MBA program at NTU

Hello everyone,

I am a U.S. national with taiwanese tie (born in Taiwan; moved to the states after elementary school). I recently was accepted into the NTU’s MBA program.

My question is what are my job prospects in Taiwan or other asian countries post MBA. I am fluent in conversational chinese, can read at a decent level, but not write. I have 8.5 years of U.S. working experience at a U.S. commercial bank.

Ideally, I would like to find a position within a global firm working in other business areas. However, I am concerned about the local job market and my ability to find a desired position due to my lack of writing fluency in Chinese and that I am not a permanent resident of Taiwan. I am also concerned about the overflowing of people with local and foreign MBAs, competing for the same positions.

Also, what is a realistic salary expectation for a NTU MBA post graduation, and is this enough to make it on your own in Taiwan with some money saved up on the side.

p.s. I will likely boost my chinese skill during my studies at NTU.

What part of the US are you coming from?
And what non-commercial banking industries are you interested?

If I were coming from New York, Boston or Chicago, I would expect comparable commercial banking salaries for a mid-level employee in Taipei to be about 20%-30% what you should be making there - something on the order of US$ 30,000 to 50,000 a year. Sure, the taxes here are lower and the cost of living should be lower, too. Can you make it on your own on that? Without question - if you are single. But you aren’t going to be pulling in close to what you can in the US.

Now, are you bringing family along? You can make a better case for cost savings that way. But your spouse should work. Do you have family here you can stay with? This will help with your daily living expenses, and maybe present business or career opportunities for you. And you should be thinking of what things you will be doing on the side over here - family, investments, community, other academics

What part of the US are you coming from? – California
And what non-commercial banking industries are you interested – consulting, investments, corporate finance.

I am single and also have an extensive family in Taiwan. I really like Taiwan and believe it will be a personally enriching experience living there. However, the job market, no fluency in written mandarin, and the need for a company sponsored work visa concern me.

Thus, I am not overly confident yet that this will be the right move. I am also concerned of my ability to find a good paying job in the U.S. if things didn’t work out in Taiwan post NTU MBA.

I think this is the key thing - whether you do the MBA or not. It’s all well and good to say a commercial banker makes X in Taipei and 5X in the US, but is that 5X job available to you in the first place? And while you are spending time trying to land it in the US, you are facing higher living costs while being under-employed, which doesn’t necessarily enhance your chances of getting the 5X job.

I found this recent post relevant: forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 0#p1530260

And if you’ll pardon some unsolicited advice, when you are doing your MBA, make damn sure all of your professors know who you are for all the right reasons. I’m not saying kiss their ass (although that won’t hurt for some of them), but stand out as a useful contributing part of the program. You may not need their recommendations for further studies, but if any one of them points you to a meaningful job lead, consulting gig, or business opportunity, you will probably consider the degree worth it.

IMO this applies for job hunting in Taiwan (as it does anywhere else)
[slideshare]congratsgraduate-130603130029-phpapp01[/slideshare]
Here is a link to the presentation (it worked in Preview :blush: )
Congratulations, Graduate! 11 Reasons Why I Will Never Hire You
slideshare.net/markrotoole/c … r-hire-you

I’ve been checking on this as well, since im interested in attending either NTU or NSYSU for the MBA.
General consensus here is that you’re better off with an MBA from other country if your planning to work in the US. If you’re planning on trying luck in TW maybe an MBA from NTU will help get your feet wet and give you a perspective.

Thanks for the feedback.

Does the NTU MBA add value in working in H.K. or Singapore?
how realistic is it for a foreigner to get visa sponsorship to work in Taiwan? and what’s the average salary for MBA graduates out of NTU?

Find the links to the NTU MBA Alumni Associations in those cities and post them here. LinkedIn might help

Are you really asking this question? Have you looked around this website? Plenty of foreigners here on proper visas. Maybe even most of us.

Ask the school and let us know

You have already been accepted into the program and you do NOT know the answers to these questions? This is a bad sign - you have a lot of work ahead of you

General consensus seems to be that Singaporian and HK schools add more value than NTU in these areas.

I have looked around the forum extensively and some job postings. Consensus seems to be prefer to not or do not give work visas if there is no differentiator between foreigner and locals in the financial services industry.

The school did not have salary information available.

I am doing the work now before deciding whether to attend the school in the fall.

Just want to make sure you know this because you asked them for it (you didn’t just browse their website). It would not surprise me if they do not have a great career placement office (they might - I’ve never checked). But those are the kind of people who would know

Ingratiate yourself with some headhunters in the region and start looking out for this kind of information. Also, Google “Hewitt Asia” and review their salary surveys. You can compare salary levels in different industries between HK, Sing, Shanghai, Beijing, Taiwan. Guess who comes out at the bottom?

Use LinkedIn to track down alumni in your area (should be at least a few on the West Coast) and elsewhere. If they are doing well, they will be happy to brag to you about it.

Google and use LinkedIn and Facebook to look for their alumni clubs. New grads from my B-school contact me at least once a month or so for some random question. If I have time, I am willing to share it with them. If I have time. The same should be true of others

[quote=“hitormiss”]General consensus seems to be that Singaporian and HK schools add more value than NTU in these areas.

I have looked around the forum extensively and some job postings. Consensus seems to be prefer to not or do not give work visas if there is no differentiator between foreigner and locals in the financial services industry.

The school did not have salary information available.

I am doing the work now before deciding whether to attend the school in the fall.[/quote]

I can’t comment on the specific program per se, but I do know of a few people that are currently in it. To be 100% honest, I’m not sure what they will be doing once they graduate with that specific MBA education, but the program seems pretty fun and also not terribly challenging. The work visas and finding professional work after graduation is a big concern, and I’m not really sure how this specific MBA program would really make you more marketable in Taiwanese industries.

Quite a few of the people that are doing the program do not know Chinese fluently. I would have thought knowing the Chinese language would be a quintessential skill to have if getting an MBA from NTU (because you could use that education in China or HK if need be). I’m really curious myself as to what opportunities that program will lead for graduates, I’m sure there are a few things that the education received there could really help in.

As for Taiwanese salaries, they are pretty low and I don’t think they will be moving up anytime soon. For a lot of us that visit this forum, we either love Taiwan a lot to the point that somewhat low salaries are not too important for us or we focus on the Purchasing Price Parity. Either way, it puts a lot of us in tough situations because we love the country but find it difficult to accept and hold on to the “TAiwanese dream”.

This sums it up pretty much!
I do believe that if you take an MBA program in the wan you pretty much need to know what are you aiming for from the very start. I also agree on the language part, might not be mandatory for the course, but yes for work.

This sums it up pretty much!
I do believe that if you take an MBA program in the wan you pretty much need to know what are you aiming for from the very start. I also agree on the language part, might not be mandatory for the course, but yes for work.[/quote]
I believe this I true of going to MBA whatever country it’s in. I know many people – dynamic, highly capable, great people – who are lost once they FINISH the program. Sure, they got in because they are amazing individuals, but if they are no further along to any particular goal, then what do you have? 1-2 years along and back at Square 1 - and no matter how fancy the degree, no ones hiring anywhere

thank you all for the invaluable feedback. I ultimately think it is a) the opportunity to have fun for 2 years, reconnect with family and make some contacts with the potential it might open some doors along with my existing experience, skill set, and dual cultural understandings, but b) a good job is certainly not a guarantee with the degree even in Taiwan, and I could be further along if I pursue the work option.

This sums it up pretty much!
I do believe that if you take an MBA program in the wan you pretty much need to know what are you aiming for from the very start. I also agree on the language part, might not be mandatory for the course, but yes for work.[/quote]
I believe this I true of going to MBA whatever country it’s in. I know many people – dynamic, highly capable, great people – who are lost once they FINISH the program. Sure, they got in because they are amazing individuals, but if they are no further along to any particular goal, then what do you have? 1-2 years along and back at Square 1 - and no matter how fancy the degree, no ones hiring anywhere[/quote]

In my experience no degree guarantees employment, usually MBA is often overlooked nowadays, but if you have it work for you and build you up (no really!) instead of just it being a paper on the wall, you get a better chance. I know that kind of people too, smart, capable, but damn did they overlook strategy… I have still not tackled MBA for this sole reason, I am trying to find what is gonna happen to good ol me.

So, in the end did you choose to go do the MBA program?

I agree with several comments above. I don’t want to be rude, but I really don’t understand the motivation of people wanting to complete a MBA. I also have seen plenty of decent people having recently graduated and they have been looking for a job for months and all of them still haven’t found anything. One has completed her degree at Waseda University, a top school in Japan. I would assume it is better than NTU, and yet she still complains she can’t find work anywhere. She is fluent in Chinese, Japanese and English.

And by the way, are these economic and marketing classes going to make you a better manager? I doubt the formation itself is highly relevant. The real value of a MBA is the opportunity to make strategic connections for two years, that’s why it’s important to pick a top school. If you graduate from a MBA and haven’t yet a job lined up, then you have failed at networking properly and hence have wasted your time.

[quote=“MyOnlyFriend”]I agree with several comments above. I don’t want to be rude, but I really don’t understand the motivation of people wanting to complete a MBA. I also have seen plenty of decent people having recently graduated and they have been looking for a job for months and all of them still haven’t found anything. One has completed her degree at Waseda University, a top school in Japan. I would assume it is better than NTU, and yet she still complains she can’t find work anywhere. She is fluent in Chinese, Japanese and English.

And by the way, are these economic and marketing classes going to make you a better manager? I doubt the formation itself is highly relevant. The real value of a MBA is the opportunity to make strategic connections for two years, that’s why it’s important to pick a top school. If you graduate from a MBA and haven’t yet a job lined up, then you have failed at networking properly and hence have wasted your time.[/quote]

If your friend is looking for a job in Japan, being fluent in Chinese and English might be irrelevant for most positions.

Anyway I don’t think it’s true that a job is automatically waiting for you if you network properly. It depends on your degree, experience you have so far, and many other factors. Or you might just be unlucky and the networking you did doesn’t lead anywhere.

Also, people have to accept they might not get the job they are hoping for right after their MBA. Some people complain they can’t find work, but in reality they are too picky and are unwilling to accept a job that isn’t at least as good as the previous one.

They might, they might not. The true fact is that Master’s classes are more applied to reality than regular college classes which are more theorical. Not saying you’re wrong, on the contrary networking during MBA is amazing, but some of us want it just for the self-improvement. OH! and in some countries it is a requirement to climb the corporate ladder.