Profit vs. Quality in Buxibans

Original Title: Fools

Actually, the corruption is weeded out by needy parents. Although schools only care about money, they are forced to care about the quality of the education they provide by the fact that some results are expected. Of course all schools place money first - anyone placing education first would be broke in a month.

Nah.

Parents don’t care about the actual results of education as much as the appearance of the results of education. A school that can teach kids to memorize a dozen questions and a single answer to that question will go far in parents’ eyes. A school that gives a kid a certificate for a level so parents can tell other people their child graduated from Level X of Have Name School will please the parents. A school where half a class is devoted to putting on a performance where kids are conditioned to parrot word for word what a teacher wants them to do will get recommendations.

No, the education system reinforces the idea that the really important thing is making it look like you’re doing well. Don’t lose face children. That’s what’s important.

You can place education first, bounded by the reasonable demands of financial constraints. You just have to remember to make it appear that you’re teaching the kids so that the parents can see it.

Even if parents cared about the education, most of them wouldn’t be able to tell whether it’s good or not. Most parents don’t speak enough English, if any at all.

Didn’t forget anything? Playing a lot of games, this way it looks like you’re really active in teaching the children … will please the children, buxiban owner and parents … good for the treasury … :laughing:

You can make profit and still teach well.

There isn’t necessarily a conflict.

Some of the best students I’ve assessed have come
from high profit schools. Some of the worst I’ve tested
have also come from such schools. What am I to make
of this?

What I make of it is that high profit schools are capable
of producing very good students. They’re also producing
students who aren’t so good.

Final answer: some kids do well, some don’t. Teachers
aren’t miracle workers.

[quote=“JBaroh”]Original Title: Fools

Actually, the corruption is weeded out by needy parents. Although schools only care about money, they are forced to care about the quality of the education they provide by the fact that some results are expected. Of course all schools place money first - anyone placing education first would be broke in a month.[/quote]

I cared about providing a quality educational product at a reasonable price in order to establish a successful business. A successful business makes money. You owe that to your staff, your students, and to yourself. Now that’s no longer my problem. I have free reign to do what is right for the education of the students and to teach. I have made a difference. I wish that everyone had the same opportunity.

I think it is important to remember that the desire/motivation to own schools is the profit margin. I am not doing this out of the goodness of my heart…

…but the math is very easy

A quality product = money

[quote=“Durins Bane”]I think it is important to remember that the desire/motivation to own schools is the profit margin. I am not doing this out of the goodness of my heart…

…but the math is very easy

A quality product = money[/quote]

We actually did start out of the goodness of our hearts. But when a dozen or so people rely on you and your school for their income, so that they too can feed their families, and pay their bills, and several hundred rely on you to properly educate their children, things do change. The income and the balance sheet make themselves very high priorities.

I agree absolutely with the quality=money statement.

No you didn’t :blush: :laughing: , you did it for the money. :wink: Please…

Yes, there is that human aspect of things. I have a lot of people relying on the health of the school(s) and so it is my responsibility to make sure the business is thriving.

Wrong…

Wrong…[/quote]
Not just wrong, completely wrong. :noway: I would have a mass exodus from my school if we ever went that route. :no-no:

On Thursday afternoon, I had a conversation with a little 3-year-old girl. She came into my classroom last year after Chinese New Year with zero English. My school does well, but it’s not because they are making it look like their kids are successful. It’s because their kids are successful. Many of our kids go on to attend the international schools later on thanks to their immersion in English through preschool and maintenance of their English through our integrated language arts program for our kindergarten graduates up to grade 6.

Learning is not about putting on shows and speech competitions where kids only regurgitate a speech their teacher has rewritten (aka proofread) for them. We don’t display their work out on the street so that passersby can read it and be influenced to put their kids in our school (like countless other language schools who post cookie-cutter work by older students do), although we do put them in the traffic areas where our own students can see them so they can feel proud of their work.

Perhaps that’s why I have some negative vibes from schools like Hess which seem to center their programs and advertisements on such things. Where their kids talk like robots and look good, but it makes one wonder what exactly is original and what was spoonfed to them to impress their parents and potential customers.

Wrong…[/quote]
Not just wrong, completely wrong. :noway: I would have a mass exodus from my school if we ever went that route. :no-no:[/quote]

And of course, I will offer a 50% discount to any student who turns his/her Maoman’s bookbag to us when they sign up.

God, I hate putting on shows. We waste hours and hours of class time preparing for a show for the parents. Instead of doing a song that the children like and understand, which would be OK, the boss always chooses some impossibly difficult play that the children CANNOT understand, even when she tries to explain it to them. So then the teachers have to waste hours of time forcing little kids to memorize something completely meaningless and useless. Ahhhh!
And the parents seem to like it. Why? It’s a complete waste of time, time that their kids could be using to actually learn English.

Ah, the play. I remember that. :unamused: I was working for a kindergarten and she wanted them to do “The Gingerbread Man”. Never got around to practicing that. Thought it was just ludicrous. I did, however, play many games of snakes and ladders where the student got to roll the dice after they said “The Gingerbread Man” charcter names. I think I was doing it in order of their appearances in the story. I was usually still drunk from the night before so I don’t remember much. That was one of my first jobs in Taiwan. I wasn’t around for the play. Got fired for my “habit”. Don’t blame 'em.

3 words: Death before kindergarten.