Permanent Residency in Taiwan


#1

Hi Richard,

Can you forward and/or spell out the fundamental requirements for attaining permanent residency based on a non-marriage situation? You could also forward an appropriate link?

I read the following article:
http://www.taipeitimes.com/news/2002/04/11/story/0000131379

I was under the impression all this time that the requirement was 270 days present in Taiwan total in a year for seven consecutive years. However, accoring to this article it is 270 consecutive days in seven consecutive years.

If this is the case, it pretty much disqualifies anyone that made more than one trip outside the country a year. In fact, it could mean that even one trip per year could disqualify someone. Even with the relaxing to 183 days could disqualify someone who had been in the country for, say, 363 days a year.

Is this article correct?

Thanks for your help.


#2

I regret that the reporters for the Taipei Times do not check their facts very carefully, or at any rate their reportage is not clear to you (i.e. the reader).

quote[quote] I was under the impression all this time that the requirement was 270 days present in Taiwan total in a year for seven consecutive years. [/quote]

This is correct. The days physically present in the ROC area need not be consecutive within the year, however you do have to have residency status, i.e. an ARC, for the full period.

Those “average foreigners” on short term visas will never be able to apply for permanent residency . . . .

When and if my human rights spin-off website gets established, I will probably put the relevant information on there, and will be able to give you a link at that time. I am still preparing the necessary document files to launch that site.


#3

This morning, I read a story in the Taipei Times that there is a proposal to change the requirements for permanent residency for foreigners who are not married to Taiwanese citizens. Here’s the article:

http://www.taipeitimes.com/news/2002/04/13/story/0000131655

The current requirement for people who are not married to Taiwanese citizens is that they must be in Taiwan 270 days each year for seven consecutive years. But the Taipei Times article says that there is a proposal to change the minimum requirement to be only 183 days instead of 270 days.

However, Richard Hartzell has informed me that up to the present time, none of the requirements for permanent residence have been changed.

And there is no guarantee that this proposal will ever be passed by the Legislature. So don’t be misinformed. The requirement is still 270 days a year for seven consecutive years. Or if you’re married to a Taiwanese citizen, then the requirement is 183 days a year for five consecutive years.

I would also like to mention that there is an “untruth” in the above-mentioned article in the “Taipei Times”. The newspaper article states that Joyce McMillan “has been regularly forced to leave Taiwan because she lacks permanent residency.” This is completely nonsense. Joyce McMillan has an ARC which she can renew indefinitely. No one with an ARC is ever forced to leave Taiwan until the day the ARC expires. And if you can renew the ARC before each time it expires, then there’s no reason why you you ever have to leave the country.


#4

Hi Richard,

Thanks for your response.

Please see the following link:
http://www.tmpd.gov.tw/tmpdweb-v4/forserv/fc1-2-2a.html

quote[quote]This is correct. The days physically present in the ROC area need not be consecutive within the year, however you do have to have residency status, i.e. an ARC, for the full period.[/quote]

In my review of the English translation of the law, I cannot find where an ARC is necessary covering the period of 270 days. For example, the link above states the following qualification for an APRC:

quote[quote]Be a foreign national over 20 years of age, who has resided legally in the ROC for at least seven successive years, during which time the applicant must have spent at least 270 days each year within the ROC.[/quote]

How have you come to this determination that an ARC is necessary?

By the way, it does seem that an ARC is a necessary document to provide during the application procedure:

quote[quote]Applicant's original Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) and a photocopy of the original (original will be returned to applicant after processing).[/quote]

Just a poor translation, or poor law? Or, as you often put it, am I (the reader) having a problem?


#5

For the so-called “average foreigners” the terminology used is resident or residency. That means that you have an ARC.

If you have a short term visa, then you are not resident, and you have no ARC.

Of course, the entire situation is somewhat confusing because the term “resident” is used differently in the tax code and in the immigration statutes.


#6

Re residency calculations:
Although I was present and living in Taiwan from 12/25/93, my official papers state that my residency began in April of 1994 because that’s when I finally got an ARC through a “real” job. So the authorities do indeed require an ARC to have it be “true” residence.

Terry


#7

If I reading the qualifications correctly, one has to have at least the equivalent of NT$ 5 million in fixed time deposits
-OR-
one has to prove income of (at least) double the basic minimum standard per month for the last three years, on which one has paid taxes of course. (That would necessitate approx. NT$ 32,000 per month or above.) An optional requirement is for documentation showing their ‘special skills’.

Hs anyone had experience in dealing with these matters? Is it possible to borrown NT$ 5 million from a bank or some other company to complete the certification requirements?
Would this satisfy the assets requirement of $NT5 million??

Thanks in advance for any and all responses.


#8

To my understanding, the rental of NT$ 5 million should cost approx. NT$ 5000 per day. Some accounting firms provide this service for those who need “certification of deposit” for fulfilling various government application requirements.


#9

Richard,

Here’s a couple of out-of-the-box but sincere questions that only you could possibly answer:

Suppose I go to the trouble of obtaining permanent residency in Taiwan (next year) and building my life around that status, what happens if, in ten years or so, the PRC and Taiwan begin to integrate a la Macau and Hong Kong? Does my residency go up in smoke? What, if any, precedence was established in Macau and HK?

Second question: what are the current residency options for foreigners in the PRC?

Thank you


#10

month for the last three years, on which one has paid taxes
of course. (That would necessitate approx. NT$ 32,000 per
month or above.) An optional requirement is for
documentation showing their ‘special skills’.

That’s me, special skills Jacobson, professional lady pleaser. No worry about NT this or NT that, just do your part to promote Taiwan’s conjugal bliss and before long you’re in with the visa of your choice in designer colors. It’s hot sweaty work but does offer a feeling of fulfillment. Loyalty is a plus, however at the end of seven years or whatever, with a PR card, you are free to change masters or even go solo. Any fouls, blips, bloops, or blunders before that time and she’s free to send you packing back to your country of origin.

So we were meant to choose 37 photos, but my girlfriend
had the marker. Anyway 91 selections later, the girl
told us "if you choose

Just stay calm during the photo sessions. It’s part of the job.
Don’t go yapping your jaws saying 'ouch" or “that tickles” unless told to.


#11

The news says Taiwan birthrates are dropping and they must figure out ways of encouraging babies.

Does that mean that it isn’t too crowded to give us citizenship anymore?


#12

Yeah, the streets aren’t nearly crowded enough. I even walked down a sidewalk without touching more than a dozen people today.


#13

From what I can tell, getting a nice Article 51.01.03 work permit and then applying for an ARC based on that seems to be a more flexible deal than the PARC, depending on the employer’s requirements of you, of course, as there is apparently no minimum 183 days per year physical presence requirement to deal with so long as you keep your ARC valid (i.e., have that job and keep renewing it when required.)


#14

hello, Guys and Gals! Now I’m really confused. As a single foreigner, do I still need to have been in Taiwan for 270 days each year to apply for the PARC? The year my mom got pancreatic cancer and died in the US, I went back for about 4 months, which would disqualify me in this case. But, if only 183 days are required, I could still apply for the PARC. Is there any way to petition for some leniency with the 270-day minimum factor?

Also, if I give a document from the bank saying that I have NT$5 million in the bank, do I still need to submit the tax forms from the last three years? What about the document reporting all of my assests as mentioned on the following website?:
http://www.tmpd.gov.tw/tmpdweb-v4/forserv/fc1-2-2a.html
I was under the impression that the tax forms and such wouldn’t be needed with such a bank statement.

Any further info would be appreciated.
Greg