Really "old skool" no gi grappling

For the mixed martial arts, Brazilian jiu jitsu or submission grappling folks, here is an interesting movie from 1905 of really “Old Skool” no gi rolling.
youtube.com/watch?v=aQzwWLzGr8w

yours in martial arts history,
Brian
p.s. thanks to Tim Cartmell for pointing this movie out.

I liked that guy that kept spinning on his head.

I wonder what they were wrestling for. Position? Submission? Some kind of points?

That was interesting. Remarkably similar to wrestling today. I guess that shouldn’t be a surprise – the sport’s been around for eons – but the moves looked the same as what I learned.

[quote=“miltownkid”]I liked that guy that kept spinning on his head.

I wonder what they were wrestling for. Position? Submission? Some kind of points?[/quote]

It looked like scholastic wrestling (as opposed to greco roman or freestyle) to me, but the head spinning thing looked more like freestyle. I never did freestyle, but I understand one can score points for exposing the other’s back even if it’s a foot off the mat. That’s what it looked like to me: that one guy was trying to expose the other’s back and the other was spinning to avoid it.

Looks like a “Athletic Club” demonstration. The guy in the white tights appears to be the instructor. Greco-Roman technique displays for the camera.

No offense intended, but that definitely wasn’t greco. Greco roman wrestling involves upper body hold and throws and forbids attacks to the legs, which were abundant in the video.

Perhaps I was a bit rushed in my comment. Allow me to rephrase:

“Looks like a “Athletic Club” demonstration. The guy in the white tights appears to be the instructor. Greco-Roman and free-style(a term I’m not certain even existed at the time of this filming) technique displays for the camera.”

Looks like catch wrestling

I have no idea what style or rules is being shown. I know the place, the New York Athletic Club, because one of the early American boxing manuals was written by a boxer named Mike Donovan and he taught at that club in the 1890s.

“Back in the day” (i.e. the late 1800s to about 1920) wrestling was taught (to adults) as sport, exercise and a form of self defense.

Casey, yeah, the dude doing the head spins caught my eye too, in fact that was one of the first things I noticed.

take care,
Brian

the wiki has a bit on this guy that trained at the club
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Quinn

Joseph Quinn

Although reportedly described as a pimp and rival Five Points thug, Quinn is described in newspaper accounts as “…a respectable young man, who for nine years past has been employed at the Cotton Exchange.” A well known local athlete, he was a skilled amateur wrestler as a member of the Pastime and New York Athletic Clubs, whose career included winning the latter organization’s spring competition as well as the State Championship’s middleweight catch-as-catch-can wrestler. He also appeared at the first exhibition held by the Crib Club on April 9, 1885 in a catch-as-catch-can wrestling match with fellow Pastime Club member John O’Brien both scoring a fall each.

He would again face O’Brien in a catch-as-catch-can match, with each man gaining a pinfall before a draw was declared after wrestling another 10 minutes for the deciding third fall at an exhibition held by the New York Athletic Club on December 10, 1885