Rev. Al and Strom: The biggest non story in years

[quote]NEW YORK – The Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday it was the “most shocking” news of his life to learn he was a descendant of a slave owned by relatives of Strom Thurmond, the late senator who once led the segregationist South.

“I couldn’t describe the emotions that I’ve had over the last two or three days thinking about this,” the civil-rights leader said in a solemn address to reporters at a news conference. “Everything from anger and outrage to reflection, and to some pride and glory.”[/quote]
latimes.com/la-na-sharpton26 … d-homepage

[quote]
They discovered that Sharpton’s great-grandfather, Coleman Sharpton, was a slave owned by Julia Thurmond, whose grandfather was Strom Thurmond’s great-great-grandfather.[/quote]

Well, hell, they had to be owned by SOMEBODY right?

My Grandma had her genealogy done and found that her side of family came from England!

The HORROR!!


“SAY WHAT?..Ain’t dis a bi…”


“Did I tell you to ask for reparations?”

I liked Al in Mr Deeds. ‘For goodness sake, let’s all have some cake.’

Maybe his worry is that he is descended from the whities themselves. The duality of being who he is, and then having blood relatives who led the slave movement must be hard for him to deal with.

[quote=“TomHill”]I liked Al in Mr Deeds. ‘For goodness sake, let’s all have some cake.’

Maybe his worry is that he is descended from the whities themselves. The duality of being who he is, and then having blood relatives who led the slave movement must be hard for him to deal with.[/quote]

I was thinking the same thing. Maybe a Jeffersonian twig in the family tree there. Might explain the hair.

[quote=“jdsmith”][quote=“TomHill”]I liked Al in Mr Deeds. ‘For goodness sake, let’s all have some cake.’

Maybe his worry is that he is descended from the whities themselves. The duality of being who he is, and then having blood relatives who led the slave movement must be hard for him to deal with.[/quote]

I was thinking the same thing. Maybe a Jeffersonian twig in the family tree there. Might explain the hair.[/quote]

If your Granny came from England then she will be a good old fashioned inbreed like the rest of us. Them’s were dark days on them lonely old farms!!!

I don’t really think it’s a non-story. Anyone would be unnerved to think they’re related to a nutty segregationist like Thurmond, especially so if the connection was evidently through a raped slave girl. I know the report doesn’t say directly that they’re related, only that they have a connection, but he must be thinking it - he’s asked for DNA tests, after all.

[quote=“TomHill”]I liked Al in Mr Deeds. ‘For goodness sake, let’s all have some cake.’

Maybe his worry is that he is descended from the whities themselves. The duality of being who he is, and then having blood relatives who led the slave movement must be hard for him to deal with.[/quote]

Read the story. Al isn’t related to Strom in any manner. His great grandfather was a slave owned by Strom’s great great grandaddy. Al’s hair is that way because he uses a relaxer to straighten it.

Al found out because some reporter asked him if he was up for it. But he’s not related.

Although, Strom did seem to keep up with the trends of that time, fwakin around with the help- he got a 16 family maid preggers and she had a kid.

End of the day, the story is a non story. But would make for good comedy material.

but… we don’t know if they are related. think the rev. is up for a DNA test?

I wonder why so many Blacks in South Carolina voted for Strom Thurmond throughout his career?

[quote=“bababa”]
especially so if the connection was evidently through a raped slave girl.[/quote]

Any proof someone was raped?

Family tradition maybe… :astonished:

I wonder why so many Blacks in South Carolina voted for Strom Thurmond throughout his career?

[quote=“bababa”]
especially so if the connection was evidently through a raped slave girl.[/quote]

Any proof someone was raped?[/quote]
No. But I generally assume that girls who were kept as sex slaves were not willing participants.

I wonder why so many Blacks in South Carolina voted for Strom Thurmond throughout his career?

[quote=“bababa”]
especially so if the connection was evidently through a raped slave girl.[/quote]

Any proof someone was raped?[/quote]
No. But I generally assume that girls who were kept as sex slaves were not willing participants.[/quote]

So, let me get this right, Rev. Al’s great grandfather was a transgendered girl sex slave? They must have had better surgical techniques back then if he/she was then able to conceive a child after being raped.

Sharpton wants DNA testing done. He must therefore think he and Thurmond have ancestors in common. I’ve read - and common sense would indicate - that mixed-race children on slave plantations were rarely the result of a male slave having consensual sex with a white woman. More often they were the result of a female slave having sex with a white man - her owner or relatives of her owner. Who could possibly call this consensual?

I didn’t read anywhere that Sharpton’s great grandfather was a “mixed-race” child. To me it sounds like someone trying to make a story out of a non-story. Gotta get as much time in the press as possible.

I really don’t know what history books you are reading, but more of than not, the case on plantations was that Masa tended to dip into the well for his own personal pleasure, whether the slave was willing or not. You have to remember that slave owners did not see slaves as humans but as functional property for their own personal use and whims.

As for so many blacks voting for Strom, I would guess that it wasn’t only family or community practice, but you have to take in account that the education level (up to a certain period) wasn’t high, and illegal voting practices (anyone who disagress, don’t act like it didn’t happen) are two reasons I can think of along with the mentality of party loyalities (:roll:)

In our sexist society, who could possibly call sex between men and women consensual?

(Some feminist–I forget which–actually did make this argument in all seriousness.)