Privacy regulations in university

Hello

This forum has been a great help for me since I arrived in Taiwan so I decided to post my case. My girlfriend is a student in 輔仁大學 (Fu Jen University, in Xinzhuang, Taipei). Her Italian teacher picked her to share all her Facebook informations in front of classroom, including private photos and commentaries, concerning her family and so on.

Did anybody hear about such practices ? Is there no regulations concerning students privacy and teachers’ rights to order them to display it publicly ? (I just precise Furen is a private university)

In my own country I am quite sure this would be considered abuse.

Thanks for reading and consideration,

Cordially

That’s just … weird.

But the simple solution, surely, is to say “no”.

What I can tell you is that it’s absolutely not acceptable in Italy either. :mad:

That teacher is being abusive, imho.

Of course it is totally unacceptable to be required to show personal information. Alas ,Taiwanese people tend not to want to offend by flatly refusing. Need to learn to say NO ! imo

[quote=“finley”]That’s just … weird.

But the simple solution, surely, is to say “no”.[/quote]

Right… she is scared of being downgraded though. Thanks for answer. I must say I am really disappointed by the lack of discretion among teachers and students in general at this particular university. Several teachers frequently pretext make them practice languages but actually ask them very private questions (publicly and privately) such as if they have a boyfriend, if they sleep with him etc… seems quite insane to me.

[quote=“Copperlebrun”][quote=“finley”]That’s just … weird.

But the simple solution, surely, is to say “no”.[/quote]

Right… she is scared of being downgraded though. Thanks for answer. I must say I am really disappointed by the lack of discretion among teachers and students in general at this particular university. Several teachers frequently pretext make them practice languages but actually ask them very private questions (publicly and privately) such as if they have a boyfriend, if they sleep with him etc… seems quite insane to me.[/quote]

Teach them one English phrase:

“None of your fucking business asshole.”

Ah ah !

Sometimes I wish Taiwanese were more direct, right.
For this affair those nosy teachers have to be reminded of their proper place !

I have certainly heard of this happening, but, realistically, what you gonna do? People only abuse their power if you let them. The alternative scenario might be unpleasant, but at least you come out with your integrity intact, and the person who is trying to abuse you thinks ‘Hmm. Didn’t work’. If enough people do that, they might stop doing it purely out of boredom.

She could try complaining to the lecturer’s immediate superior (head of department), but the chances are he’s (a) also an unprofessional douchebag or (b) wet and incompetent. It’s really down to the individual to learn how to give a hard stare, a long silence, and to say “no” like you mean it.

I know the former head of the Italian Dep. At FuDa very well. I can talk to her if you want, but I’m going to need some details (not about your gf or you, but about the teacher).

It’s a bit difficult to figure out exactly what’s going on from the original post. But it sounds like it’s a language-learning class, and the teacher is asking her to talk about her family and friends as part of practice speaking the language. If so, it’s completely normal. And if she doesn’t want to use specific examples from her Facebook page that probably wouldn’t bother anyone, including the teacher, in the slightest. She could just make everything up.

Also, it certainly deserves to be noted: Facebook? Privacy? :roflmao:

[quote=“cranky laowai”]It’s a bit difficult to figure out exactly what’s going on from the original post. But it sounds like it’s a language-learning class, and the teacher is asking her to talk about her family and friends as part of practice speaking the language. If so, it’s completely normal. And if she doesn’t want to use specific examples from her Facebook page that probably wouldn’t bother anyone, including the teacher, in the slightest. She could just make everything up.

Also, it certainly deserves to be noted: Facebook? Privacy? :roflmao:[/quote]

The teacher was quite aggressive and commanded her to type her secret code, Then he would display her Facebook to the screen to show all of her comments and photos.

If you refer to the official Facebook policies, I think everyone is aware it’s a dodgy business. It doesn’t mean those informations can be displayed to everyone on command _ especially by a teacher to a classroom.

Agree with cranky laowai. Not ‘wrong’, but a dumbass thing for a teacher to do in a class full of conservative east Asians who hate sharing anything or speaking in front of their classmates. It’s generally better to minimise individual output when teaching east Asian students.

Words such as ‘aggressive’ and ‘command’ are very hard to quantify, interculturally. Mannerisms and language differences are going to be different. Is she expecting her Italian teacher to behave in the same way as her, say, British English teacher? He’s not going to be the same. My partner is Italian and those guys come across as quite abrasive at times, to me. Not ill-mannered, but they express themselves differently from my friends and family. And of course, I can’t pick up all the subtleties of Italian.

Not trying to invalidate her experience. And possibly he was just being a dick. But it’s a pretty much classic example of a student complaint, and it’s not really anything I’d worry about, if I were the teacher’s manager. I’d assume she was jus5 externalising discomfort with having to ‘perform’ in the language, as much as anything, as long as there were no other problems with the teacher.

I thought Western countries had a clear notion of privacy in general. Where is it customary to display photos of a person with his/her close ones (expect perhaps in a court of justice ?) ? … on tabloids perhaps ? .

Is the teacher Italian or a local, not that it should it matter I suppose but I assumed it was a local.
Just say no is the right answer.

He isn’t a local, nor an Italian by the way.

Ah, I assumed it was an Italian guy because it was an Italian class. ‘Western’ could mean anything, if you’re talking about cultural miscommunication, which I think we are because I think we can assume that the teacher’s intent was not to hurt the students’feelings, but to galvanise a group of mute Uni kids into doing some work.

I dunno, pre-Internet, I remember asking beginners to bring in photos of family for speaking practice which would have been watched by the class. Nothing intrinsically wrong with that in a language class, although it would be a slightly boring ‘beginner teacher’ thing to do.

It issue would seem to be how people perceive online space, I guess, as well as how people perceive something to be published or unpublished. The teacher would be ‘safer’ just going through a course book, somewhere like Taiwan, tbh. Why make waves?

If she was forced to do it and had expressed her unwillingness to the teacher but nevertheless did it out of fear of grade or something,
this is enough to go request the univeristy to do something about it. Normal public university here in Taiwan has some sort of student affair board that deal with these kind of big student-teacher problem. The board’s aim is usually to make negotiation between the two side, and also is a protective measurement for student in case of unfair grading due to the problem occurred. The final aim of the board is of course try to end the problem before it go into court procedure.
But if the negotiation fails, the faculty board has the responsibility to investigate and resolve the problem.
However this is the situation in public university, and Fu-jen is a private catholitic one. So how they deal the problem is not known.

If, however, one side is not satisfied and considering the school’s decision being unfair, you can still go to court, or more complicated way, to call for the government authority.

The student is usually considered the innocent one by the society in this kind of cases, and the teacher being the abusive one.

In the end, asking here for help is not really helpful unless there is a lawyer here. If you both feel you can not tolerate it, then find a consultant in the school or in public law service, they would be more helpful.

The Taiwanese way around this, though, is simply to repeatedly type in…a slightly wrong code. “Oh, goodness! It looks like I can’t get in! Oh me oh my. Well, I’ll just have to give my presentation without the Facebook images.”

Perfect if the instructor is Taiwanese: It’s not working for some reason …

For a non-Taiwanese, tell them you’re not sure what info exactly they are looking for: could they give you examples from their life (with photos)? While that is (not) going on, make something up to talk about since the FB password is still not working …

[quote=“GermanStereotype”]If she was forced to do it and had expressed her unwillingness to the teacher but nevertheless did it out of fear of grade or something,
this is enough to go request the univeristy to do something about it. Normal public university here in Taiwan has some sort of student affair board that deal with these kind of big student-teacher problem. The board’s aim is usually to make negotiation between the two side, and also is a protective measurement for student in case of unfair grading due to the problem occurred. The final aim of the board is of course try to end the problem before it go into court procedure.
But if the negotiation fails, the faculty board has the responsibility to investigate and resolve the problem.
However this is the situation in public university, and Fu-jen is a private catholitic one. So how they deal the problem is not known.

If, however, one side is not satisfied and considering the school’s decision being unfair, you can still go to court, or more complicated way, to call for the government authority.

The student is usually considered the innocent one by the society in this kind of cases, and the teacher being the abusive one.

In the end, asking here for help is not really helpful unless there is a lawyer here. If you both feel you can not tolerate it, then find a consultant in the school or in public law service, they would be more helpful.[/quote]

This is truly helpful. I know in FuRen they can send anonymous letters at the end of the semester to give their opinions on courses. For the moment we just hope this kind of things won’t go too far… and I try to teach my GF how to react properly to those kind of problems.

I was mainly curious if someone here had already encoutered this, and if it was illegal in some way. For this aspect your advice is most welcome and professionnal (if I dare say !)