Programs for the adult native learner (師大?)

I am Taiwanese born but overseas raised, always spoke Mandarin & Taiwanese to my parents at home, and even went to Chinese school to a 國2 level (but my reading & written ability is probably closer to 小5 or 小6 :blush: )

I would really like to improve my overall ability and am looking at programs in and around Taipei. I have heard that 師大 has a good program for Chinese learners but is it suitable for someone like myself? Or would a one-on-one tutor be more appropriate in my case?

Thanks and I look forward to hearing your suggestions

[quote=“She”]I am Taiwanese born but overseas raised, always spoke Mandarin & Taiwanese to my parents at home, and even went to Chinese school to a 國2 level (but my reading & written ability is probably closer to 小5 or 小6 :blush: )

I would really like to improve my overall ability and am looking at programs in and around Taipei. I have heard that 師大 has a good program for Chinese learners but is it suitable for someone like myself? Or would a one-on-one tutor be more appropriate in my case?

Thanks and I look forward to hearing your suggestions[/quote]

I would tend to think that with your background a once-a-week one-on-one with a tutor and lots of reading would be the best next step for you. You could choose books at your level on fun or interesting topics and discuss or ask questions about them with the tutor. If you find you are spending too much time looking words up in the dictionary, you could pick up some of the many publications from 國語日報 with “bopomo” phonetics beside the characters (although the range of subject matter might be a bit dry) – visit their bookstore on (I think) Ningpo West Road. You can also read online and cut-and-paste any characters that you don’t recognize into the Chinese version of MS Word, which has a function that automatically gives the bopomo for characters (highlight the character in question and click on “亞洲方式配置” in the 格式 menu). You can also cut and paste characters into the online 國語辭典 of the Ministry of eduction. Keep a notebook or file of all the terms you look up to build your vocabulary. Hope this is helpful.

Thank you, that was very helpful. I wish I had read more when I was younger but I always hated it… I am a slow reader too so I guess the two go hand in hand. You are right, I really do need practice :blush:

Do you have any suggestions on how to find a tutor/conversation partner here in the States? (not living in Taiwan at the moment) Or I guess I could read with my mum over Skype? :blush:

[quote=“She”]Thank you, that was very helpful. I wish I had read more when I was younger but I always hated it… I am a slow reader too so I guess the two go hand in hand. You are right, I really do need practice :blush:

Do you have any suggestions on how to find a tutor/conversation partner here in the States? (not living in Taiwan at the moment) Or I guess I could read with my mum over Skype? :blush:[/quote]

Some cities in the U.S. have branches of the Taiwan-based Chinese-language bookstore chain 世界書局
世界日報世界書局World Journal W.J.Bookstore. You can Google and see if there is one in your area. If you’re near a large University, you might inquire in the Chinese department about exchange students who might be interested in language teaching or exchange. Or perhaps there are US based alumni clubs or groups from Taiwanese Universities who might be able to point you in the right direction.

If you’re not so keen on reading books, you might consider buying Taiwanese/Chinese television series on DVDs. (They all have Chinese-language subtitles, and are easy to follow because of the recurring situations inherent in TV dramas and soaps. And you can hit pause and replay when you miss something.) I’ve been using using this method to study the Taiwanese (Minnan) language.

Reading with your mom over Skype also sounds like a good way to study while keeping in touch with her!