New Website: Snakes of Taiwan

Hi everyone,

my snake site project has now finally come to fruition. It’s neither pretty nor cleverly designed, but utterly utilitarian; however, my original goal was to provide something currently not yet in existence: a web page providing quick references, photos and links to further information on ALL known snakes in Taiwan at one glance.

I tried to include as much information in English as possible, but for some species there is none - hence the language mix. I’ll translate the Chinese parts into English as soon as I get around to it. For real in-depth info and a great read, I recommend this excellent book.

If you find any mistakes or can provide further or better info than I’ve included, please let me know.

Cheers

Hans

Cool.
It’s nice to read that info in English.
It would also be good if I didn’t have to scroll the page sideways to read it.
Keep tweaking it!

Will do, thanks!

If any of you have personal experience with any of these species (habits, behavior, whathaveyou), please don’t hesitate to let me know. This site was originally thought up as an information source for hikers/bikers, so the more info there is, the more the people (and the snakes!) will benefit.

That’s tremendously interesting, and an excellent reference source! Good work, TT.

I’ve just had a quick browse, and will enjoy a more thorough perusal later when I have enough time.

I’ve encountered quite a lot of those snakes over the years, but the one I meet by far the most often is the Sauter’s ground or water snake. They’re lovely little creatures, and there are families of them inhabiting most of my favourite swimming places. This summer, I’ve been swimming very frequently (nearly every morning) in one particular spot that has small branches of a couple of trees hanging down just above the water. Most days, those little fellows come swimming across the pool, raise their necks up out of the water to catch hold of the branches, then slither up and rest there. Sometimes there are as many as three at a time on one branch.

When I first started swimming in mountain streams in Taiwan, I got quite a scare when one of them came swimming towards me, and got out of the water double quick. But I soon learnt from the locals that they’re completely harmless, and got to look forward to having them as my swimming companions.

Omni,

sounds like you live near Pinglin :slight_smile: I wish we had that much natural water round these parts here. Alas, unless a typhoon has just passed through, the creeks and rivers here on Yangmingshan are perennially dry, the result of too many farmers and other locals tapping the streams for their own use.

I’m trying to picture three of those critters sitting on a branch - what a treat that must be! We have a lot of rat snakes and Taiwan habus up here; and three years ago, my son had the questionable honor of ALMOST stepping on a Chinese cobra (up on Zhongzhengshan, behind Beitou) Luckily, the snake feared him as much as he feared the snake, so tragedy was averted.

I’m building a second greenhouse on the lawn in my backyard, and as I’ll leave the grass untouched, I can look forward to many reptilian/amphibian visitors. My old greenhouse is on top of my garage, so the only vertebrates that ever visit there are the geckos - at night, they prowl around the larger pitcher plants and search for dead insects inside the pitchers… sometimes to meet an early demise themselves…

I’m sick of all these motherfckin snakes on this motherfckin island!

Try to eat some of them. Snake meat is known to cure depression.

You should go and live in Ireland, Samuel, L. St Paddy sorted out the snake problem ages ago.

Oh Happy Day! I just ran into the first Taiwan Banded Krait of my life this morning, just a bit up the road behind our house. Luckily (for me) it was roadkill. But what a sight! I had a tough time getting our four dogs away from the carcass - touching the teeth can still kill ya within 24 hours after the snake’s death.

I’ve actually seen quite a few of those guys plastered on the roads outside of Nantou.

Good work on the site. I’ve run into more snakes than I care to while I’m out biking or hiking with my dogs and it’s good to have a site where I can quickly reference what I’ve seen. Keep it up, as I’m sure other people would like to know what’s slithering around out there.

Thanks for the nice words! Herpetologists should always hike with dogs, while ornithologists should always leave them at home :slight_smile:

Do you live in Nantou, Bokgwai?

[quote=“TwoTon”]Hi everyone,

my snake site project has now finally come to fruition. It’s neither pretty nor cleverly designed, but utterly utilitarian; however, my original goal was to provide something currently not yet in existence: a web page providing quick references, photos and links to further information on ALL known snakes in Taiwan at one glance.

I tried to include as much information in English as possible, but for some species there is none - hence the language mix. I’ll translate the Chinese parts into English as soon as I get around to it. For real in-depth info and a great read, I recommend this excellent book.

If you find any mistakes or can provide further or better info than I’ve included, please let me know.

Cheers

Hans[/quote]

GREAT WORK. THAT IS ON MY FAVORITES LIST.
Perhaps make the pictures much smaller as a surfer can always click on them to enlarge.

Great stuff :bravo: :beer: :bravo:

Thanks for the kudos - undeserved as they might be :slight_smile: I just slapped together an ugly Excel file because I never seem to have time to create a really nice site :blush:

I chose the size of the pix to be thus, because people should be able to at least have an idea of the general appearance of a critter. Too small, and the thumbnails become blurs.

[quote=“TwoTon”]Thanks for the kudos - undeserved as they might be :slight_smile: I just slapped together an ugly Excel file because I never seem to have time to create a really nice site :blush:

I chose the size of the pix to be thus, because people should be able to at least have an idea of the general appearance of a critter. Too small, and the thumbnails become blurs.[/quote]

Send me the file when it is finished and I will put it up on microsoft frontpage for you.

Let me know. I 'll do it for free and make it a look more professional, as I have done with many. There is around a 10$US a month charge to have it uploaded onto the server.

Anyway I am here to help and would love it, if you could include poisnous frogs and toads as well :bravo:

Thanks very much for the offer! Yes, I’d like that. I created my other page with Frontpage (and the help of JAlbum), it’s not all that bad, unless you want to make something really professional

Only thing is - I’d like to host it on my own server :slight_smile: That possible? Oh, and I can’t add poisonous amphibians, unless you show me one native to Taiwan :slight_smile:

generally speaking, if a dog is bitten by a poisonous snake, hundred pacer or cobra, and it managed to inject an average amount of venom into a medium sized (too-goh) dog…how long would I have to get the dog to a vet to save it?

do vets (small one vet shops) in Taiwan carry snake antivenom?..or would it best to take the dog to a larger vet hospital?

Hey Two Ton, congrats on the informative and colorful website about snakes. At least it helps people like me re-realize that actually most snakes are not deadly.

Out of curiosity, a cousin of mine told me that Japanese had a experimental station here producing biological and chemical weapons and that as part of that, they had imported many different types of snakes to Taiwan. And that, after notice of the war surrender, they released all of these snakes.

Is all this true or is my cousin just trying to be interesting at storytelling? :unamused:

[quote=“fwulin”]Out of curiosity, a cousin of mine told me that Japanese had a experimental station here producing biological and chemical weapons and that as part of that, they had imported many different types of snakes to Taiwan. And that, after notice of the war surrender, they released all of these snakes.

Is all this true or is my cousin just trying to be interesting at storytelling? :unamused:[/quote]

Go ahead and check out [url=http://tw.forumosa.com/t/snakes-in-taiwan-and-the-japanese-era/46055/1 thread[/url].

Its a story. True, the Japanese had research going on when they were ruling Taiwan. Reason for that is because as a predominantly agrarian society, people used to get snakebit a lot, so there was a need for antivenin. That’s what the Japanese were doing. With local snakes, not imported ones, obviously. When the Japanese pulled out, maybe the research was curtailed, but the idea of them suddenly running away and releasing large numbers of venomous snakes into the wild is just a cute horror story.
Even if they DID do such a thing, the natural balance of things would have brought the numbers down in a matter of a few months – the number of snakes is directly related to the number of frogs, lizards and birds’ eggs.

You should go and live in Ireland, Samuel, L. St Paddy sorted out the snake problem ages ago.[/quote]

Yep, he turned them into eels … in which case the Japanese can help with an eel problem, they love to eat them … as do the Taiwanese and the Dutch …