Online resources for learning traditional characters

Hi.

I’m planning on going to Taiwan next year to study Chinese. Currently I’m learning simplified characters, as that’s what my teacher teaches us and what my books use. I’m also studying a bit on my free time, about 10-15 words/characters a day, with Memrise, and writing simplified characters a between 3-4 hours a week.

Unfortunately, I can’t find any similar resources for learning traditional Characters, I can’t even find a dictionary with the stroke orders of traditional characters. I tried inputting a traditional character into the one that I use for simplified characters (visualmandarin.com/tools/dictionary/) but it only showed me the simplified version. I’m going to apply for the Huayu Enrichment Scholarship and want to be able to tell them that I’ve studied on my own to show that I really want to learn, but I can’t tell them I’ve only been learning simplified characters. They wouldn’t believe me when I said that I’d much rather go to Taiwan than China if I’m learning simplified characters. They’d think they were my backup plan and probably wouldn’t give me anything.

So, what I’m wondering is if there simply aren’t as much resources for traditional characters as there are for simplified. But of those that exist, what do you guys recommend? Should I be old-fashioned and go with books, perhaps? Any in particular that you’d reccomend?

Also, can someone recommend the equivalent for traditional characters of 搜狗? I can input traditional with 搜狗 but they’re far back on the list, it’s very inconvenient.

Thank you.

I’m keeping a list of websites recommended by my kids’ teachers and other people around me, that you can use to learn traditional Chinese characters. Some are really for kids, but there are one or two that have online and printable characters and animated stroke orders:

kidzone-tw.blogspot.tw/search/la … %20Chinese

Thanks, I’ll check that out!

I agree with @asiababy about web resources from the Taiwan Government’s OCAC.

Apart from the stroke order animations in the “Write” option for the OCAC resource that @asiababy referenced - Chinese Vocabulary Online Flashcards @ OCAC.gov.tw, which also has audio - there is also “Stroke Order for Chinese Characters” inside their “Vocabulary Treasury” which is itself part of their “Fun with Chinese Learning” resource at [ edu.ocac.gov.tw/lang/chineselearn/ ]. Both are designed for kids, so if you can deal with that…

The popular online dictionary MDBG.net also has the option for traditional characters. Just choose Traditional Chinese from the dropdown option, or just input a traditional Chinese character, or just click on the traditional character when it appears in your search… then click on the double arrow next to the Chinese character for even more options, then click on the paintbrush which will load the stroke order animation applet.

I just found three more large resources for learning traditional Chinese characters by stroke order animations on one of my pages, “What is the proper stroke order to write that Chinese character?” [ learnchineseok.com/2011/05/w … order.html ]. There are altogether ten free online resources listed there, so no need to write them all out again here. Learnchineseez has a separate page for 4000 traditional characters, and their animated GIFs for stroke order, listed by “frequency of use”. Dr. T. Xie’s collection of stroke order animated GIFs has both simplified and traditional characters together, listed in pinyin order. And at the Stroke Order Diagrams of the “Chineselearners” site, you can just paste in the traditional Chinese character you want to get your desired stroke animation (includes Chinese-English dictionary, pinyin as well as bopomofo zhuyin).

Looks like there’s plenty there!

There’s this. It’s pretty decent.

Learning to write Chinese characters is actually not difficult, as long as you master the strokes and stroke order, then practice regular, writing Chinese characters can be very easy.

OK, folks with the links – please discuss how your promoted link has something to do with this thread, and give a basic idea of what it is. Otherwise you’re not contributing to the conversation, you’re advertising. Linkspam. It’s also much more honest to state that you have an affiliation with said link, which I gather both of the two previous posters do.

Thanks for your cooperation.

[quote=“ironlady”]OK, folks with the links – please discuss how your promoted link has something to do with this thread, and give a basic idea of what it is. Otherwise you’re not contributing to the conversation, you’re advertising. Linkspam. It’s also much more honest to state that you have an affiliation with said link, which I gather both of the two previous posters do.

Thanks for your cooperation.[/quote]

I couldn’t edit the post above, since I made it in 2013.

Basically, I take a bunch of CJK and frequency data, compile a dictionary and sample sentence database around it, and use it to produce a deck that sorts all of the cards by difficulty (based on the aforementioned data). The deck works by testing one’s ability to produce the (so-determined) rarest character and pronounce the term/sentence on each card.

I use it for myself, and then give it away. I mention it when people complain about how hard it is to start studying Chinese on their own. That’s the extent of the “advertising” I do for it.

Actually the poster after you was the one who seems to advertise…sorry!