Pakistan votes - ain't democracy great?

:bravo: General stages a military coup, plays successive US administration for fools, allows the Taleban to operate unhindered, stacks and fires the supreme court, dodges going to the people to be elected himself… and when he (actually, only his puppet party) finally has to seek a mandate, gets the thumping he so richly deserves. Nice.

[quote=“NYT”]Pakistanis dealt a crushing defeat to President Pervez Musharraf in parliamentary elections Monday, in what government and opposition politicians said was a firm rejection of his policies since 2001 and those of his close ally, the United States.

Almost all the leading figures in the Pakistan Muslim League-Q, the party that has governed for the last five years under Mr. Musharraf, lost their seats, including the leader of the party, Chaudhry Shujaat Hussein, the former speaker of parliament, Chaudhry Amir Hussein, and six ministers.

Though official results would not be announced until Tuesday, early returns indicated that the vote would usher in a prime minister from one of the opposition parties, and opened the prospect of a parliament that would move to undo many of Mr. Musharraf’s policies and that may even try to remove him. [/quote]

[quote=“Jaboney”]:bravo: General stages a military coup, plays successive US administration for fools, allows the Taleban to operate unhindered, stacks and fires the supreme court, dodges going to the people to be elected himself… and when he (actually, only his puppet party) finally has to seek a mandate, gets the thumping he so richly deserves. Nice.

[quote=“NYT”]Pakistanis dealt a crushing defeat to President Pervez Musharraf in parliamentary elections Monday, in what government and opposition politicians said was a firm rejection of his policies since 2001 and those of his close ally, the United States.

Almost all the leading figures in the Pakistan Muslim League-Q, the party that has governed for the last five years under Mr. Musharraf, lost their seats, including the leader of the party, Chaudhry Shujaat Hussein, the former speaker of parliament, Chaudhry Amir Hussein, and six ministers.

Though official results would not be announced until Tuesday, early returns indicated that the vote would usher in a prime minister from one of the opposition parties, and opened the prospect of a parliament that would move to undo many of Mr. Musharraf’s policies and that may even try to remove him. [/quote][/quote]

Leaving the government to be formed by a choice between two of the crookedest greediest pols on the planet.

Ahhh, Pakistan.

Good grief.

[quote=“McClatchy”]The Bush administration is pressing the opposition leaders who defeated Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf to allow the former general to retain his position, a move that Western diplomats and U.S. officials say could trigger the very turmoil the United States seeks to avoid.

U.S. officials, from President Bush on down, said this week that they think Musharraf, a longtime U.S. ally, should continue to play a role, despite his party’s rout in parliamentary elections Monday and his unpopularity in the volatile, nuclear-armed nation.

The U.S. is urging the Pakistani political leaders who won the elections to form a new government quickly and not press to reinstate the judges whom Musharraf ousted last year, Western diplomats and U.S. officials said Wednesday. If reinstated, the jurists likely would try to remove Musharraf from office.[/quote]

Let’s review. Musharraf staged a coup, seized power, and turfed the constitution. When it became expedient, he rigged a new constitution – presidential rather than parliamentary – rigged the voting method, and had his illegitimate rule rubber stamped. When it came time to again go through the whole rigmoral, the Supreme Court got in his way and the US gave him grief about not stepping down as head of the army (perhaps sensing that his time was nearly done and wanting to put the next guy into position to stage another coup). Musharraf wrongfully sacked the chief justice (and others), allowed that there would be elections, but took steps to ensure that the outgoing (packed) parliament would re-elect him president rather than risk a popular vote, or a vote by an honestly elected parliament.

Now that Pakistanis have had a chance to vote, they’ve overwhelmingly rejected tin pot dictatorship… and the US administration is still backing him, and telling the Pakistanis to back off. Wow. Go team.

Yeah…I blame US President Bush…he controls the world, eh?

Damn right he does - for ten more months, when Obama comes along and SAAAAAVVVVEEEEES US! :help:

¿Si…se puede?

You mean you don’t hold Bush responsible for the positions taken by his administration?

You mean you hold US President Bush responsible for the actions referred to in Pakistan, eh?

A conservative take. Try not to think too hard in coming up with a reason to dismiss the argument, TC.

[quote=“Robert Novak”]Overwhelming repudiation of President Pervez Musharraf by Pakistan’s voters did not immediately dilute the Bush administration’s support for him. On the contrary, the first election returns were barely in Monday night when the U.S. government began pressing victorious opposition leaders not to impeach the former military strongman.

Publicly, State Department spokesman Tom Casey said that Musharraf “is still the president of Pakistan” and expressed hope that “whoever winds up in charge of the new government would be able to work with him.”

Privately, U.S. diplomats pushed hard against any effort to dislodge the retired army general who had just suffered a public rejection, unprecedented in Pakistan’s 60 years, from the office he retained last year through nefarious means.

The United States again guessed wrong in pinning its hopes on an authoritarian, anti-democratic foreign leader. Musharraf follows the pattern of South Korea’s Syngman Rhee, the shah of Iran and Ferdinand Marcos of the Philippines, all of whom went into exile after public rejection. But Musharraf remains our man in Islamabad, counted on by Washington to battle Islamist terrorists – including Osama bin Laden – despite his inconstant efforts.
[…]
No Pakistani expects help from Musharraf, who has been repudiated by the public and is not backed by the army now that he has removed his uniform. Only the State Department still takes him seriously.[/quote]

I could go for a kebab.