People who hate people with fcuked up grammar

bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22403731

YOu know who you is ! :laughing: And who be what.

All depends on the reasons for not writing correctly. There is:

Laziness
Stupidness
Foreignness
Coolness
Rushness
Onpurposeness

He, like many of his students, used to struggle at school with grammar and spelling. “Knowing when to use a semi-colon is not a determinant of intelligence. It’s a determinant of whether you can follow rules.”

It’s always the people who can’t actually do something who argue that it doesn’t matter, isn’t it? The article is right - it’s all about communication: pulling someone up over “too much, too young” is pedantic because it’s a recognised idiom, but if you can’t use basic punctuation and get your grammar more-or-less right, you’re not going to be able to communicate. At least not very clearly.

The rules are not “murky”. They take a bit of practice, but they’re pretty straightforward. Basic English books usually manage to explain the lot in a dozen pages or so. One can excuse foreignness and rushness (especially on a cellphone, where punctuation might be inaccessible). The other reasons are going to get you slapped down by the grammar Nazis, and rightly so.

[quote=“hannes”]All depends on the reasons for not writing correctly. There is:

Laziness
Stupidness
Foreignness
Coolness
Rushness
Onpurposeness[/quote]

How about notgivingafuckness. This board is full of bitter, wannabe uppity ESL folk who can’t leave their work at the buxiban so it is like citizen’s arrest after citizen’s arrest on the Grammar Police tip around these parts (though much of that lot moved over to the site that shall not be named).

Cracks me the fuck up.

edit: sry I had a query on rushness; but I realize now it was a jokeness.

I give a fuck because I’m an engineer, and I’m totally f-ing sick of reading technical documents from supposedly educated people that look like they’ve been written by 8-year-olds, not to mention incomprehensible emails full of '?!'s. I can’t tell if I’m reading a requirements spec or “what I did on my summer holidays”. If they can’t even put a document together, how am I supposed to trust them to write 10,000 lines of perfectly-structured code, where a misplaced semicolon might mean the difference between proper operation and an infinite loop?

And I’m talking about people who are supposedly native English speakers, not Taiwanese.

Incorrect puctuation can be very costly

The introduction to that article says, “Read the article bellow”. :laughing:

I can understand the need for presentable grammar and punctuation when concerning technical or otherwise formal documents and articles. And I can understand the need for decent spoken grammar during formal speech and certain public situations. But the grammar police on forums like this (these? help me out here grammar police) and others like it need to get a life. Oh yeah, I forgot. That’s why they spend so much time on forums to begin with. I bet some of these grammar police snobs end their sentences with propositions from time to time. Remember, English is a Germanic language and not subject to Latin structuring :no-no: My step-mother is the chief inspector for the grammar division. She even goes to grammar seminars :loco: Mind you, she is not an educator or academic on any level. Talking to her is like I would imagine talking to a menopausal Margaret Thatcher with vaginismus would have been. No one can stand to be around her for more than 20 minutes at a time, including my father.

yes one tends to forget that English is of GERMAN origin ! NOt latin like french, italian, spanish.

NO wonder its such a mofo of a language to speak and write actually.

I think it shows a level of stupidity that you have to cling to correct grammar at all times and insist on it from other people when they text or send you emails or write on here. If you can’t use correct grammar at work you should be hauled up for it if your job is writing things. Otherwise, who cares? It’s this rigid fastidiousness that bores the living pants off of me.

Stephen Fry serving up his displeasure on you pedants.

I give a fuck because I’m an engineer, and I’m totally f-ing sick of reading technical documents from supposedly educated people that look like they’ve been written by 8-year-olds, not to mention incomprehensible emails full of '?!'s. I can’t tell if I’m reading a requirements spec or “what I did on my summer holidays”. If they can’t even put a document together, how am I supposed to trust them to write 10,000 lines of perfectly-structured code, where a misplaced semicolon might mean the difference between proper operation and an infinite loop?

And I’m talking about people who are supposedly native English speakers, not Taiwanese.[/quote]

apples and mangoes my friend. this is not work, this is internet pontification, amateur rank letters to the editor, stuff spun while one takes a dump.

at work things need to be tidy, correct and on point, here, I’m just trying to get my point across.

i agree w/ the sentiment but if someone is trying to come across as intelligent/thoughtful in a convo or even argument they should really make sure all his commas is in place iykwim

In a convo… :no-no:

I’d be more inclined to befriend/respect someone on Facebook who wrote: “I think you’re great! Let’s talk later!” than someone who wrote: “ur gr8!!! cul8tr…!!! LOLZ!!!”

I may be an old fuddy-duddy, but I prefer to be spoken and written to like and adult, rather than a teenager. :2cents:

If your English isn’t gr8, no problem. There’s no need to intentionally write like a pubescent moron, though.

[quote=“jimipresley”]I’d be more inclined to befriend/respect someone on Facebook who wrote: “I think you’re great! Let’s talk later!” than someone who wrote: “your gr8!!! cul8tr…!!! LOLZ!!!”

I may be an old fuddy-duddy, but I prefer to be spoken and written to like and adult, rather than a teenager. :2cents:

If your English isn’t gr8, no problem. There’s no need to intentionally write like a pubescent moron, though.[/quote]

If you befriended the later you might get labelled a pedo…

I find it refreshing that a lot of the younger set is using more proper english now. Like a young lady I know , for example. An MBA from Oxford (versus my BS from Bullford) has done wonders for her engrish. She just needs to dump the Cali girl talk like, you know?

However, the net will be too stodgy for me if we all spoke like we were giving a speech at our graduation.

The net is loose as a caboose and conversational.

Of course there should be at least 89pct resemblance to proper english i suppose.

And 79 pct compliance with capitalization and commas and periods and all that shizzle.

[quote=“Deuce Dropper”]apples and mangoes my friend. this is not work, this is internet pontification, amateur rank letters to the editor, stuff spun while one takes a dump.
At work things need to be tidy, correct and on point, here, I’m just trying to get my point across.[/quote]
Thing is though, you can write a proper sentence. And you do it even when you’re pontificating. Reason is, it doesn’t take any extra effort. You don’t (I assume) sit there with a copy of Strunk and White, agonising over every sentence and semicolon. You just do it, cos you know how to. Nor (I assume) do you write atrociously sometimes because “it’s easier”. Writing is like playing an instrument. Put in enough practice, and anyone can do it competently and effortlessly. Ergo, the people who just twang tunelessly are the ones who never bothered even trying, which tells me something about their personality and approach to life in general. It’s fine if you only know three chords. It’s not fine if you don’t know what a chord is but insist on entertaining the audience anyway, because the audience is going to get up and leave.

Likewise with Mr Fry up there in the video. All very well for him to talk - he’s a wordsmith. A virtuoso. He knows how it’s supposed to be done, so he knows when it’s OK to drop the rules and when it’s not. Colloquialisms and technically-incorrect idiom enhance understanding; they don’t detract from it. There’s a difference between getting all uptight about “fewer” and “less” on a supermarket sign or bad spelling in txt messages (which, I agree, is pretty anal) and expressing frustration with badly-spelled, badly punctuated, incomprehensible drivel.

[quote=“finley”][quote=“Deuce Dropper”]apples and mangoes my friend. this is not work, this is internet pontification, amateur rank letters to the editor, stuff spun while one takes a dump.
At work things need to be tidy, correct and on point, here, I’m just trying to get my point across.[/quote]
Thing is though, you can write a proper sentence. And you do it even when you’re pontificating. Reason is, it doesn’t take any extra effort. You don’t (I assume) sit there with a copy of Strunk and White, agonising over every sentence and semicolon. You just do it, cos you know how to. Nor (I assume) do you write atrociously sometimes because “it’s easier”. Writing is like playing an instrument. Put in enough practice, and anyone can do it competently and effortlessly. Ergo, the people who just twang tunelessly are the ones who never bothered even trying, which tells me something about their personality and approach to life in general. It’s fine if you only know three chords. It’s not fine if you don’t know what a chord is but insist on entertaining the audience anyway.

Likewise with Mr Fry up there in the video. All very well for him to talk - he’s a wordsmith. A virtuoso. He knows how it’s supposed to be done, so he knows when it’s OK to drop the rules and when it’s not. Colloquialisms and technically-incorrect idiom enhance understanding; they don’t detract from it. There’s a difference between getting all uptight about “fewer” and “less” on a supermarket sign or bad spelling in txt messages (which, I agree, is pretty anal) and expressing frustration with badly-spelled, badly punctuated, incomprehensible drivel.[/quote]

So you want the uneducated to use grammar properly and the educated to use it with freedom. What? You sure there fella? :slight_smile:

No, I just want the uneducated to learn at least three chords. Surely that’s not too much to ask? They might find they like it, and learn some more. That would be a result. The great thing about writing is that it’s a freedom that’s accessible to everybody. It costs nothing, and it’s immensely powerful (at least if you learn it well). You don’t have to be “educated”, or a member of some exclusive club. Anyone has the right to write.