Office 365 vs standalone licenses

Are there any reasons to not get Office 365? I think there was some initial backlash but it seems like a pretty good overall value.

Two licenses needed - home and work (a 3rd next year)
Publisher will be quite handy (not included in the cheapest option)
need more than OpenOffice and especially need all computers to have the same Office software
Free Skype/Skydrive (cloud) is a small bonus

Cons - yearly cost instead of one time cost but multiple computers quickly wipe out that con

I really like Publisher. It’s about the only program out of the entire suite that I would loathe giving up. The OS alternatives just can’t do what I put Publisher through… perhaps they can. But I can’t figure out how to use them. Unlike OpenOffice, Publisher is the goto choice 4 me.

Yeah, I’m tempted… to splurge on Office 365 too. This may solve my problem. Please let me know…
My primary word processing language is English where I need full control of the layout and what not. But also practice touch typing in Chinese.

Though both English and Chinese versions of Word handle Chinese documents well enough, only the Chinese version seems to have the symbol and punctuation bar along with special macros for handling Chinese quotations.
But if I choose a machine with only a Chinese version of word, I loose the ability to control the look and format since I can’t read most menu choices.

If one Office 356 account lets me switch between the different version designed for different languages, I think I will jump on the bandwagon. Let me know if it does.

I don’t like this switch to subscription-based software. It’s like paying a lease on a car… When you stop paying, you’re left with neither the money you paid nor the product you ‘purchased.’ What’s mine should be mine.

That said, I’m paying monthly for both Office 365 and Photoshop. The only thing I like is that I can actually afford them now, instead of making one massive payment of hundreds of dollars like I would have had to before, but it still bothers me that when I stop paying I’ll have nothing.

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]I don’t like this switch to subscription-based software. It’s like paying a lease on a car… When you stop paying, you’re left with neither the money you paid nor the product you ‘purchased.’ What’s mine should be mine.

That said, I’m paying monthly for both Office 365 and Photoshop. The only thing I like is that I can actually afford them now, instead of making one massive payment of hundreds of dollars like I would have had to before, but it still bothers me that when I stop paying I’ll have nothing.[/quote]

yeah, that’s a negative and the initial reason that there was backlash. I looked at the overall package and it’s hard not to go the subscription route if you want two legal licenses. It doesn’t hurt that you also get more software (publisher and access) in addition to other freebies. $280 once vs a $100 subscription. Getting a single subscription is where things kind of suck. I guess you could find out if there are any close friends that wouldn’t stiff you in a year that you could split the subscription with. That isn’t the easiest thing to do though.

Of course they do still have the same standalone licenses that they always have so I don’t understand your complaint since now you simply have more options.

Adobe is dropping permanent licenses, and I won’t be the least bit surprised if Microsoft follows suit. I think subscription-based software is the wave of the future, unfortunately.

Adobe is dropping permanent licenses, and I won’t be the least bit surprised if Microsoft follows suit. I think subscription-based software is the wave of the future, unfortunately.[/quote]

I’m not surprised that they are going this route considering the massive use of pirated software. It’s definitely annoying though since someone could easily have $300-$500 of recurring subscription software. But at the same time the open source programs are improving and Open Office and GIMP are decent programs. Pretty reasonable alternatives.

Adobe is dropping permanent licenses, and I won’t be the least bit surprised if Microsoft follows suit. I think subscription-based software is the wave of the future, unfortunately.[/quote]

I’m not surprised that they are going this route considering the massive use of pirated software. It’s definitely annoying though since someone could easily have $300-$500 of recurring subscription software. But at the same time the open source programs are improving and Open Office and GIMP are decent programs. Pretty reasonable alternatives.[/quote]

(Disclaimer: I work for the company that makes Office, Office 365, and all that other software you love to hate. Opinions posted here are my own and usually don’t reflect those of my employer blah blah but I’d be lying if I said I was completely unbiased.) This also means I probably shouldn’t comment on one subscription service but should talk about the industry as a whole. :unamused:

Adobe’s subscription service has already been cracked:
techdirt.com/articles/201306 … ours.shtml

From a purely business perspective, it seems like it happened too quickly for it to be a very strong “lock”. I believe there will always be a group of people who choose not to pay for software, music, or other digital media. There are endless reasons: some do it because they can, some for the challenge, some like collecting software even if they’ll never use it, and others simply loathe the system (or companies) in place.

If you know that a certain number of people will not pay for your product regardless of how strong your copy protection, you have to change the model so that it only stops casual copiers. Otherwise it’s a game of cat and mouse where you’re always trying to stay one step ahead of the pirates. Some companies play the game and others focus their resources elsewhere.

What subscriptions gains a company is a more consistent revenue stream. Rather than pushing your software into specific cycles so that you can meet financial reporting schedules, you can depend on people paying the same amount regardless of your release cycle. As much as I hate it, I think the industry will eventually be models of Open Source or Subscription with very few products owned outright.

Call me old fashioned, but I prefer a piece of media that I can hold in my hands. For music, movies, and software, when I rely on some outside company to “approve” my activation, I’m at the mercy of that company to stay in business and keep its policies in place long enough for me to use the product at my leisure. I’ve seen a lot of situations where a company decides to quit supporting their “rights-managed” product, leaving the “customers” to pay for something else.

My philosophy: Go for products that are too big to alienate customers:

  1. For music and videos, choose non-DRM or choose the biggest players like Apple or Amazon. They have enough users they they won’t dump them.
  2. For E-Books: Choose non-DRM or Amazon. Too hard to predict what will happen with Barnes and Noble.
  3. For Operating Systems: Choose the one that makes you most productive. Apple and Microsoft are both critical mass. I don’t know enough about Android but it seems like there are so many flavors that long-term support is not guaranteed (based on my own lack of research).
  4. For Office suite:
    4a. Go free if it does what you need (I mean OpenOffice or something designed to be free. I’m not encouraging piracy).
    4b. Take advantage of cheaper Microsoft Products. For example: Office Home and Student may suit your needs for a one-time purchase (do English teachers in Taiwan get educational discounts or does it only apply to public schools and universities?)
    4c. Got several computers and Office is a “must have”? Do the subscription.

Adobe? Do the math. How often do you upgrade now? Don’t fool yourself into thinking of how often you WANT TO upgrade. You’ll definitely end up paying more.

It has nothing to do with piracy. They just want:

1a) A continuous revenue stream, even if you don’t use it, you will still keep paying for it because of that “just in case”.
1b) Be able to hold your data ransom. Sure there will be export methods, but many will be just annoying enough that the user will decide that paying the monthly fee is easier.
2) Give direct access to your data to the NSA and co.

Ended up getting Office 365 at 3C. Microsoft is not surprisingly inept at web programming. My US credit card is registered at my Taiwan address and can only be used on Microsoft Taiwan site (only Chinese). The US site wouldn’t accept my US paypal account probably due to the first month trial being free and thus not actually billing paypal. The product key from 3C worked except I missed the dropdown menu for English since the purchased in Taiwan product key changed my account to Chinese. I successfully got it installed but had to uninstall and reinstall with customer service.

If I didn’t have multiple computers and a bunch of existing files whose formatting gets lost when opening in OpenOffice (or the opposite) I wouldn’t have bothered with a subscription though. I am interested in using Publisher though. I think it will save me a lot of time and produce better products but it there will be a learning curve.

I have considered getting some Adobe photo processing software in the past but their subscription plan is $20/mo for new customers. GiMP is good enough at those prices.