Scooter Advice

I’ve got a couple questions. Any help would be appreciated.

  1. What is a

Take the MRT; it’s a lot safer.

I live in Kaohsiung, and in five years I will take the MRT. Until then I’m stuck with my hunk of junk two-wheeler. :laughing:

Piston broke ?

yeah, me too.

[quote=“mfaass”]I’ve got a couple questions. Any help would be appreciated.

  1. What is a

Perhaps a useful piece of information in understanding my problem is that it was a used scooter. So perhaps the valve damage didn’t initially occur with me, and was actually caused by the previous owner. This is something I would have assumed that the scooter shop had looked into, before selling me this bike.

I’ve got a Yamaha 125 so I would assume it’s four stroke, although I couldn’t tell you about inlet or outlet. Maybe I can find a schematic somewhere and post it.

Yes, if the

I think you’ve just got to accept the bike was made in Taiwan and is just not going to last forever. The oily bits of some bikes are made in Japan and assembled here, and they tend to last longer and cost more to fix. Having said that, a lot of bikes do last a long time and are easy and cheap to fix. Swings and roundabouts. In addition, bikes in Taiwan are very poorly maintained in general.

BTW, if you are changing the oil, rather than just topping it up when the red light comes on, it’s a four stroke.

Buy a new bike every two years. If you get an expensive bike like a Majesty, you’ll spend around $75k. You’ll have one year under warranty, and probably another year without any problems. After 2 years, you can probably get back 50% of the value in a trade-in when you buy another one. So after the initial (not inconsiderable expense), the cost of having a large, very new, very reliable, shiny scooter is approximately $1,500NT/month, plus gas and basic maintenance. Scooters are faster than any other mode of transportation in town, and they’re a heck of a lot cheaper than taxis.

If you’re going to be here a while it’s worth it, IMO. :sunglasses:

Got the beast back from the repair shop. A definite improvement in performance! Also took a gander at the problem. It was the pistion cylinder, and it was seized, I also saw a screw that had something to do with the problem, but I couldn’t figure out what. Anyways without that problem I’m sure there’s not too much else to go wrong with that thing. Anyways, I figure $3800 over another year is nothing. As long as the rest of it doesn’t fall apart.

Ha! That’s funny! :smiley:
Good advice. Like “Buy a new car every two years,” or “Buy all new furnature every two years.”
Better yet, STEAL ONE EVERY TWO YEARS! :smiling_imp:

Really? They told me that either 92 or 95 is fine, they’re not much different. How do you know what your caburettor’s set to?

Brian

Really? They told me that either 92 or 95 is fine, they’re not much different. How do you know what your caburettor’s set to?

Brian[/quote]

Most likely it’ll be factory set. Two strokes tend to use 92, four strokes tend to use 95. Scooters are pretty tolerant of slight variations in octane ratings, it only becomes a real pain if you’ve got more than one cylinder or fuel injection, or a tuned carburettor. The “standard” is 95RON unleaded for a four stroke engine.

If the guys in your bike shop know what they’re doing they will have a workshop manual stating the correct settings for your carbs and the applicable fuel grade. Some of the more fancy scooters do have fuel injection I believe. To be honest, I would go by what your mechanic says. I’ve never had any problems with scooters, they seem to be almost indestructable unless you park them under a taxi.

Our scooter battery has no charge and needs to be kick started these days. It’s a 2-year old Yamaha 125cc with 18K on the clock (real). We just took it to the scooter shop and asked for a recharge. However, the guy said it must be replaced (without checking it). Shouldn’t he recharge it before being able to decide if it is dead? Perhaps he’s right: I ride it three times a week to work - a 25 minute ride each way which should be enough to charge it, I guess. I recall that car batteries are designed to last for 10 years. Anyone know how long a scooter battery should last.

Well I’d like some advice before taking it to another engineer.

Thanks.

Yamaha OEM batteries have a 1 yr guarantee. Cheapies, six months. The last car battery I bought was over NT$6,000 (in the UK) and a bike battery is about NT$900 for my bike. So I’m not expecting it to last much over a year. If you’re alternator’s working and the battery’s not charging the battery’s done.

Well,
I’ve now been using 92 octane fuel for a few days. My scooter seems to have trouble starting. Before it started right away, now I’ve got to keep on the starter for a while and give it lots of gas before it gets into a normal idle. The mechanic reiterated using 92 so I guess I’ve got to stick to that. He also mentioned buying engine cleaning additive every 5000 km. Seems like a good idea.

Or you could buy a Matiz, it’s like a scooter, only with 4 doors and a roof. :wink:

[quote=“mfaass”]Well,
I’ve now been using 92 octane fuel for a few days. My scooter seems to have trouble starting. Before it started right away, now I’ve got to keep on the starter for a while and give it lots of gas before it gets into a normal idle. The mechanic reiterated using 92 so I guess I’ve got to stick to that. He also mentioned buying engine cleaning additive every 5000 km. Seems like a good idea.[/quote]

What scooter is it ?

Don’t forget to top off your blinker fluid every time you change your oil. Everyone’s blinkers seem to be broken here - all I can figure is country-wide poor blinker maintenance. :?

When you are in the left hand lane preparing to turn left into a side road, assume the taxi up ahead is about to do a U-turn. Failure to do so will result in your having to buy a new footbrake lever as the original will be bent into sh*te as a result of the inevitable collision. Or, em, so I’m told.

Foot brake?