Meteorite explotes over central Russia 900 hurt

Meteorite explotes over central Russia 900 hurt.

2012 DA14 asteroid is passing by earth tonight/this morning, it should be able to been seen with binoculars from the southwest around 3:30am to the west/northwest around 6:00am

guardian.co.uk/science/acros … -2012-da14

That video… its really crazy, it lights up some places like a huge flare… it’s beautiful to watch, too bad it’s a natural disaster.

Only 900 hurt?

No one remembers Tunguska.

Still, last two major air bursts were both [strike]in winter,[/strike] in Russia and about 100 years apart. Spooky, hey?

EDIT: I was wrong, Tunguska was in summer (June 8, 1908).

[quote=“urodacus”]Only 900 hurt?
No one remembers Tunguska.
Still , last two major air bursts were both in winter, in Russia and about 100 years apart. Spooky, hey?[/quote]

well russia is HUGE, if you ask me my predictions, meteorites are most likely to hit russia, africa or china.
Imma wiki Tunguska to find out what you are talking about

Siberia itself is massive, let alone Russia.

[quote=“urodacus”]Only 900 hurt?

No one remembers Tunguska.

Still , last two major air bursts were both in winter, in Russia and about 100 years apart. Spooky, hey?[/quote]

Man, I always have in mind that picture with the trees all around Tunguska flattened to the ground, just as if they were blades of grass… O_o

Anyhow, I hiked on top of Taoyuan Valley yesterday and hoped to catch a glimpse of the passing asteroid. The fog was so thick I could barely see my feet :frowning:

Apparently the Russian Meteor was unrelated to the 2012 DA14, what a weird coincidence.
telegraph.co.uk/science/spac … pened.html

I live in Nantou and stayed late to see the Asteroid, nevertheless it was so cloudy that I could even see the stars so I went to bed.

you don’t look like I’d pictured you at all.

Imagine if this happened 30 years ago?
There’d probably be a 10’s of millions of people obliterated by now.

[quote=“Devereaux”]Imagine if this happened 30 years ago?
There’d probably be a 10’s of millions of people obliterated by now.[/quote]

In one of the first report they said “the meteorite was intercepted by an air defense unit”.

But haven’t been mentioned anymore, I mean Russia is capable to do that right?

A ten tonne rock that is bouncing through the atmosphere at supersonic speeds exploding as it goes, I don’t think a missile interceptor is going to have any effect at all.

[quote=“TexMex”][quote=“Devereaux”]Imagine if this happened 30 years ago?
There’d probably be a 10’s of millions of people obliterated by now.[/quote]

In one of the first report they said “the meteorite was intercepted by an air defense unit”.

But haven’t been mentioned anymore, I mean Russia is capable to do that right?[/quote]

Interesting. My guess is “no.” Some info here:

amsmeteors.org/fireballs/faqf/#12

I heard “about the size of a house” which I guess would put it in at least the “more than about 10 ton group”, which they have traveling at 8640km/hour at impact, faster than anti-aircraft missiles. Even if fast enough, or launched from head-on say, I think the small warhead of such a missile, designed to punch holes in aircraft made of thin metal, would be like a party popper against it. The heat might even disintegrate it before it could touch it.

Russia probably still has anti-aircraft missiles with atomic warheads, but I doubt operational to the degree they could likely respond so quickly to such an event, or if it would be a likely idea against something heading out over Siberia.

[quote=“Tempo gain”][quote=“TexMex”]

In one of the first report they said “the meteorite was intercepted by an air defense unit”.

But haven’t been mentioned anymore, I mean Russia is capable to do that right?[/quote]

Interesting. My guess is “no.” Some info here:

amsmeteors.org/fireballs/faqf/#12

I heard “about the size of a house” which I guess would put it in at least the “more than about 10 ton group”, which they have traveling at 8640km/hour at impact, faster than anti-aircraft missiles. Even if fast enough, or launched from head-on say, I think the small warhead of such a missile, designed to punch holes in aircraft made of thin metal, would be like a party popper against it. The heat might even disintegrate it before it could touch it.

Russia probably still has anti-aircraft missiles with atomic warheads, but I doubt operational to the degree they could likely respond so quickly to such an event, or if it would be a likely idea against something heading out over Siberia.[/quote]

You are right, I guess is not like on cartoons, for that to happen they should have known the trajectory and intercept it which would have been still a highly difficult task.

The main point is that a missile interceptor does not have the energy to destroy such a rock. The rock is moving at speeds far in excess of the interceptor, it is not moving completely linearly, it is likely in multiple pieces and due to it’s relatively massive size and speed it’s momentum is unstoppable even if the interceptor could hit one of the targets dead on.

The only remote possibility is that they could break into a few more pieces and the smaller pieces burned up or hit with less impact. But I think it’s pretty unlikely they would ever hit a target moving that fast with so little warning.

I think the important thing here is that it hit in a relatively unpopulated area. I can’t even imagine the damage if it had hit in a major urban area. Of course those are a tiny percentage of the earth’s surface.

It is likely that what they mean by ‘intercepted by air defence’ is a radar intercept. As HH has pointed out air defence missiles would be useless against this thing especially once it is in the atmosphere. Any missle impact would be as about as effective as a bug hitting the windshield of a car moving at highway speeds.

Or they could have scrambled some fighters and locked on to it with anti-missile radar, probably an SOP, but could have been mentioned in case clowns like Zhirinovski wanted to say “What if it had been a new form of missile?”

I am oblivious and astounded as to how come they never saw it coming… specially when all eyes were up in the sky because because of the other f***er up there. It either had to be wicked fast, or we really have no capability of foreseeing asteroid crashes… really…

I am surprised that there have been no news accounts indicating that because of polar warming that the magnetic fields of the earth have changed thus attracting more meteorites and how a new UN panel will be set up to investigate and… taxes will be required to fund research… and … new measures will be taken to fund grants to explore and conduct research to ensure that… :roflmao:

And lest you laugh, early reports on the Asian tsunami of 2004 suggested that the event was linked to global warming. :loco:

That’s because anyone who has the slighthest idea of the structure of our close outer space and massive bodies dynamics knows anything that happens to the outermost, thin-as-s**t layer of our planet (a.k.a. the atmosphere and the oceans) has zero effect on the frequency, severity and predictability of meteorites impacts.