Queries over teaching jobs


#1

Hi,
After reading a few posts here, I’ve realised that people turn up untrained to teach in Taiwan and find a job!! How do they manage to do this if they are not trained? The reason I’m asking is that I want to help my girlfriends cousins to learn some english but have no idea where to start. Can anyone recommend a book or website where I can pick up tips on teaching novices. thanx


#2

What is their age and level? How often will you meet? What’s your budget? There are countless resources, but you need to know your students before you can begin selecting materials. Then you can mix and match to your heart’s content. Most of the materials found in places like Caves also have corresponding teacher’s books, so you can use those lesson plans for the first little while; eventually your own (probably better) ideas will blossom and the lps will become less imperative. Also, use realia as much as possible; they’ll remember vocabulary from the park much more if you take them there than if you show them a picture and a list of corresponding words, etc. Then again, I’m no expert; I’m just speaking from experience.

My favourite teaching in Taiwan site is Mike Turton’s Teaching English in Taiwan site.
users2.ev1.net/~turton/teach_index.html

Sorry about the earlier link mix-up; was checking out something a friend sent me. This is the real McCoy.


#3

Try Learning Teaching by Jim Scrivner pub. Macmillan Heinemann, and Teach Grammar by Scott Thornbury pub. Longman. They are on my book list for my CELTA course. Scrivner is used quite extensively throughout the course.


#4

There’s always the bible “Principles of Language Learning and Teaching”, H. Douglas Brown, Prentice Hall, 1994
ISBN: 0131919660
Easy to find in Taiwan bookstores.
Caves, Cranes, Lucky…etc.


#5

A book which I found useful was Principles of English Language Teaching by Jeremy Harmer, Third Edition, pub. (I think) Longman