner being adopted by a Taiwanese family is something that really takes me by surprise, especially when the foreigner is an adult.

My question is this - Can he get his US citizenship back and keep both?[/b]

Boss Hogg, try and keep up. Hint:
[color=white]He’s Taiwanese[/color]
[/quote]

Oh yeah I got the hint … but my meaning was
Why would you make the choice to become Taiwanese if you knew that there was a chance that you would have to serve in the military?

Clear enough!?

Hell, I just showed the Taipei Times article to another foreigner and he said “ridiculous”.

Well, the Poagao is crazy is a normal reaction here. Most people I have told the story to have had that reaction.

[quote=“Boss Hogg’s Students”]He must have a mental problem - does he?
Why would anyone want to become Taiwanese, so many Taiwanese want to be American and he wants to be Taiwanese - strange.
Wow, but why did he leave America?
Was he not successful in America?
Would he want to do it all over again if he had the chance?[/quote]
All indicative of a national inferiority complex. :frowning: Some people here aren’t even aware of the value of their own culture/society/history. :expressionless: :?

[quote=“Maoman”][quote=“Boss Hogg’s Students”]He must have a mental problem - does he?
Why would anyone want to become Taiwanese, so many Taiwanese want to be American and he wants to be Taiwanese - strange.
Wow, but why did he leave America?
Was he not successful in America?
Would he want to do it all over again if he had the chance?[/quote]
All indicative of a national inferiority complex. :frowning: Some people here aren’t even aware of the value of their own culture/society/history. :expressionless: :?[/quote]

Ok, would you do it?

I sure as hell hope that immigrants to Canada don’t have your attitude, B.H. They’d be pretty freakin’ useless in a time of national crisis. :? Maybe Poagao felt that the privilege of citizenship was worth the price of duty and responsibility to his adopted nation.

If you become a citizen here, you get a few obligations - you better bear it with a smile. Please note that you will have to provide proof that you have renounced your original citizenship. Do you want to trade your NZ passport for a Taiwanese one?

I would think very hard about that before doing it.

I sure as hell hope that immigrants to Canada don’t have your attitude, B.H. They’d be pretty freakin’ useless in a time of national crisis. :? Maybe Poagao felt that the privilege of citizenship was worth the price of duty and responsibility to his adopted nation.[/quote]

Oh no!! I never said that was my attitude!
Just a question… Your answer shows why you think he did it, but other people have different reasons!

If I had to I’d fight for Taiwan - well not for “Taiwan” but in Taiwan for my Taiwanese family. But to give up my citizenship - NO WAY!

Just a question NOT an opinion.

[quote=“Mr He”]If you become a citizen here, you get a few obligations - you better bear it with a smile. Please note that you will have to provide proof that you have renounced your original citizenship. Do you want to trade your NZ passport for a Taiwanese one?

I would think very hard about that before doing it.[/quote]

I would NEVER do it - My country doesn’t require any of the garbage that Taiwan does.

So, fight for my Taiwanese family - Hell YES
Fight for the Taiwanese Government - Now that’s a joke

Become a citizen of the R.O.C.? You can count on it. Especially since Canada automatically returns citizenship to anyone who was previously a citizen. I am however something of a hypocrite, because I have passed the age of which I feel I would be of any value as a conscript. I also have responsibility to family and business partners that I did not have when I was 21 and first on this island. Had I been eligible at that point, I would have been first in line. I’m just shy of 36 now, and I don’t have the luxury of time that I did 15 years ago. If there was any way I could join the reserves and participate in occasional training camps as a way of fulfilling my citizenship duties, I would do it in a heartbeat. As it stands, I probably won’t apply for citizenship until I have children here, and by then I’ll probably be past the age for military service. I’m not particularly proud of my attitude, however. :blush: I do admire Poagao for having the courage of his convictions. :slight_smile: A rare quality in people nowadays, I’m afraid.

I do admire Poagao for having the courage of his convictions. :slight_smile: A rare quality in people nowadays, I’m afraid.[/quote]

Good point

Did he really expect to serve? I mean REALLY??!!

If so, then he has balls of steel.

If NZ had the same deal as Canada I would do it too, but when I am much older - too old to be useful. It would make life easier and that is the only reason.

I second both of these sentiments.

I could renounce my Brit citizenship if I wanted to, then take ROC citizenship, then immediately get my UK citizenship, because the Brit government still officially declares anyone renouncing UK citizenship to have “temporarily taken leave of their senses” which I think is just soooooo cute! Taiwan law only says you have to renounce your citizenship in order to get an ROC passport. It says nothing about what you do AFTER you have ROC citizenship except if you’re a high-ranking member of the government or something.

I second both of these sentiments.[/quote]

And so do I!! I don’t want to take anything away from the guy or his accomplishments. I do think that it raises some interesting questions and issues.
Does it set a precedent for the rest of us who would like to follow in the future and become Taiwanese?
Can all foreigners who wish to become citizens really be expected to serve - let’s say that a foreigner can’t speak chinese, will they throw him in the deep end too?
Should we expect to be treated any differently anyway?
Should service be compulsory in our own countries?

There was no way out was there?
Once you cross that line there is no turning back, oops, sorry, I didn’t really expect to be called up for service, I’d like to change my mind now. Can’t do that now can you? You’re Taiwanese now, like it or lump it. OR IS THERE really a way to get out of it?