More riding adivice from someone who knows more than us

This is shown around in a few motorbike forums thought I’d share it here as well: mad-ducati.com/Articles/ThePace.html

That’s a nice couple of articles. Hardly groundbreaking, and plain common sense (isn’t it?), but nice nonetheless to see it written down. Should be translated into Chinese and be made mandatory reading for all riders here.

i second that…

should be mandatory reading for Taiwanese big bike “teams”… from personal experience I think that 90% are dangerous, under skilled, over egotistical packs of fools… why?

  • they are all out on liter class supersports bikes, almost exlcusively the first bike big they’ve ever owned… they somehow think the skills to ride properly come with the bike…

  • they think that dressing up like a power ranger and getting your knee down is some mystical rite of passage that instantly makes you a GP hero and “fast” despite the fact that the vast majority of riders in these teams are slow…

  • they think that the center line and other road laws are optional and that they insist on riding around in huge groups of 10+ riders all riding way beyond their ability to control their bikes so as to not loose face…

Yeah, I came face to face with two speed demons yesterday on the way to Yilan.
Came from behind a bus on to my side of the road to overtake it. They must have been only inches behind that bus because they appeared out of no where. Pillocks.

Hey, I like my Dainese power ranger outfiit. :wink: And I was pretty gitty the first time I scraped knee. :laughing: But you’re right Plasmatron, many times I have cursed at other groups of rider, cause they were passing by coming into my lane. Dumbasses! And I agree that too many inexperience Rossi wannabes own bikes that are far beyond their abilities. I guess this is what happens when you give morons with money the chance to buy the biggest bike without any graduated licensing system. They really need to put in a system like in North America and Japan where novice riders can’t go right out to buy any size bike they want. In Japan you would need to be way over 30, have been riding for many years without incident to ride anything over 400cc.

were we up in the mountains above Fuxing last weekend when a group set off form the top just after we did in the car. The 2nd to last guy thought we was Rossi alright. Rossi in jeans and a T-Shirt :loco:
Anyway he passed us hanging his hairy butt crack off the seat, blind corner blah blah. When we came around the corner he was on his back sliding towards an oncoming car (which his bike hit) and the bike was screaming. We stopped for a look to see he was OK, and then it dawned on me we’d mosey on outta there lest we get the blame for creating the necessity for such a stupid pass.

There’s one moron off the road (for awhile at least). T-shirt and jeans hanging off a bike. Just dumb!

[quote=“truant”]were we up in the mountains above Fuxing last weekend when a group set off form the top just after we did in the car. The 2nd to last guy thought we was Rossi alright. Rossi in jeans and a T-Shirt :loco:
Anyway he passed us hanging his hairy butt crack off the seat, blind corner blah blah. When we came around the corner he was on his back sliding towards an oncoming car (which his bike hit) and the bike was screaming. We stopped for a look to see he was OK, and then it dawned on me we’d mosey on outta there lest we get the blame for creating the necessity for such a stupid pass.[/quote]

I thought that was you…you fucker! You owe me a new pair of jeans and a T-shirt. The bike was stolen so dont’ worry about that. I’m coming for you.

Awesome. I didn’t realise you were the chubby little chinese kid. I’ll look forward to it.

Hate to be a smartarse but I did post the link to this article a year and a half ago…
[forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.ph … 958#111958](Motorcycle touring

Very good to see it with its own thread and getting attention though. It all makes a lot of sense. The late-entry cornering thing especially.

Yeah there’s a lot of greate stuff in there. There’s nothing better than picking a great apex and getting on the gas earlier than the guy infront of you. I can’t agree more about leaving your lane. I like to pretend that anything .5m on either side of my lane is game over. The fact that you CAN’T use your breaks is not easy unless you’re blipping down 3 gears.

Another fun (and safe) game to play is downshifting (in a car) either hard on the brakes (heel/toe) while matching engine speed to gear speed… or on a bike I feel that one of the best practice drills is to brake heavy blipping the throttle through the gears while you’re hard on the breaks… any jerky motion or tire slip is game over (not easy to be smooth on the front brake and rockin the throttle at the same time).

[quote=“sandman”]Hardly groundbreaking, and plain common sense (isn’t it?), but nice nonetheless to see it written down.[/quote]Did you see the bits about late-entry cornering though? That may be common knowledge but I haven’t heard about it too often, and anyone who tries to follow a “racing line” on public roads doesn’t know or doesn’t care.

To make it a little more explicit for anyone who didn’t follow:
The principle is that you slow down in time, go deep into the corner then turn the bike fairly sharply and accelerate out gently. So you stay on the outside of the corner for longer than with a racing line, where you turn earlier and smoother.

This late cornering is better for two-way public roads because you can see round the corner earlier. In addition you end up nicely positioned for the next corner.

Points of caution are of course that you don’t go too near the edge of the road because of gravel, and you certainly need decent tyres if you’re going to do it at any speed, because of the sharp turn and the acceleration. This last thing is not a problem on my FZ150! Riding a CB400 in Thailand, I gave myself a nasty shock though. Turned the bike in, gave it some welly and slid the back out nicely. Didn’t drop it but surprised myself and the following car no doubt.

[quote]To make it a little more explicit for anyone who didn’t follow:
The principle is that you slow down in time, go deep into the corner then turn the bike fairly sharply and accelerate out gently. So you stay on the outside of the corner for longer than with a racing line, where you turn earlier and smoother. [/quote]
I suppose I just never really thought it through before, as for me its always jsut been instinctive – I’ve never, even as a young guy, followed racing lines on public roads. Suicidal, if you ask me – I like to be where there’s the least chance of someone coming toward me, and that’s the outside.
I still know a few guys that I used to compete against on the RD400 back in the 70s. Its safe to say that the ones still without pins and steel plates used to treat road and track as completely different things. Which is not what I usually see among the biker packs you see here.