Rant about horrible customer services in Taiwan (Immigration and everything in general)

Ok I am ABC (American born Chinese), and I got Taiwan citizenship a few years ago. To avoid getting drafted by the military I must leave Taiwan every 4 months. If I stay longer than 4 months (and up to three times) I will be drafted. So I have been leaving every four months.

Now all of a sudden when I visit the immigration they say I got one time that I stayed for longer than four month. Then next time when I go to immigration office to get the exit seal stamped, this OTHER branch of immigration office said I didn’t have any record of staying for longer than four month. The other branch made an error when they counted my duration of stay BEFORE I got the citizenship of Taiwan. Now last week I went to get the exit seal again and I wanted to double check, the girl said I have a record of staying for more than four months, then I explain to her oh I think the one time that happened before my citizenship doesn’t count, and she said she can’t see the details on her computer. And told me to check with military department. But I said last time when I got here, your co-worker next to you checked the pc and told me that I got zero record of the overstaying, how come you can’t see it? I think she just lazy or doesn’t want to help me and just kept on saying she can’t see it on her system. And kept on tell me to check with military department coz that’s their work. Her supervisor was looking the whole time and didn’t come forward, so I signaled her and she totally ignored me too. unbelievable. SO I waited for her co-worker and checked with her, sure enough she can see it in the pc and I got zero record.

Also before I called military department about my situation, because after a certain age you don’t need to leave the country anymore, and I am allow to have two times of staying longer than four months. But she said oh man she ain’t sure, I need to check with immigration coz that’s their work. Then when I checked with the immigration girl she said oh no you should contact with the military department. they keep on pushing their responsibilities to each other can you believe that?

Now in banks, or stores etc…their attitudes are just general bad vs USA. It’s pretty amzing I tell you, do you guys know what I am talking aboutt? horrible services and they don’t apologize. In the states you can check this thing on the phone, and they will explain everything in detail and with accuracy on the phone. Over here I went in person and they wont’ even help you. what the fuck? And they can’t even look into details and see things, two times by two diff staff they say I have the record of overstaying…both of them should be fired man! share your similar stories…I would like to hear

I don’t like to generalize, but in US I notice more commitment from the people on government or retail jobs to actually do a job well-done (except Walmart), versus the another day another dollar attitude that I have seen people here.

My wife and I had this conversation last Saturday after we went to one of those Momo events, where they try to sell you a silly teaching software for kids for 20k, and the lady that literally grabbed us at the door was a sad sad picture of somebody just trying to squeeze the money out of us. We talked a lot about the difference between regular Taiwan retail service and the US car-sales-man attitude in the US. I worked for about 10 years on costumer service and retail and I learn that making people happy is more profitable and less stressing, I guess is a code they still need to crack.

Well man those people definitely stressed me out and made me very unhappy. One time I lost the deed to my land and when i went to the office, my number was called, so I went to sit on my chair, she didn’t even look at me, didn’t say anything and just kept on doing her things like she is the boss. Then I guess it was my calmness and coolness ( I didn’t frown or say anything and just waited the patiently) so she dropped whatever she was doing and her face changed and asked me very nicely how can she help me. But then after everything was done, I guess her boss wanted to make sure that it was me and not some scammer that wanted to scam the land deed or soemthing. He asked about the school where I worked, then later commented that it’s a totally crap school with low quality students. He didn’t even say it indirectly he just said it out loud. I guess he wanted to make sure that it was me and not a scammer, wanted to see my reaction or soemthing to make sure, very inappropriate.

One time I went to the bank I saw this older lady who was asking questions about her balance and passbook info, she looks like a farmer and I think she is illiterate, and the banker just went like oh man I am already done with you, let me go to my next customer and was like trying to brush her off. Hello you are a banker shouldn’t you help out people who got questions? espeically who are illiterate? I don’t think she was repeating her questions and kept on bothering the baker…horrible services

Just on the news yesterday there were people who force you to buy pens and pencils near MRT stations or bus stations in Taipei, they were so aggressive people had to call cops on them. horrible and pathetic

On the contrary, I find Taiwan’s civil service employees to be exceptionally speedy and polite. I’m talking city government, foreign affairs police, immigration, the department of motor vehicles, etc. A virtual dream compared to what I experienced, and experience in the USA.

Personally I think the OP’s attitude is likely a major factor in the treatment he is getting. Purely subjective observation here, but I find it (the attitude) odious, self-important, and immature.

[quote=“Tomas”]On the contrary, I find Taiwan’s civil service employees to be exceptionally speedy and polite. I’m talking city government, foreign affairs police, immigration, the department of motor vehicles, etc. A virtual dream compared to what I experienced, and experience in the USA.

Personally I think the OP’s attitude is likely a major factor in the treatment he is getting. Purely subjective observation here, but I find it (the attitude) odious, self-important, and immature.[/quote]

My impression too, on both counts. I can’t compare with the US, but I find gov’t services here - and customer service in general - to be excellent, at least much better than you’d experience in the UK.

[quote=“Tomas”]On the contrary, I find Taiwan’s civil service employees to be exceptionally speedy and polite. I’m talking city government, foreign affairs police, immigration, the department of motor vehicles, etc. A virtual dream compared to what I experienced, and experience in the USA.

Personally I think the OP’s attitude is likely a major factor in the treatment he is getting. Purely subjective observation here, but I find it (the attitude) odious, self-important, and immature.[/quote]

Agreed.

Well hopefully I can dig enough as to get that great attention, personally I sometimes need to pull my wife sleeve when she complains about stuff and she is a local, literally, she was born less than 1 km from where we live now, not that she is a pain in the ass but I probably identify myself with the employee more than her.

Is not really self importance, I know what you mean about people that think they deserve everything, but really I have seen this lack of professionalism in a lot of retail places and restaurants. Like asking questions to a retailer while she or him is poking her nose while looking at you in the eyes. Another time we where browsing on some t-shirts and the old guy in charge took the shirt I was showing my wife out of my hand to fold it and put it back, that kind of stuff is new to me. Also at NIA they never talk to me, but my wife, I tell stuff to my wife to ask them, but before she repeats or translate they answer her back meaning that they understand what I say but won’t answer back to me in fact the very last time we sat, the person in charge made sure her computer monitor was between our faces at all times. And don’t get me started on the post office but that actually is as horrible as back in the US.

In the other hand yes I have had good service in a lot of places, but nothing to write home, like in the library, or police station. Or few eating places. As I said I don’t like generalizing but please don’t just say everybody is wonderful. Just like in US there a ton of pricks you need to deal with on a daily basis.

I always try to call my wife attention on what is acceptable behavior at a work place, depending on the venue, not like is all we do, but a lot of time I got assignments for training people on costumer service, is some kind of mindset.
Long time ago my manager, a guy from HK, told me about how in HK they don’t give a crap about the costumer, the “you don’t like? Don’t come back” philosophy versus the “You wrong me” attitude in the US, I met a ton of scammers abusing that already over the top attitude.

If there’s a draft, I’m in the ‘suck-it-up-and-do-it’ camp. Free fitness training for a year. Plus, especially in Taiwan, the boys are boys until they come out and then all of a sudden they’re men - if it wasn’t for the army training, a large portion of them would be unbearable immature twerps at 30.

But I think there should be basic military training in all countries for all sexes. Get everybody off their asses, working together and working hard for a year - if you do it right, it can only be positive for overall EQ and productivity. There are times when conforming is good, the trick is to figure out when those are.

Anyway. OP, you should have done what the locals do and rang up the military office from your cell right in front of the immigration officer and told them to speak to each other. And take a chill pill, things can all be fine as long as you’re chilled about them.

Your own attitude when dealing with the govt folks can make a difference too, just sayin.

And serving in the TW military is probably a lot safer then serving in the US military.

So if you want the citizenship dont be afraid to do the time.

[quote=“tsukinodeynatsu”]If there’s a draft, I’m in the ‘suck-it-up-and-do-it’ camp. Free fitness training for a year. Plus, especially in Taiwan, the boys are boys until they come out and then all of a sudden they’re men - if it wasn’t for the army training, a large portion of them would be unbearable immature twerps at 30.

But I think there should be basic military training in all countries for all sexes. Get everybody off their asses, working together and working hard for a year - if you do it right, it can only be positive for overall EQ and productivity. There are times when conforming is good, the trick is to figure out when those are.

Anyway. OP, you should have done what the locals do and rang up the military office from your cell right in front of the immigration officer and told them to speak to each other. And take a chill pill, things can all be fine as long as you’re chilled about them.[/quote]

No way. That army training was also used to turn them into compliant drones. What a waste of time and tax money. Much better that they go to Australia for a year pissing about.

OP, you would have been hauled off already in the old days. You might have to do the time.

Well, she did say, “if you do it right”.
um.
Yes.
I see what you mean.

[quote=“tsukinodeynatsu”]If there’s a draft, I’m in the ‘suck-it-up-and-do-it’ camp. Free fitness training for a year. Plus, especially in Taiwan, the boys are boys until they come out and then all of a sudden they’re men - if it wasn’t for the army training, a large portion of them would be unbearable immature twerps at 30.

But I think there should be basic military training in all countries for all sexes. Get everybody off their asses, working together and working hard for a year - if you do it right, it can only be positive for overall EQ and productivity. There are times when conforming is good, the trick is to figure out when those are.

Anyway. OP, you should have done what the locals do and rang up the military office from your cell right in front of the immigration officer and told them to speak to each other. And take a chill pill, things can all be fine as long as you’re chilled about them.[/quote]

Most of the 18 years old boys will mature during those years with and without the Army. The US doesn’t have any mandatory drafting, so Americans are all spineless whimps/wimps or what?

It takes more determination staying away from the Army than to just simply comply. There are enough sheep running around already.

To the OP.
Be careful! Out of my own experience, the Army might try all kinds of tricks to draft you anyway.
If the laws here in Taiwan are similar to the laws in Germany. In this case, the official draft will be an order you received from the Army.
If you don’t comply with the order, you are subject to criminal charges.

It could be that the Army can give you an Order only if you stayed continuously for more than 4 month in Taiwan.
If they manage to keep you for any reason here in Taiwan pass that 4 month, the Army can give you an Order and it won’t matter much why you were here in the first place.

If they do draft you, you could simply refuse to do anything or follow any orders so that they kick you out due to their frustration.

I have flat feet and a crock back ( :whistle: nah).Yup I know a couple of “guys” (my bros in law) and all of their friends did their military service a couple of years ago and they still spend all day in their room playing games online, we had live in the same house for 6 months and I have talk to one of them less than 5 minutes if you put all our interactions together, they are mommy boys. The funny thing is the wife and I are planning on moving to another city and “quiet guy” want to move with us, lol.

The draft & taxes are two things it seems like Taiwanese are scared shitless of. I don’t understand why a man would spend decades of money, time, and energy to avoid one boring year (and change) of his life.

I served 2 years in the army during my days. Those were wonderful years. Then again, I was a 2nd LT, so I got to yell at the soldiers. But, if you can serve, you should go and you will have a wonderful memory forever. Some general once said, he wouldn’t live thru his cadet life again for a million dollars; but he wouldn’t sell that memory for a million dollars either.

I found Taiwan civil service people very polite and very helpful, maybe I get more respect here since mostly I am old enough to be their father.

[quote=“suiken”]Ok I am ABC (American born Chinese), and I got Taiwan citizenship a few years ago. To avoid getting drafted by the military I must leave Taiwan every 4 months. If I stay longer than 4 months (and up to three times) I will be drafted. So I have been leaving every four months.
[/quote]

  1. You look like them, so they treat you as they treat everyone else.
  2. You’re trying to get out of serving in the military, so there may be some resentment towards you.
  3. They’re government employees.

They dont kick you out. They put you in a military jail.

I often feel conflicted when dealing with customer service. You often get very polite people who are really trying to help you sort something out that shouldn’t have been screwed up in the first place if anyone was half professional.

They dont kick you out. They put you in a military jail.[/quote]

That’s still better than being forced into becoming a [strike]trained violent killer[/strike] soldier. :wink:

Seriously, forcing someone to join the army against their will is a blatant human rights violation. And the pres did just talk about human rights earlier this week, so …