Neighbours burning ghost money in the stairwell - WTF!

I’ve recently moved into a new apartment, in a nice complex.

I’m on the third floor.

Just last night the neighbours below were burning ghost money in the silver tub thingy in the stairwell.

That’s not normal, is it? First time I’ve seen it in my 10 years in Asia.

Besides that, it’s a health/fire risk, no?

I’m loathe to complain, as I don’t want bad blood with them, but it a bit bloody rude of them, innit?

I’ve seen it one time in Taipei. The lady was old and apologized while I was staring at her.

I know you don’t want to upset your neighbors, but it’s rude and they know it. So it’s up to you to either live with it for as long as you live there or do something about it (complain/move).

I had that happen once in my old place and made it very very clear I would not tolerate it. Bad blood my ass. I can put up with gossip and stares.

Once had somebody do it in our office building in Neihu, ashes flying down the corridor and worried looks all round.

Idiots.

It’s a vicious cycle of burning paper for the dead, then dying from smoke inhalation, then having your relatives burn paper for you which in turn kills more people and so on and so on

Nicely put. :laughing:

I think it’s normal for Chinese, for a very long time. I am not sure why it isn’t common in Asia or just in Taiwan (based on your reply) probably because Taiwan is environment friendly place or the place you commonly live do not have much religious or superstitious Chinese people. Even though I am an Overseas Chinese teen, I have already encountered a lot of other Overseas Chinese families burning all kinds of things like huge paper houses, paper cars, etc in large quantities to mourn the deceased and the Qing Ming Festival. Other than these, during festivals that are dedicated to Gods they would also burn extra large joss sticks that would burn for hours or days!! I think you will have culture shock if you are in my position haha but it’s an interesting culture I would say. ;D

The smoke may be intense but I doubt it’s as dangerous as the ciggy the smokers smoke. Just don’t purposely go inhale them!
What I suggest you can do is tolerate, they probably won’t do that everyday but just on special occasions; I think it’s once or twice per year kind of thing?
Another suggestion is, why not ask your neighbor what is it about? Getting to know each other would be nice!
When in Rome, do as the Romans do! When in Chinese regions, do as the Chinese do!

Some links lol. ;o
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joss_paper
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qingming_Festival

Once or twice a year. May I lecture you missy instead?

The Taiwanese burn stuff ALL THE FRICKING TIME.

When they are not burning stuff they are BLOWING STUFF UP.

Dealt with that once in a building I lived in previously. Once. It was made abundantly clear that would NOT be tolerated again.
There’s no excuse for not heading down to street level from your apartment floor if you feel the need to burn stuff.

you need to take the fire extinguisher and blow it out, then, call the cops.

[quote]What I suggest you can do is tolerate, they probably won’t do that everyday but just on special occasions; I think it’s once or twice per year kind of thing?
Another suggestion is, why not ask your neighbor what is it about? Getting to know each other would be nice!
When in Rome, do as the Romans do! When in Chinese regions, do as the Chinese do! [/quote]

They have TWO burner bins. Not one, TWO!

And they burn money at least once a week.

Re. making friends with them - they’ve already complained to building management that I scraped my chair on the floor one early morning (7am-ish). They seem to be the type who want to bully the new neighbour into submission - no interest in making friends with them.

Next time they get a telling off from me or the bao an or building management.

[quote=“limei”]
Another suggestion is, why not ask your neighbor what is it about? Getting to know each other would be nice!
When in Rome, do as the Romans do! When in Chinese regions, do as the Chinese do!

Some links lol. ;o
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joss_paper
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qingming_Festival[/quote]

Thanks for the lecture to we who don’t understand Taiwan/Chinese culture. However, the OP is complaining about burning paper money INDOORS!!

It’s not normal to burn ghost money indoors. :no-no: It’s not part of Chinese culture to burn ghost money indoors! :no-no: Only idiots do it.

Yes, it has happened in my building once. My neighbor downstairs, who’s not a bad old stick. It was raining outside so I guess that’s why. Still pretty dumb though.

[quote=“limei”]I think it’s normal for Chinese, for a very long time. I am not sure why it isn’t common in Asia or just in Taiwan (based on your reply) probably because Taiwan is environment friendly place or the place you commonly live do not have much religious or superstitious Chinese people. Even though I am an Overseas Chinese teen, I have already encountered a lot of other Overseas Chinese families burning all kinds of things like huge paper houses, paper cars, etc in large quantities to mourn the deceased and the Qing Ming Festival. Other than these, during festivals that are dedicated to Gods they would also burn extra large joss sticks that would burn for hours or days!! I think you will have culture shock if you are in my position haha but it’s an interesting culture I would say. ;D

The smoke may be intense but I doubt it’s as dangerous as the ciggy the smokers smoke. Just don’t purposely go inhale them!
What I suggest you can do is tolerate, they probably won’t do that everyday but just on special occasions; I think it’s once or twice per year kind of thing?
Another suggestion is, why not ask your neighbor what is it about? Getting to know each other would be nice!
When in Rome, do as the Romans do! When in Chinese regions, do as the Chinese do!

Some links lol. ;o
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joss_paper
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qingming_Festival[/quote]

As others have said people here burn all the time. When my neighbors do it, carcinogenic smoke fills the street for the whole morning. Do you get that? CARCINOGENIC SMOKE. Fuck off that I have to tolerate that.

And in other Chinese regions no, people are not permitted to burn CARCINOGENIC MATERIAL three or four times a month and certainly not on busy commercial and residential streets.

There are laws against smoking in public in Taiwan, but none against burning vast quantities of other CARCINOGENIC MATERIALS. :loco:

Pee on it to show dominance.

Pee on it to show dominance.[/quote]

Yes, I was going to remark something similar. Isn’t it a part of your culture Baas, to spray a glass of piss outside the homes of people who burn money indoors? :laughing:

In all seriousness, these fuckers have the front to burn money in a public place and then complain that you moved a chair… and you don’t want to cause trouble? Bend over and wait for the red hot poker.

If heaven exists and it is full of money burning little fuckers like them then I want to go to hell.

Many Taiwanese are afraid of clean air. Really freaks them out. Sunshine unfiltered by particulate matter is the worst thing. Every time we have a clear day my Lizhang jumps on the PA system and rallies the neighborhood to start burning shit. There is not enough pollution today! We need more pollution! We must burn stuff! Clean air is an insult to our ancestors! We must give ourselves lung cancer so that we may join them in the afterlife! Etc etc.

I had the exact same experience, perhaps not in the means, but in the ends.
:whistle:

I would and will do that.

Sorry for my lack of understanding of Taiwanese culture, I thought they’re similar like other Chinese. Burning those ghost money every week is kind of extreme because it is supposed to be occasional/annual incident as I know. :confused: Since your neighbour is kind of like a bully, I don’t think you should tolerate them then. :frowning:

Nice mea cupla. :bravo: Yep, if it was just a few times a year for special ceremonies no one would complain. The fact that clearly idiotic things are tolerated here is one of the biggest drawbacks of living on the Wan.