Michelin Guide Taipei 2018


#61

Yes, I do not understand this French and food. Perhaps I do not undertand this fully but in my home of Italy to eat is much superior. The culture of eating in China is of my opinion also superior.


#62

It is a little disappointing to hear this, I was looking forward to having high quality spicy food on tap. I wonder can you recommend any of these exceptions? Especially Sichuan or Hunan style. If you could I really would appreciate that a lot. The Chinese food in Paris is awful, we gave up on it a long time ago, it is marginally above the British style of ‘Chinese’ take away. And the ones that go for higher quality tend to be pretentious rather than authentic. I really will be interested to explore the food in Taipei!


#63

Well, not bad, just not that authentic. I actually don’t mind Taiwanized Sichuan food, but unfortunately all the restaurants I liked in this category have disappeared over the years, mostly moving to the U.S. or Japan. For more authentic stuff, the one below isn’t bad. They’ll make it as spicy as you want it.

I can’t think of any authentic Hunan places, but I like this one, which does kind of a modern fusion version.


#64

Wow, thanks! They both look great. The second link looks amazing. I can gaurantee we are definitely going to eat there, no doubt about that. My wife is going to be stoked - that’s very american of me I know. In Paris its so grim. Actually I like French food, not so much Parisian though, you have to get out into smaller towns to get the good home-style stuff. I agree with that confused Italian Catalan guy, lol!


#65

1010湘 is a mass market chain that serves extremely bastardized (i.e. not spicy) Hunan cuisine, just like Thai Town Cuisine does for Thai food and Kai Fun does for Sichuan food.

If I wanted modern Chinese cuisine, I would probably want to head to this place https://goo.gl/maps/1EJfr99FVT42 where there has been a lot more care and creativity put into the dishes, and where they don’t claim to be something that they’re not.


#66

I said specifically that it’s not authentic, but it’s kind of harsh comparing it to Thai Town, which is terrible.


#67

It looked fine to me. If I am mistaken I guess they just have good photos. I guess we will find out either way.


#68

There is a difference between being inauthentic merely to suit local tastes and inauthentic out of creativity.

For a smaller chain on “Taipei-style” Sichuan food, I would go to Kiki Restaurant. They will make it spicy if you ask them.

Or try 皇城老媽 which has been around for 30 years. The owner is supposed to have invented the original 蒼蠅頭 dish. They make the food there spicy without being asked.


#69

I’d say Pop Hunan falls under the latter, and Thai Town definitely under the former. Then again, I find most Thai food in Taipei inedible.

Kiki isn’t bad.


#70

I like Kai Fun, 1010湘, and Kiki a lot, although admittedly the first two are a little over-priced. I’ve never been to Sichuan or Hunan so I don’t know how authentic they are. Doesn’t matter. I still like them - my only gripe is that none of them suit solitary dining (unless I’ve missed something?). Took the Taiwanese in-laws to Kai Fun for a belated Mother’s Day lunch, and everyone loved it. Sure, I would have liked it spicier, but no one else at the table would have.

Thai Town is acceptable as cheap food court Thai. A pity it’s not cheap.

I don’t see what the big deal is with imagined authenticity. Yeah, I’m curious what things “should” taste like in their original form (which doesn’t really exist, but never mind), and that’s interesting, but a modified version will often be more to my taste. If you go back long enough, potatoes aren’t “authentically” Irish, tomatoes aren’t authentically Italian, chili peppers aren’t authentically Korean.


#71

Yea all those plants were domesticated in the Americas. It is a shocking thought at just how deep globalization goes, those peppers drying on the roads of southern Asia are an early import of Portuguese sailors.


#72

The inimitable Michael Fei visited Le Palais twice to try and fathom how this place managed to receive three stars. His assessment is an awesome read:

Guy


#73

Hong Kong hawker food across from Taipei main train station. Another Singapore restaurant that may not survive. All shops around full even have waiting lines.


Hawker Chan
100, Taipei City, Zhongzheng District, Section 1, Zhongxiao West Road, 36號
https://goo.gl/maps/bTwhE1FJN8S2


Where's the best Malaysian or Singapore food?
#74

The Chinese name of the place is misleading, its actually from Singapore. HK style chicken but from Singapore. Michelin Guide as far as Chinese food is concerned is a total joke, IMO. No credibility at all.


#75

These Michelin stars seem a bit random.


#76

Food is good mostly exactly what you would expect, not Taiwan-eased, yet.


#77

Most of the Michelin stars awarded to Asian restaurants, I felt like I could get some of the dishes better at some mom and pop place I know.


#78

Hawker Chan serves more-than-competent Cantonese BBQ. (The vast majority of places in Taiwan, by contrast, are far below the competent level.) It’s also in a sweet location, on Zhongxiao West Road just across from Taipei Main Station.

The key to enjoying this place is NOT to order the rice (which may be good in Singapore—it is not good here) and instead go with the lo mien option. IIRC, it’s NT$20 more, and it gets you tasty noodles, XO sauce on the side (yay!), and a small side of bitter greens. With the soya sauce chicken, this is a nice light lunch.

Guy


#79

Went back again and empty. It’s right across from Taipei Main, lots of people around but no one goes for the Hong Kong style.


#80

Thanks for posting the menu as well. I guess if I want to try it out, I’d better get there in a hurry.

Does the same chain have a branch in the Taipei 101 food court? I semi-noticed a sign for first hawker stand with a Michelin star, so I guess it’s the same place.