New Trail System Around Yushan

I’m not able to find a lot about this right now but it seems the parks people have reopened a number of old trails through Yushan National Park. It seems you can now walk from Dongpu all the way down to the Yuli or to the South Cross Island highway. Bith trips takes 7 days. There are campsites along the way as the itinerary routes show.

english.ysnp.gov.tw/Publication. … 14&Level=1

If the trails are as well posted and mapped as other mountains seem to be in Taiwan inrecent years then this is fantastic. There are several routes, from 3 to 10 days.

Does anyone have more info?

Here are some quotes:

Several hiking maps show the Patungkuan (Batongguan Gudao) trail, but with variations. According to one map I have, the eastern stretch of the Gudao actually passes north of Walami, on the other side of the river.

I understand that the Qing authorities (who created the original trail) and the Japanese had different trail-building philosophies. The former tended to blaze as straight a line as possible, to reduce distance, while the latter took careful note of countours, to avoid having any steps. They did this to allow the use of wheelbarrows, which made bringing in heavy loads (e.g. dismantled artillery pieces for bombarding aborigines) much easier.

Some years back, some friends of mine hiked from Siangyangshan down to Duomeili and out via Walami. The hike involved crossing a number of very damaged/dangerous wire bridges. That was pre-921 and various typhoons, so the recent restoration work must have been quite a job.

A Taiwanese hiker once told me that around 15 years ago, when cross-island hiking was easier, there was an aboriginal couple living at Dafen who survived by farming, hunting, and selling hot meals to hikers passing through.

[quote=“StevenCrook”]Several hiking maps show the Patungkuan (Batongguan Gudao) trail, but with variations. According to one map I have, the eastern stretch of the Gudao actually passes north of Walami, on the other side of the river.

I understand that the Qing authorities (who created the original trail) and the Japanese had different trail-building philosophies. The former tended to blaze as straight a line as possible, to reduce distance, while the latter took careful note of countours, to avoid having any steps. They did this to allow the use of wheelbarrows, which made bringing in heavy loads (e.g. dismantled artillery pieces for bombarding aborigines) much easier.

Some years back, some friends of mine hiked from Siangyangshan down to Duomeili and out via Walami. The hike involved crossing a number of very damaged/dangerous wire bridges. That was pre-921 and various typhoons, so the recent restoration work must have been quite a job.

[/quote]

Well, they’ve got a huge budget for trail rebuilding (NT3-5 billion) and the article did say they spent the last three years in reconstruction. Also, I did receive an invitation last month to join a 10 day trek in the area from the forestry bureau so I imagine this is not some collapsing path we are taking about.

And you know how cautious the authorities are here. They wouldn’t put out the map linked above if those trails weren’t something ordinary people could follow. I wonder though about permits.

Anyway, I hope to get down to the area around CNY and check things out. A long spring hike is definitely in order.