Question about teaching English


#21

What does your son think of all this?


#22

As a parent of children and one who moved around many times when younger, a parent never should ask a child what he/she thinks about a major family decision.
My parents never did. They just said, “we’re moving” and went on about telling about what the new place would be (the positives, etc.)
Parents are there to do the right thing for their kids whenever something big happens. You can ask children about their feelings after the fact and try to help them through something like a big move as best as possible, but don’t get them involved in the decision beforehand. Let parents remain the adults and children remain the children. I’ve had more than enough experience at moving around to understand this topic quite well.


#23

IMO your best option is to get married (assuming you do love your partner, and expect him to be your lifelong partner; if not, do NOT get married!). After getting married, you can be in Taiwan on a spousal ARC with open work rights for as long as you want. You can work, or you can not work, up to you. This is the visa type I am on (also American, with a Taiwanese spouse), and I just went through the process about 18 months ago so feel free to PM me if you have specific questions. Also, your lack of a 4-year degree won’t matter if you have a lot of experience and area at management level, with a spousal ARC in hand. What matters at that point is: can you do the work, move the business forward, build successful teams, etc etc.

As for work, yes, you can go the English teacher route, but if you have substantial experience in IT/marketing (e.g. Director level), you may find that you would be valuable to a Taiwanese company or even an MNC operating here in Taiwan. There are absolutely positions out there which don’t require any Mandarin at all… I have one and know others in the same boat. But, it’s tricky. You sort of have to get lucky, work your network/connections, or kind of create your own position within your company. People take different tacks and there is no One True Road.

I don’t have kids so can’t advise you on that front, but as others have said, the big international schools are extremely expensive if you are on a local or close to local salary.


#24

When I was 13 and buckteethed, I got braces. I raged against my parents. “I hate this! How could you? It’s all your fault!!” blah blah blah, etc.

Now I think… thank god they did that for me so I’m not walking around looking like Bugs Bunny. Kids don’t always know what’s best for their development. If they did, we’d let them eat candy all day and never attend school.


#25

As a parent of children and one who moved around many times when younger, a parent never should ask a child what he/she thinks about a major family decision.
My parents never did. They just said, “we’re moving” and went on about telling about what the new place would be (the positives, etc.)
Parents are there to do the right thing for their kids whenever something big happens. You can ask children about their feelings after the fact and try to help them through something like a big move as best as possible, but don’t get them involved in the decision beforehand. Let parents remain the adults and children remain the children. I’ve had more than enough experience at moving around to understand this topic quite well.

Exactly! At his age, every decision we make is going to be bad for him – from his point of view.


#26

Yes! :grinning:


#27

We might indeed end up getting married. That’s sort of what we are leaning toward at this point.

Another thing that I thought of that I didn’t consider before is that 99.9% of the tasks I do at my current job can be done from anywhere, so it’s possible my employer would entertain the idea of allowing me to work from Taiwan. We have a very good relationship, so if/when I am certain we are moving regardless of the job situation, I will bring this up to them. Worst case, I can search for a job once I get there.

And thank you! I might PM you if we need some guidance on the spousal ARC process. :blush:


#28

Over the past couple days, he actually seems to be warming up to the idea a little bit.

He has some cousins in Taiwan and his grandparents who live here in LA with us would move back at the same time.


#29

To do that legally, you basically need to get married. Search for “digital nomad” threads for more info.


#30

I would recommend talking with your current employer, my wife and i decided to move to Taiwan as the opportunity’s for her are much better than in the uk.

I went about creating opportunity’s for myself through contacts i have in Taiwan already and though i would maybe teach a little part time, as i used to do it in other parts of Asia when i was young.

I let my company in the uk know what was happening after my last trip to Taiwan at Christmas. From then on i was working with my uk employer to set up new systems and get people in place to cover me when i left. During my last week of work the CEO and the Design manager decided they didn’t want me to leave the company.

It has taken us one week to negotiate a new contract, sort out all the uk legal issues, work out remote access to the system and set up a work flow that will allow for the time difference. you could easily do this in the 6 month time scale your looking at if your employer is willing.

I will now be working part time from Taiwan, still need to sort out the Taiwan side properly but i would defiantly recommend looking into this option.

To do this i think your only option is to get married. you have your reasons to not want to get married, but it sounds like you have the support of a good family who are willing to move with you. i wouldn’t like to say its a marriage of convenience but what ever your relationship has been for the last 15 years your still speaking and working together for the good of your family. that is much better than a lot of marriages i know.


#31

I’ve thought about it, but much of the US is the same situation that we face in LA. We have lived in other states in the past. Up until now, all he knows is the USA and he is taking a thuggish direction that we don’t approve of. What we really want is a more Eastern influence so he can get to know his Taiwanese heritage better. I realize that Taiwan is not perfect and that there are bad apples there like there are everywhere, but there are less of them and that type of behavior is not glamorized nearly as much as it is here.

He’s also part Japanese, and living in Taiwan would make visiting relatives in Japan easier, too.

Taiwan isn’t completely uncertain for us since my son’s father and uncle grew up there.


#32

When you get to Taiwan (or even now), perhaps think of enrolling him in some martial arts classes (qi gung, judo, etc). Our children take Taekwondo (yes, Korean, but very popular in Taiwan as some athletes have won medals at various summer Olympics). It helps “stabilize” them and teaches them to respect the teacher, to always listen, don’t fidget when sitting down in front of teacher, etc.


#33

Thanks for your input. It reinforces what I’ve been thinking over the past day. Hopefully my employer will be cooperative…


#34

Yes, we would definitely do something like that. He took tae kwon do when he was about 5 years old and I’m sure he’d like to try it again. I also want him to continue with the activities he’s been doing here: fishing and tennis.

The problems we have with him aren’t related to listening to teachers or doing school assignments, fortunately. He cares very much about his academic performance. The problems we have with him are more like passive-aggressive behind our backs defiance.


#35

Will do… thank you!


#36

So you need to submit 2 reports, one to get a family-based ARC and one to get a job at a buxiban. I did that 7 years ago and did not have to do it again for the APRC. Yet, I am changing jobs and the new employer is telling me I need to get one, have it translated and certified. As I understand it, this has to be done EACH TIME anyone changes schools. Damn. On a bureaucratic level, Taiwan takes the cake!


#37

I wonder what Janet ended up doing. Just to weigh in, getting married opens up all possibilities. The JFRV is so much more valuable than an ARC.

Hope she did it. How’s the kid doing? He should come play hockey with us.