Ray Nagin's "Chocolate" city is on the verge of a meltdown

[quote]New Orleans had one of the nation’s highest murder rates before Katrina and still does. In 2006, 161 people were killed, giving the city a murder rate more than four times the national average, according to FBI statistics.

There have been 8 murders since Jan. 1., with the recent killings of a local musician and a female documentary film-maker in particular sparking anger.[/quote]

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N11171577.htm

I’m sitting watching Nagin on tv, still blaming the Katrina crisis for this murder wave. And I wonder, how did a city who was on some level, failed by his inability to utilize what was offered to him, re-elect him?

What is this man’s goal for the office of Mayor?

He’s a proud graduate of the Marion Berry School of Public Administrators.

Nice try, but I don’t think Nagin enrolled in the course “Crack, Hos, and VideoTapes” :laughing:

A better question is why the city lacks the talent to have a replacement for Nalgin. This is a city that was failing before Katrina and now uses Katrina for any reason they are deficient.

His goal as mayor is to enrich himself and maybe go to a higher paying and more powerful position. As long as he can direct the feelings of the city and he does that well with all the free press, then he pretty much sets the agenda. Oprah Winphrey has already absolved him of any responsibility from Hurricane Katrina. What else does the man really need?

Cheers,
Okami

The MSM will never revisit The Katrina Goof up. It would cast a far too critical eye on how they do things. Hence the decline of traditional media and the rise of alternatives thanks to disruptive technologies.

why that city lacks the talent? hey, the whole state of louisiana voted in a fat incompetent bitch for governor over Bobby Jindahl. go figure.

what you may not know about Katrina (FYI):

service pipelines cross the coast of Louisiana like a maze. putting in all those pipes destroyed all the coral over the past 40 years. coral is a wave barrier.

the levee system carries silt out to sea rather than depositing itself in the marshes like it should if the Mississipi were allowed to flood naturally. the marshes are deprived of silt and the ocean ate them away putting NO closer to the gulf.

LSU warned about this shit for years to no avail.

and who do we blame? God. yes all of this is a sign of the end times so we (louisianians) sit around with our thumbs up our ass and do nothing.

highest murder rate and also only 11,000 dollars per yer per capita. average.

the fact that i can’t speak cajun says it all. the louisiana government has always been a farce. most corrupt state in the US. feds go down there, feds end up floating in a river. i’ve heard all kinds of shit.

but she cried real purty on TV during the big un.

:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

but then again so did the mayor…

:blush: :blush: :blush:

these characters had no vision for louisiana. bubbas destroyed our french culture. the anglo protestants made louisiana an ugly racist state, destroying french catholic traditions of tolerance and integration. their "tee totalling " (could say it couldn’t do it) judgement of the catholic cajuns for their love of “joyeaux d’ vivre” (the joy of life) which included drink and dance killed our culture systematically. my mother’s generation was punished for saying cajun words. you wanna hear cajun nowadays, go down to the nursing home and hear it babeled, only to be squelched by some 6 dollar an hour nurse telling him to say English. God Damn It!!!

what does it say on the louisiana license plate? sportsman’s paradise. we were sold out for out of state hunting and fishing licenses. make it comfortable for out of state bubbas. Damn them!

people go out to festivals and turn their noses up at the good cajun music being played. it’s all about crawfish and beer. damn WASPS!

My great aunt lived in New Orleans so I spent quite a lot of time in New Orleans. To me, it is just about as close to a crumbling capital of a West African nation as you are going to get, and the corruption, patronage, incompetence and general air of decay are right there as well.

In the aftermath of Katrina:

[quote=""Governors lose in power struggle over National Guard"]A little-noticed change in federal law packs an important change in who is in charge the next time a state is devastated by a disaster such as Hurricane Katrina.

To the dismay of the nation’s governors, the White House now will be empowered to go over a governor’s head and call up National Guard troops to aid a state in time of natural disasters or other public emergencies. Up to now, governors were the sole commanders in chief of citizen soldiers in local Guard units during emergencies within the state.

A conflict over who should control Guard units arose in the days after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. President Bush sought to federalize control of Guardsmen in Louisiana in the chaos after the hurricane, but Gov. Kathleen Blanco (D) refused to relinquish command.

Over objections from all 50 governors, Congress in October tweaked the 200-year-old Insurrection Act to empower the hand of the president in future stateside emergencies. In a letter to Congress, the governors called the change “a dramatic expansion of federal authority during natural disasters that could cause confusion in the command-and-control of the National Guard and interfere with states’ ability to respond to natural disasters within their borders.”[/quote]

Jaboney:

Many thanks for posting that. This is EXACTLY what I was saying during the crisis over Hurricane Katrina. Pity that just because one state has a fuckup administration that all the other governors are going to have to face the increased bureaucracy of dealing with federal control. The states are best placed to handle this on their own, but because of Louisiana (why not Texas? Mississippi? Arkansas? Florida?) there will be now a one-size fits all approach and that is a pity. It is obviously going to slow down responses elsewhere and this is a true tragedy.

[quote=“fred smith”]Jaboney:

Many thanks for posting that. This is EXACTLY what I was saying during the crisis over Hurricane Katrina. Pity that just because one state has a fuckup administration that all the other governors are going to have to face the increased bureaucracy of dealing with federal control. The states are best placed to handle this on their own, but because of Louisiana (why not Texas? Mississippi? Arkansas? Florida?) there will be now a one-size fits all approach and that is a pity. It is obviously going to slow down responses elsewhere and this is a true tragedy.[/quote]

It’s not so much a tragedy as it is a sign of how much control the federal governement is looking to have in the States. While I can agree with their approach, I still don’t see the necessary need for such a move. It’s like trying to cause and create preventive measures well AFTER the occurance of the problem.

federal occupation of a state. against state’s rights theory.

Slow & Greasy in the Big Easy…

[url=http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070117/D8MN7NVO1.html]The French Quarter Is in a Funk
Jan 17, 2:41 PM (ET), By CAIN BURDEAU

NEW ORLEANS (AP) - The hookers are back on Bourbon Street. So are the drug dealers, the strippers with names like Rose and Desire, the out-of-town businessmen, the college students getting blitzed on candy-colored cocktails and beer in plastic cups.

But a closer look reveals things are not back to the way they were in the French Quarter. Sixteen months after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ liveliest, most exuberant neighborhood is in a funk.

“The money’s not the same. I remember when I made $1,200 a night,” said Elizabeth Johnson, a manager and dancer at a Bourbon Street strip club, frowning at another slow night. “I know girls who used to never let people touch them, and now they’re resorting to prostitution.”

Robert Boudreaux, a beefy hotel bellman in an olive green vest, scanned the street with folded arms and said: “Very boring.”

The Quarter still has its characters - palm readers, magicians, street musicians, mimes. But the cheap fun is largely confined to the weekends these days, and seven-day-a-week stores, restaurants and clubs such as Preservation Hall are cutting back on their hours. The nonstop party is no more.

The “cams” - real-time camera footage of Bourbon Street, shown over the Internet - are dull on weekdays. Dixieland bands play to empty barrooms.

“The Quarter rats are drunk and high still, but they’re less drunk,” said bartender Dawn Kesslering.[/url]

Yeah. NOW it is finally dawning on people. I stated this from the very beginning but oh no it was all Bush’s fault that Louisiana and New Orleans were suffering despite minimal problems and certainly no complaints about the federal response in the neighboring four states. NOW, guess what? We will all face a more bureaucratic response to disasters because of one fucked up state. Thanks Louisiana. Now, we can all descend to the same West African-nation standards that have characterized your administration. Welcome to Haiti! Why won’t this state secede? This time I guarantee NO ONE will fight to keep you in the union.