Minkuotang?

Anyone who knows what they are all about? They made news recently by releasing a “Youth Recruitment” video, featuring a very authoritarian vision of “youth”, having them marching at a square.

The party is said to be founded by ex-KMT Hsinchu legislator Hsin-Ying Hsu (徐欣瑩), however, the internet says it spawned off a cult religious group belonging to Chan Master Miao Tian (妙天).

They claim their goal is to end partisanship, but their party flag features the KMT emblem prominently.

They also claim to adhere to Dr. SYS’ principles.

They are recruiting people at college campuses with some what of an religious approach. It’s all very strange. What the heck is the Minkuotang about?

Y’see, whenever people back home ask ‘What’s Asia like?’, this is the sort of thing I show them. Actual teenagers, not rolling on the floor in hilarity when asked to do something that is a cross between the Nuremberg rallies and a Jane Fonda workout video. :roflmao:

Looks interesting, though.

Hadn’t heard about the Miaotian connection. They’re a very new party and I suspect a one-time thing trying to capitalize on the unpopularity of the KMT.

For your consideration:

solidaritytw.tumblr.com/post/114 … nt-revival

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 03614217/1 (see photo caption)

If their official English transliteration of their name is “Minkuotang,” I have no further interest in them already…

So far it’s the only version I’ve seen out there. If we do a non-phonetic translation, what would be the best way to render it? The Republican Party? The Republic of China Party of the Republic of China?

Just make up your own version, like the Taipei Times does with the KMT, whose official English name is the Kuomintang, not “The Chinese Nationalist Party”.

Well KMT has been called The Chinese Nationalist Party in English medias since the 30s.

The Encyclopedia of Britannica lists it as the Nationalist Party.
global.britannica.com/topic/Nati … ical-party

Well KMT has been called The Chinese Nationalist Party in English medias since the 30s.

The Encyclopedia of Britannica lists it as the Nationalist Party.
global.britannica.com/topic/Nati … ical-party[/quote]

This seems to be some kind of cyclical thing:

Are you blind or willfully ignorant? There is no rhetorical purpose for it, there is the simple fact that Kuomintang is the name the party themselves have chosen to use as their English name. It is not up to any outside party to decide what their name is.


As Poagao and I have said repeatedly - who are you, or we, to decide what another party’s name is? Are you trying to say that the Kuomintang are wrong when they say their own name is the Kuomintang in English?[/quote] China Nationalist Party

[quote=“In response back then (2005), when I was using the name xp+10K, I”]Groups often wind up with the names that others give them. It’s highly doubtful that the original Tory party (see blurb) or the original Whig party (see blurb) gave itself that name. In addition, the religious denomination commonly called the Quakers didn’t give themselves the name Quakers (see webpage).

I probably first understood the meaning of the word Nationalists, in reference to the Chinese anti-communists, when I was in elementary school (early to mid-1960s). In World Geography class in junior high, we were made very aware of the term Nationalist in that context and were corrected if we said the phrase “the People’s Republic of China,” which we were told to call “Red China.”

To ignore all the abundant evidence (just type in nationalist or nationalists and kuomintang, kuo min tang, or any of the other variants–one night I stumbled on one or two online copies of, I think, pre-WWII books referring to the Nationalists) in favor of something that doesn’t even rise to the level of proper pedantry, and especially to be so adamantine about it–well, I’ll just say it may take some time for me to understand why anyone would hold such a position and hold it so vehemently.

I don’t often find myself using the adjective Orwellian, but. . . .[/quote] China Nationalist Party

The issue resurfaced in 2010:

The Taipei Times’ name for them seems to have caught on in some circles (I didn’t know the Taipei Times was that old):

Here it comes again in 2015, so here I go again:

[quote]Four hundred members of the great Order of Liberty, [color=#004080]the Chinese nationalist party[/color], celebrated the election of Dr. Sun Yat Sen as president of the baby Chinese republic at a banquet on the second floor of 709 1/2 King st., Sunday night.[/quote]–“Chinese Honor Republic[,] Pledge Fealty to Dr. Sen,” The Seattle Star, April 18, [color=#004080]1921[/color] goo.gl/KNnyI5

[quote]CHINESE LOANS

Loans to Peking now will pro-
long civil war in China. Please
lend no money to kill our
people.

[color=#004080]Kuo Min Tang[/color]
([color=#004080]The Chinese Nationalist Party[/color])
2461 Grant Avenue[/quote]–advertisement, The Ogden Standard-Examiner (Ogden, Utah) , January 30, [color=#004080]1921[/color]
goo.gl/PtPJVr

[quote]Colonel-general Wudan, the local leader of [color=#004080]the Chinese nationalist party[/color], declares Consul Tzs-ang Woohuan’s refusal to identify Chinese residents who wish passports to visit the fair is a lawless procedure.[/quote]–Honolulu Star-Bulletin, April 19, [color=#004080]1915[/color] goo.gl/ZMqt0y

[quote]Governor and Mrs. William Spry broke bread last night with representative Chinese of Salt Lake, the occasion being a diplomatic dinner as part of the campaign of [color=#004080]the Chinese Nationalist party[/color] to have the United States recognize the Chinese republic.[/quote]–“Spry Breaks Bread with Chinese Hosts,” The Evening Standard (Ogden City, Utah), March 29, [color=#004080]1913[/color] goo.gl/tR6dyO

The problem is that there was more than just one Kuomingtang. The original one was established by Song Jiaoren (宋教仁). Song long advocated tht the revolution needs to be initiated at the central provinces of China, instead of Guangdong like SYS insisted. It was his group working at Hubei and Hunan that pushed the successful revolution at Hunan. Song is also highly against SYS’ radicalism.

The original one was just called Kuomingtang (國民黨), without the “Chinese” part. SYS later renamed his own Chinese Revolution Party (中國革命黨) to Chinese Kuomingtang (中國國民黨), and that’s why it’s always referred to as the Chinese Nationalist Party in full.

[quote=“hansioux”]The problem is that there was more than just one Kuomingtang. The original one was established by Song Jiaoren (宋教仁). Song long advocated tht the revolution needs to be initiated at the central provinces of China, instead of Guangdong like SYS insisted. It was his group working at Hubei and Hunan that pushed the successful revolution at Hunan. Song is also highly against SYS’ radicalism.

The original one was just called Kuomingtang (國民黨), without the “Chinese” part. SYS later renamed his own Chinese Revolution Party (中國革命黨) to Chinese Kuomingtang (中國國民黨), and that’s why it’s always referred to as the Chinese Nationalist Party in full.[/quote]

Thanks for the historical info, hansioux. :thumbsup: