Mistaken admission stamp in passport (!)

I’m from the United States and used to teach in South Korea. I am currently in Taiwan considering finding long-term teaching work. I have a multiple entry visitor visa that is good through 2017. I just had a look in my passport, and a bit to my shock and frustration, I see that the man working at immigrations at the airport stamped my passport with 30-day visa except admission.

He did not ask me how long I planned to stay in Taiwan, and I certainly never told him under 30 days.

Has this ever happened to you? Did the NIA acknowledge the mistake and rectify the situation?

Never seen that happen before. I would go check with the NIA if I were you.

Unlike the US immigration agent who can authorize UP TO 90 days at his sole discretion, Taiwan Immigration agents do not , far as I know , authorize certain days. If you are allowed visa free entry you get what is available. He must have used the wrong stamp. Because after NOv 1, American citizens get 90 days visa free.

Id go down to the immigration police and get that sorted.

I’m a UK citizen, when I came to Taiwan in 2010 the guy at passport control stamped my passport with the 30 day stamp, I had to tell him that UK citizens get 90 days not 30. I’ve since had a couple of problems with Taiwanese staff at passport control who don’t quite get what is going on. I think you should be fine though, just get in contact with the immigration police and they should be able to sort it.

It’s your responsibility at the airport to make sure the stamp is correct before you leave the counter. Next time, pay a little more attention when you’re entering a country.

That being said, get over to NIA immediately first thing Monday morning and get it sorted out, if possible.

Yea, US and Canada have this thing where the passport control can authorize UP TO 90 or 180 days… depending if its US or Canada. I don’t know how Taiwan works because I only get an entry stamp, but in the EU they just stamp an entry date with no indication as to how many days you may stay, and its up to you to make sure you’re staying within the 90 day per 180 day rule.

Go back to the NIA or where you entered and beg. I’ve gotten them to stamp me in a day earlier on my ARC when I didn’t have it with me when I entered (long story) and they’d stamped me in visa free. I do consider that my finest negotiation ever in Mandarin, though. :wink:

It happened to me before because I didn’t show my ARC. I went to the Immigration place and they fixed it no problem.

This happened to me once (in April 2012) at TPE when I did show my ARC! Thankfully I looked at the stamp as I walked away from the counter and saw the error. I went right back to the counter and had it corrected.

Guy

[quote=“gentletree”]I’m from the United States and used to teach in South Korea. I am currently in Taiwan considering finding long-term teaching work. I have a multiple entry visitor visa that is good through 2017. I just had a look in my passport, and a bit to my shock and frustration, I see that the man working at immigrations at the airport stamped my passport with 30-day visa except admission.

He did not ask me how long I planned to stay in Taiwan, and I certainly never told him under 30 days.

Has this ever happened to you? Did the NIA acknowledge the mistake and rectify the situation?[/quote]
The official I spoke with at the NIA told me that the visa overrides what the stamp indicates. And so, the only relevant information on the stamp is the date. He acted like it’s no big deal.

[quote=“gentletree”]
The official I spoke with at the NIA told me that the visa overrides what the stamp indicates. And so, the only relevant information on the stamp is the date. He acted like it’s no big deal.[/quote]

Hope you got that in writing

[quote=“gentletree”]
The official I spoke with at the NIA told me that the visa overrides what the stamp indicates. And so, the only relevant information on the stamp is the date. He acted like it’s no big deal.[/quote]

This is contrary to the information I’ve received from the NIA. I’ve had an active multiple-entry 60-day visitor’s visa for the past seven years (two sets of five-year visas). On two occasions the immigration officer accidentally stamped me in for 30-day visa exempt entry. On the first time, she noticed immediately and stamped “void” on the visa exempt entry stamp and re-stamped me with the regular entry stamp. On the second time, I told the officer “…but I have a visa” after she had stamped me in for the 30 days. Then she apologized and asked me how long I was staying and I said “I’ll be leaving in four days” to which she responded “If you are leaving in four days than it’s okay, but if you’re not sure then I can change it.” This exchange somehow implies to me that the entry stamp does make a difference.

When I returned to Taiwan last week, I asked two separate immigration officers (one organizing the foreigner line and the other stamping my passport) the difference between using my 60-day extendable visa and getting 90-days visa exempt entry. I was told by both that the former was only 60-days duration but extendable (as before) twice while the latter was non-extendable but longer in duration and that I had a choice of which one to use. The officer who stamped my passport said whether to “use the visa” (liyong qianzheng) was a “personal right” (ge ren quan yi) but whatever decision I made then would be final. I chose to get stamped in for 90 days because I was pretty sure I would not need to stay longer for 90 days, while I did not want the hassle of getting my 60-day visa extended just in case I needed to stay between 60 and 90 days. So in my case, they made it clear that the visa does not simply override what the stamp indicates.

[quote=“gnaij”][quote=“gentletree”]
The official I spoke with at the NIA told me that the visa overrides what the stamp indicates. And so, the only relevant information on the stamp is the date. He acted like it’s no big deal.[/quote]

This is contrary to the information I’ve received from the NIA. I’ve had an active multiple-entry 60-day visitor’s visa for the past seven years (two sets of five-year visas). On two occasions the immigration officer accidentally stamped me in for 30-day visa exempt entry. On the first time, she noticed immediately and stamped “void” on the visa exempt entry stamp and re-stamped me with the regular entry stamp. On the second time, I told the officer “…but I have a visa” after she had stamped me in for the 30 days. Then she apologized and asked me how long I was staying and I said “I’ll be leaving in four days” to which she responded “If you are leaving in four days than it’s okay, but if you’re not sure then I can change it.” This exchange somehow implies to me that the entry stamp does make a difference.

When I returned to Taiwan last week, I asked two separate immigration officers (one organizing the foreigner line and the other stamping my passport) the difference between using my 60-day extendable visa and getting 90-days visa exempt entry. I was told by both that the former was only 60-days duration but extendable (as before) twice while the latter was non-extendable but longer in duration and that I had a choice of which one to use. The officer who stamped my passport said whether to “use the visa” (liyong qianzheng) was a “personal right” (ge ren quan yi) but whatever decision I made then would be final. I chose to get stamped in for 90 days because I was pretty sure I would not need to stay longer for 90 days, while I did not want the hassle of getting my 60-day visa extended just in case I needed to stay between 60 and 90 days. So in my case, they made it clear that the visa does not simply override what the stamp indicates.[/quote]
In regard to visa the possibility of visa extension, there may (or would) be complications. However, I’m at the gate now waiting for my flight. Both the Asiana official and (most importantly) the immigration official said the multiple entry visitor visa overrides the way in which you were admitted, at least as concerns the issue of over-stay.