No More Health Exams for Teachers

The Council of Labor Affairs moved to strengthen the willingness of foreign teachers to work in Taiwan by promulgating, on July 24, 2004 a revision of the Regulations Governing Management of the Health Examination of Employed Aliens that abolishes the requirement for schools to submit health examination certificates when applying for permission to recruit or extend the employment of foreign teachers. Instead, the schools themselves will be allowed to institute health exam measures for their foreign teachers. For more related information, please consult laws.cla.gov.tw/Chi/NewsContent.asp?msgid=348.

Mods, if this is not the appropriate place to post this, please move accordingly.

Double post! How did that happen? :blush:

[quote=“The Magnificent Tigerman”][…]
Instead, the schools themselves will be allowed to institute health exam measures for their foreign teachers. For more related information, please consult laws.cla.gov.tw/Chi/NewsContent.asp?msgid=348. [/url]

[/quote]

Nice change!

But in the interests of fairness and non-discrimination it would be nice if schools were allowed to give foreign staff health exams only if they require the same thing from their Taiwan citizen employees in similar positions?

I agree with abolishing the health test, but I think blood tests should be mandatory for obvious reasons, for all alien residents.

I don’t get it. On Friday, I told my boss about the rule change, and she had her secretary call somebody (I don’t know who), and my boss came back to me with “You have to get a medical exam.”

My boss is out of the country right now, but I guess when she comes back, I could show her the webpage.

Or I could just avoid the possibility of conflict with my boss and go ahead and get the health check.

Is there a “sigh” emoticon?

Ah ! Another Taiwanese law ! Wonder what this one will mean ? I think we should run a book on it. I have given it a look over and can advise that it is actually about the length of the sticks upon which green lolipops may be affixed during the hours of darkness in public areas. Or something.

Yes, everybody. You will still have to get a medical. It’s only a law, pay no attention. If we ignore it long enough it’ll just get tired and go away.

My Chinese is too poor for me to read the page. However, I’m at my school now, and I just showed the CLA page at laws.cla.gov.tw/Chi/NewsContent.asp?msgid=348 to a native-Chinese-speaker here at the school. He says that according to the page in question, the abolition of the requirement of the health exam applies only to government schools.

No offense to anyone, and not trying to start a controversy: Just reporting what I was told by a Taiwanese reading the page. :idunno:

Anyways, think I’ll mosey on over to the hospital and get my health check. . . .

Yes that is correct.

The announcement says that when registered public or private schools employ foreign teachers, the school does not need to submit a health certificate. The announcement adds foreign teachers in Article 46.1.3 of the Employment Services Law to Class I group of foreigners, which also includes foreign professionals (Article 46.1.1) and foreign executives (Article 46.1.3).

Foreign teachers at Buxibans (Article 46.1.4) remain in Class II and their employers are required to submit health certificates from designated hospitals. The announcement states this clearly.

A small note on phrasing: You are not applying for a work permit and you are not submitting a health certificate. Your employer is applying for permission to hire you and your employer is submitting your health cerrtificate. The reason I mention this is that I believe that since the employer the one doing the applying, the employer should pay for all related expenses.

[quote=“Feiren”]Yes that is correct.

The announcement says that when registered public or private schools employ foreign teachers, the school does not need to submit a health certificate. The announcement adds foreign teachers in Article 46.1.3 of the Employment Services Law to Class I group of foreigners, which also includes foreign professionals (Article 46.1.1) and foreign executives (Article 46.1.3).[/quote]
What is correct? The statement about “government schools”? If so, I’m a bit lost. Your comments above include “private schools”.

What exactly is a “government school” anyway?

If the discriminator (deciding factor) is not public/private, but registered, then aren’t buxibans registered also?

I know it’s a big job, but please un-confuse me.

Thanks,

Seeker4

Buxibans are still required to have their teachers get health exams.

Buxibans are not schools in the view of the government. They are ‘short-term supplementary language courses’.

Schools here means public and private schools registered as schools with the government from grade one all the way through graduates schools. The regulations regarding their establishment, curriculum, and faculty are much more difficult to comply with than those governing Buxibans

Note that kindergartens and day care centers are not schools either according to this definition.

[Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice]

[quote=“Feiren”]Yes that is correct.

The announcement says that when registered public or private schools employ foreign teachers, the school does not need to submit a health certificate. The announcement adds foreign teachers in Article 46.1.3 of the Employment Services Law to Class I group of foreigners, which also includes foreign professionals (Article 46.1.1) and foreign executives (Article 46.1.3).

Foreign teachers at Buxibans (Article 46.1.4) remain in Class II and their employers are required to submit health certificates from designated hospitals. The announcement states this clearly.

A small note on phrasing: You are not applying for a work permit and you are not submitting a health certificate. Your employer is applying for permission to hire you and your employer is submitting your health cerrtificate. The reason I mention this is that I believe that since the employer the one doing the applying, the employer should pay for all related expenses.[/quote]

My school does cover the costs and called the (insert current agency that gives ARCs for work…:idunno:) who confirmed that you do need a health check and a tax slip (to prove you paid taxes) in addition to the regular stuff (ARC card, copy of every page in your passport, 2 2x2 photos, and work permit) in order to renew your ARC at the same buxiban. Perhaps this is common knowledge, but I wasn’t aware of the tax slip thing until now.

This tax slip thing was new for me, too. I was wondering why they gave me that big sheet of green paper when I paid up…

So teachers working at public schools are less likely to have infectious diseases, HIV or worms?
I wonder where they got this logic from. Or maybe I’m missing something. Does anyone know the reason for the discrimination?

Last year some fancy foreigners who work for academic institutions told the government that it was humiliating for them to be treated like migrant workers and have to take these tests. The government agreed. So this discrimination was brought about by your fellow foreigners.

Didn’t you know all foreigners have diseases ? If it wasn’t for those disgusting foreigners there wouldn’t be any disease in Taiwan. All foreigners have AIDS, you know.

I posted a query about this report some time ago and everybody was asleep. Anyway, the only reason I can come up with is that the separation between Class I and Class II is that public and private schools will hire Class I teachers, ie: “clean cut and handsome professionals with a degree in education” or what ever… and the Class II yokels are that lot of dirty, back-packing dreadlocked, unshaven, braless elephant riders fresh out of south asia looking for a bowl of rice.

It’s too bad that the CLA had to categorize all the other English teachers in the above category.

Anyway, a little bit of gain is worth something. Maybe in a year or two, All the decent “Class II” peoples who give their hearts out to the students here will be accepted as first class folks.

Really, how is it that someone working for a local highschool has cleaner blood, shit or a crotch than the guy or gal who got a Class I job!

The fact is that in my situation I don’t need any Taiwanese doc to poke around me or sniff my piss and caca. Others are not so lucky!

It seems that the CLA has established a new heriarchy of English teachers, Class I, whose shit doesn’t stink and Class II whose shit does.

Seven years’s and it’s still all a joke to me!

That’s another deal I don’t get. I had my exam Tuesday, and for the first time, there was no pee or poo test. When it was becoming obvious that these tests weren’t in the process at this hospital, I specifically asked the doc, who spoke English, “No stool or urine sample?” and she said no.

I wonder if maybe there’s just a mixup at that particular hospital, or if it’s not required now. . . . or what?

Unfortunately, if I had a Master’s degree and two years experience working in a professional job back home, I wouldn’t be in Taiwan. I would have held on to that professional job.

Here is what we should all do. To protest the double standard, we should all demand a thorough medical exam. Seeing as we paid for it, I would actually like to get the service I am forced to pay for. Last time I waited for an hour and they didn’t even ask me my name. I didn’t even see a doctor. Nurse after nurse. What a scam they have going there.

Start doing that, the hospitals will demand the government to stop having us checked. It will take too long and cost too much money. Plus the freaking Doctor might have to do some work.

Ski

So does this “Class I” exemption also include those of us who aren’t teachers?