Recording tapes on hard/crive or cd?

Hi, I need to (or rather would very much like to) record an old tape I found onto CD, so I need to somehow convert it and get the music onto my hard-drive, is there a way to do this? Thanks a lot!! Xpet.

(I did searches using the search terms “record”, “tape”, “to”, “CD” and “copy”, “tape”, “to”, “CD” - no relevant results …)

I assume you mean cassette tape and not video tape correct?

I’ve never done it, but one way would be to just hook your stereo/walkman up to the computer via the line/mic jack and record it with the recorder that comes with windows. That should put it into wave format and you can convert to MP3 from there.

hitsquad.com/smm/news/1316/

reviews.cnet.com/4520-6450_7-502 … egacy=cnet

I searched cassette to mp3 (no quotes) on google. There are a bunch more.

Hi mtk, that sounds easy enough … I shall try it tonight! And yes, it’s an old audio tape of course, should have made that clearer. And before anyone starts barking up the wrong tree, it’s original music I recorded myself, so no copy-right issues here … :wink:

I didn’t know there’s a sound-recorder packaged with Windows, I assume it’s under accessories or so? I’ll have a look, thanks! Xpet.

Yeah, I think it’s called recorder (it’s been a long time sense I had English Windows).

Recorder will stop recording after 60 seconds. It’s going to work fine if you have short snippets on a tape. If you want to record longer songs, you’re going to have to use some other type of software.

Though many software development companies charge for their products, there are some free apps available at http://download.com. I’ve tried out Quartz AudioMaster Freeware and I believe it would work fine for your project.

There’s no reason to change the recording into an MP3 format. From my experience the CD burning software will convert the file to CD format. If you change the file to MP3 before you change it to CD format, the sound quality will be decreased. In addition, it is getting quite difficult to find a free way to encode in MP3 format because it is owned and you now must pay royalties to the MP3 company to use that format. That is why most of the links in the “cassette tape to MP3” search are dead.

twocs, thanks, I was wondering what was up with that! Interesting … If by conversion to mp3 the quality decreases I probably shouldn’t do it anyway as it’s an amateur recording with pretty lo-fi sound quality to begin with … Thanks for the tip!! Xpet.

I use and like Audacity;
audacity.sourceforge.net/
Free. Very useful. Lots of features. Not difficult to use. Crashes occasionally on my computer though. Remember to save regularly.

Agree that you shouldn’t be converting to MP3 if you’re making CDs. Record in 44.1khz stereo WAV format then you won’t lose quality.

Watch out for clipping distortion due to input levels too high. You can see this on the waveform – “squared-off” wave tops and bottoms. You can also hear it as nasty grating distortion. Either download a separate level meter or just experiment by recording at different levels.

My experience is not good to convert tape to media files into computer. It got nosie all the music. Maybe it is because my transfer cable is not good enough to get better music.

So, if you have better connector and cable, maybe it will sound better…

It’s just a suggestion.

[quote=“tiebob”]My experience is not good to convert tape to media files into computer. It got nosie all the music. Maybe it is because my transfer cable is not good enough to get better music.

So, if you have better connector and cable, maybe it will sound better…

It’s just a suggestion.[/quote]

You should use a tape deck instead of a cheap walkman, make sure the connectors are well connected, and a good quality original tape recording. You need to set up the levels so that you’re not clipping the signal or recording it too quietly. The quality of your soundcard comes into question if you don’t have SoundBlaster or anything except the soundcard on the motherboard. And finally if your computer isn’t grounded you might get some kind of noise because you’re using a two prong plug, not a three prong one.