Nazi Themed Hair Salon


#21

I think it does. But I guess calling someone a Nazi could be slander or libel. But I said the actions are nazi like.


#22

You know this notion of “freedom of expression” protecting one’s inalienable right to be an unconscionable asswipe and to promote directed rancor in others is a particularly American (USA-type American) concept, right?


#23

Well this is the free speech vs hate speech debate I guess. Depending on the law of the land hate speech can be a criminal offence, at which point it’s not free speech but speech with potential jail time attached. In the US hate speech is protected but over the border in Canada it is illegal to advocate genocide in any form.

Dammit that pesky critter beat me to it agin.


#24

Are they from the Mainland? Most Northerners or Southerners that are Taiwanese that I know love the Japanese and have for generations. Elite families I`ve lived with in Taiwan often intermarried with Japanese and many have Japanese middle names. Your rank and file Taiwanese prefer them over the KMT/Mainlanders.


#25

Are you implying that I’d fucking marry into a family of Mainland swine??
Take it back.

I guess you never met my in laws.


#26

More crappy reporting from the K-man. Buddhist swastikas can face either direction.


#27

He isn’t breaking any laws in Taiwan for it. Im with you on him being a dick head but I think he’s allowed to be a dick head. The same way I’m allowed to criticize him for it and not spend my money there.

But the Nazi like comments was mostly from being unclear on what “demands” were. I wouldn’t describe the German Institute Calling the guy to ask him nicely as demanded. Demands sounds more like do this or else, which does sound Nazi like to me.


#28

Yes, I do. It’s one step up from the limey version, IMO.


#29

And two steps up over the peace, order and good government mantra of Canuckistan.


#30

Took you long enough.


#31

I guess the logical resolution of this is that if enough people are concerned about the issue they will exercise their equal freedom of speech and gather outside the guy’s salon and protest. Maybe a boycott as well. Then the guy will have to make a decision on how much he values his right to engage in behaviour that many people find offensive.


#32

If I go there for a haircut, I wonder if they’d be willing to carve a swastika in my fade.


#33

Not to defend him, by any stretch, but in Taiwan I’ve never seen it used in a Buddhist context where it faced the same direction as the Nazi one. Maybe they do that on purpose to differentiate themselves.


#34

You mean in your hide d65290742a5d71535462bd07881a9325


#35

It’s pretty common in India, maybe less so in Taiwan, but it does exist:


#36

That would be a reasonable resolution. Similar to painting Hey Jude on your window, being informed that it is offensive and then removing it. Refusing to do so would show one is a dickhead - but it’s still freedom of speech.


#37

Well I know some people prefer John to Paul but Hey Jude isn’t that offensive is it?

Oh, wait…I get it.


#38

probably the biggest incentive would be loss of business.

But I wonder…I’m hoping I’m wrong but I can sadly see the place becoming popular for the publicity in Taiwan. People are rather ignorant about the Nazis here.


#39

Lol they didn’t.

That’s what they said. It’s very bossy.


#40

You can take the Nazis out of Germany, but…