Online TEFL courses recognized by Taiwanese gov?

I’ve been looking around at TEFL courses near me and online. One I’ve found that says it’s internationally accredited is teflcorp.com. Does anyone know if this TEFL certificate would be recognized by the Taiwanese government? I was surprised to find out the online price. It was much cheaper than the Foreign Language Institue here in Nashville whose TEFL course is almost 2K.

I’m wanting to get the TEFL cert. and an Associate’s to be able to get a work visa to teach English. This is faster…plus the only reason I really wanted a bachelor’s was to get in the door there. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

onine degrees/certificates are not recognized.

33 views and only one reply. I had read all the material on the forums about this subject that I could find. I just thought something may have changed and wanted to ask some people living and teaching in Taiwan because I thought that would be a good place to start.

xtrain answered correctly. 33 people wanted to help! That’s good. Nothing more to add, surely?

73 views now! I think people were keen to look because they were worried you could be exploited by someone offering fake/worthless qualifications - but saw that a proper reply had been given.

I did a “proper” TEFL course in London and an MA degree (linguistics) at London Univ… Both were hard work and the TEFL revolved around classroom teaching practice. They cost alot too. How is it possible to qualify for something online when so much of what makes a good teacher is person-to-person skills? Would you be teaching your students online? In which case, no need to come to Taiwan at all.

Well, I enjoyed the TEFL course and passed well. One thing I learnt was I could never be a full time English teacher. I ended up in Asia doing other things - but often running classes on a voluntary basis for colleagues. That is my mental limit. I think I do a good job - students have often asked me if I could do extra classes etc. But no way…

It was worth doing the TEFL course just for the general skills I acquired. There’s no way I would have been comfortable in a classroom without it.

My observation of English teachers in Taiwan is that they are pretty hardened. They have a sympathetic and friendly disposition… but also know how to switch off at the end of the lesson and prepare for the next. Unless you pack in the hours, you don’t make enough money to get by. Its not an easy life. The ones that have a particular love of Taiwan do better - marrying local girls… setting up a school, etc etc.

Getting back to your question. Even if a real TEFL qualification wasn’t legally required, I think its still a good idea to do one. Its not just a “foot in a door” issue. Everytime you look to change jobs, its useful to have a qualification to underpin your CV. Also without the skills acquired from a professional training, you could feel out of your depth in the classroom and quickly find youself out on your ear as students complain. In any case, there are plenty of people roaming around Asia with recognised TEFLs, so you’re at a market disadvantage without one. (Not to mention visa problems etc)

Thank you for the thorough reply london-boy.
I had suspected the site I visited was a scam, but wanted some confirmation. I was excited because it was much cheaper and more convenient than the course in my city.

I have always heard that English teachers do well financially in Taiwan. What do you mean by packing in the hours? I work in EMS now, so 40 is a short week to me, lol. Anyway, I’ve read that most English teacher haul in about 25 a week, but I know teaching is even more than a fulltime job.

Thanks

OK, no online stuff accepted. Got that. What about degrees from community colleges?Are just university degrees accepted?

D-Hammer, I think the reason that this thread has comparatively few replies is that people get tired of answering the same old questions again and again. The “search” function is a bit clunky but it works OK. I just searched for you and found some threads with relevant information. You’ll have to read through them thoroughly, though, as I don’t have time to point out the specific relevant bits.
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=49690
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=29046
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=18823
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=4150
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=49690

As for your initial question regarding a distance TEFL, from a technical viewpoint I’m not sure. Certainly, distance qualifications are not accepted by the Ministry of Education for prospective college teachers here. But I’m not sure what criteria are in place regarding the diploma/TEFL combination. Anyway, I think the threads I linked to should be able to make things clearer.

London Boy’s absolutely right about the value of “proper” TEFL courses, though. The current worldwide standard for initial TEFL courses is the Cambridge CELTA or the Trinity Cert. TESOL, both of which offer a decent introduction to quite a few aspects of English teaching as well as practical teaching experience and observations. If you choose a good place to do one of these qualifications, the teaching practice is conducted with real EFL students.

Thanks, joesax. That was very helpful. One more question…if i attend a real (is accreditted and has a real, physical campus where students go and sit in classrooms and all that jazz) college, but enroll in an online program of theirs, is that degree recognized? I know I could not attend a college and take every course online, but if I do take some, would the whole degree be recognized as valid? I think it would, but…the Taiwanese gov. has said no to people that i thought were qualified before.

[quote=“D-Hammer”]Thanks, joesax. That was very helpful. One more question…if i attend a real (is accreditted and has a real, physical campus where students go and sit in classrooms and all that jazz) college, but enroll in an online program of theirs, is that degree recognized? I know I could not attend a college and take every course online, but if I do take some, would the whole degree be recognized as valid? I think it would, but…the Taiwanese gov. has said no to people that i thought were qualified before.[/quote]I think that the government specifies the proportion of a course for which you have to be physically present in classes. The info should be in the threads I linked to above.

How would they know unless they looked at transcripts which as I understand is not done often.