Politically neutral way of referring to China, Taiwan - subversive suggestions wanted

I work in business, but also believe Taiwan is independent.

In describing our business I hate to say things like “we have capabilities in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.” I changed this to “China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan” and some people went apeshit.

To me the first option seems like Taiwan is part of China like Hong Kong and the mainland. To others the second one makes Hong Kong and Taiwan separate.

Does anyone have ideas on how to be neutral so that the language police don’t pick it up, but subversive (to China) at the same time?

I considered Greater China (which, according to wikipedia, is supposed to be more neutral in an economic context) but that to me suggests Taiwan is part of some greater China as well.

(edited to change to a more provocative title to get more views)

Well if you want to split hairs and salve your conscience, it could be that the “mainland” in China could be intended to distinguish it only from Hong Kong, and not from Taiwan.

“Mainland China and Hong Kong, and Taiwan” might get past the One China police, although it’s clunky. If you can insert some verbiage in between China/HK and Taiwan, that would disguise it a little: “Manufacturing and distribution facilities in mainland China and Hong Kong, with R&D in Taiwan”.

We have capabilities in Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China.

No different from "we have in Canada, Hong Kong and mainland China.

You can’t please everyone. Decide who matters most, and try to please those people. If you find you can’t live with that, then re-think who matters most. And sometimes the people who make the biggest stink are just a-holes who aren’t worth trying to work with. Do you really need their money? Then pander. Use the language they like when you’re with them, and speak your mind when they’re not in earshot.

Try not to have clients of differing politics in the same room. Those groups need to be kept separate anyway or there will be trouble.

Too many encounters with human nature have made me cynical.

How about “we have capabilities in the PRC, HKSAR and ROC”?

Thank you all – very interesting ideas, especially this one:

[quote=“Mucha Man”]We have capabilities in Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China.

No different from "we have in Canada, Hong Kong and mainland China.[/quote]

The main problem is though is that our main business is in “mainland China.”

I try not to make politics intrude on the business of making money, but I do believe that language matters, and the more people who naturally say “mainland China and Taiwan” (中国大陆 / 台湾) the more I think people will think of the two as one country (I may be wrong though, because growing up in Taiwan saying 大陆 is almost saying “evil empire,” but…) So anyways this is my thought exercise on how to change perceptions with new vocabulary. I do little things too like getting my company to change our dropdown list that uses that UN standard which lists “Taiwan, Province of China” and just getting IT to change it to Taiwan.

Haha I don’t think this would fly, but I like it.

We are based in Hong Kong, Taipei, and Shanghai.

lol, props to you for finding ways around kissing mainlanders ass.

in a non business manner i take no shit from mainlanders when they start to pull their bs anytime taiwan is mentioned.

[quote=“BAH”]Thank you all – very interesting ideas, especially this one:

[quote=“Muzha Man”]We have capabilities in Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China.

No different from "we have in Canada, Hong Kong and mainland China.[/quote]

The main problem is though is that our main business is in “mainland China.”[/quote]

“We are based in Taipei (or Taiwan), Hong Kong and a dozen locations (all the major cities) in mainland China.”

It is perfectly good English to put the strongest element at the end of a sentence as that is where the focus is.

We are based on Red China, Free China, and One China; oh some operations are done in a small island called Taiwan.
This machine is made, abiding One China Policy, in Taiwan.
We made Taiwan-made machine, screwed with One China Specification.

It does (simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Goebbels).
Would it be practical to mention the major cities where you operate and omit the names of all countries involved?
(You often see lists like that printed on fashion articles: “Milano Paris Nampo New York”)

[quote=“yuli”]
Would it be practical to mention the major cities where you operate and omit the names of all countries involved?
(You often see lists like that printed on fashion articles: “Milano Paris Nampo New York”)[/quote]

I would do that except we don’t have offices in HK or TW.

I think I will suggest: From our offices in Shanghai and Beijing we serve our clients in the PRC, HK, and Taiwan. I think a lot of lawyers use this nomenclature.

How about, “We serve Continental China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.”

Saying “continental” is kind of like saying “mainland”, however it’s not something people often use, so it’ll confuse people. Maybe not… haha…

But, are you talking to these clients in English? I don’t imagine that any businessman you can speak to in 100% English would go apeshit if you said, “China, HK, Taiwan”?

Let’s just throw proper English out the window: “We serve Chinese, Hong Kongese and Taiwanese regions.”

ROC, HK SAR, PRC. :wink:

That would suit ME just fine. :wink: But how does it solve the problem you told us about at the opening of this thread? :ponder:

That would suit ME just fine. :wink: But how does it solve the problem you told us about at the opening of this thread? :ponder:[/quote]

I think this one will pass the “language police” actually, and to me it signifies 3 separate political entities (actually I don’t care about HK since they’re a lost cause).

Haha I like this too, but after thinking about it Continental just appears to be an adjective. My brother always jokes when we go back to LA that we’re going back to the continent (dalu). A tangential thought – if they want to keep using “mainland China,” is this is the chance to claim Hainan island?

Most of our clients, but this is for our website actually.

Jeesh it’s annoying to have to take up the fight personally when your government won’t do it.

We serve Chinese, Hong Kongese and Taiwanese regions.

We serve East Asia (Except Japan, North/South Korea and Mongolia).