Retiring in Taiwan

I am 55 and greatly enjoyed my 2 weeks in Taiwan last fall. It was every bit as enchanting as I thought it would be, although I understand some of that was the “puppy love” of a first visit. But as I stood in Jiufen, overlooking the Pacific, I found myself wondering…Could I retire here? I would be happy with a clean, well-lighted 500-800 square feet not too far from things. I was completely floored by the friendly people everywhere I went in Taipei, Keelung and Tamdui/Danshui…So now I am starting to think more about this…

Any retirees on this list?

[quote=“BeachBoy”]I am 55 and greatly enjoyed my 2 weeks in Taiwan last fall. It was every bit as enchanting as I thought it would be, although I understand some of that was the “puppy love” of a first visit. But as I stood in Jiufen, overlooking the Pacific, I found myself wondering…Could I retire here? I would be happy with a clean, well-lighted 500-800 square feet not too far from things. I was completely floored by the friendly people everywhere I went in Taipei, Keelung (Jilong) and Tamdui/Danshui…So now I am starting to think more about this…

Any retirees on this list?[/quote]
Well I would like to retire,but I just seem to get busier in Taiwan. There are so many more opportunities here,it’s difficult. Two weeks is not long enough to get a real idea of living in Taiwan IMO.The People are sometimes incredible and they can be frustrating too.There are some really beautiful places on the Island and there are some completely awful areas. It’s a real mix. Loving Taiwan, may depend on the lifestyle you had before as there are certain parts of “Western” culture that are not available. If you are willing to take the rough with the smooth,you may love it. Try it out,maybe, for a little longer before you make a decision.
Read the posts on Living in Taiwan for a balanced view !

I will be eventually. But I agree you need much more than 2 weeks to get a good impression. I’ve spent a lot of time there, first for work then for leisure after meeting my wife there. There’s a dirtier side to the island you don’t always see in a brief visit and many simple things can be a total PITA to get done. Retirement is about 15 years away for me so things could always change but Taiwan is our planned destination for now.

Whoop de doo, your an old guy! Most kiddy schools wont want you because of age. Screw 'em. They don’t know what they are missing. It’s cool for students to see a young kid with cutoff, sandals and weird hair. They don’t pay the tuition. Mom and pop do. That’s the important class.
You have 2 factors so out front that most can’t even see it.
You have the “grandpa/grandma factor” and you have the a professional appearance (assuming nice clothes)
Kids don’t pay the bill. Mom and dad do. I always make sure that mom and/or dad get to view one class en situ. If they don’t pay, assuming you know your crap, I would be surprised.
Bottom line, we all get old. I am older than you and I work 7 days per week and turn down classes. Just use what you have and come to Taiwan. We need old farts like you and me.

[quote=“2Enigma”]Whoop de doo, your an old guy! Most kiddy schools wont want you because of age. Screw 'em. They don’t know what they are missing. It’s cool for students to see a young kid with cutoff, sandals and weird hair. They don’t pay the tuition. Mom and pop do. That’s the important class.
You have 2 factors so out front that most can’t even see it.
You have the “grandpa/grandma factor” and you have the a professional appearance (assuming nice clothes)
Kids don’t pay the bill. Mom and dad do. I always make sure that mom and/or dad get to view one class en situation. If they don’t pay, assuming you know your crap, I would be surprised.
Bottom line, we all get old. I am older than you and I work 7 days per week and turn down classes. Just use what you have and come to Taiwan. We need old farts like you and me.[/quote]

OP did not mention getting a retirement job. Maybe he has enough funds for retirement in Taiwan? If he is a US citizen, there are some retirement considerations such as health care cost, and FATCA.

I am a dual citizen (Taiwan & US). I am similar in age right now, and I am not retired yet mainly because of the uncertainty of US health care new law (PPACA, aka Obamacare). I plan to retire in both places with few months in each place. My estimated living expenses are quite similar between the 2 places, because I have to add the airfare to and from Taiwan, plus I plan to pay health care in two countries.

When I get passed 65 or older, I will have a decision to make in which place to stay permanently. My wife and I are thinking of staying in Taiwan because of the low cost of long-term care but my children are likely to stay in US, so we will make that decision when we get much older.

We all need more money. The OP is near retirement age and when you get there, you will realize that the money is nice but staying busy keeps you alive.

Thanks for your comments all. Yes, I was thinking about working in my retirement as an English teacher: I also have a law degree, although I hope Taiwan never has the flood of lawyers America does.

I would be happy volunteering part-time at the National Palace Museum too.

Thanks for your comments all. Yes, I was thinking about working in my retirement as an English teacher: I also have a law degree, although I hope Taiwan never has the flood of lawyers America does.

I would be happy volunteering part-time at the National Palace Museum too.

Funny thing! I was just told I was overqualified to teach English in Taiwan! I guess it’s the 24 years practicing law!

I think they meant ‘you’re too much hassle’, because you haven’t got any teaching qualifications, or certainly no experience, if you’ve been lawyering for decades? :laughing:

As an English teacher in Taiwan, I consider myself semi retired and loving it. Even working only 24 hours each week gives me more income than most office hacks and it is plenty enough to live on.

Now if I could just convince my girlfriend…

That’s not true! Every hearing or oral argument before a court is a kind of lecture!

I couldn’t think of a worse place on earth to retire to although Im sure parts of India or Africa might be equally shit ! This is a great place to come to when your in your 20s if you want to go out on the piss and work on the local females but THIS IS NO PLACE to retire. :loco: :loco: You might want to consider Thailand with its superior beaches and lots of Western comforts like proper food stuffs in the supermarket.Good luck!

That is entirely a matter of perspective. Taiwan ranks #1 on my list of places to retire. I plan to leave in the next few years but will undoubtedly be back. Rural areas of Tainan, Hualien, Taichung, or Taoyuan top the list of places I’d want to buy and old farm house and raise a pack of 小黑.

Can anyone shed any light on pensions 勞退 here? I’ve worked here for the majority of my adult life and my HR department is saying I should be eligible for a pension. I honestly wasn’t aware of this and I would like to ask more about it.

Malaysia a much better place to retire. Much cheaper airfares to nearby countries. Lower COL. Speak English. Multicultural (this is important). Good medical and cheap. Once you stay in a decent condo in Penang you will quickly realize you can’t have that lifestyle anywhere else.

There’s a discussion here:

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Have you gone back to your HR to explain things?
Get them to work for the money that your company pays them. :sunglasses:

And always take the 1-time payout. Don’t take the layaway.

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