Scooter Commuter

How offended are you by being labelled a scooter commuter?

  • Terribly offended! I demand action now!
  • Really offended. This is an outrage.
  • Just plain offended. Just for the heck of it.
  • Not offended at all. I’m an evil selfish jerk scooter commuter perpetrating the evil and I’ll do it again tomorrow.

0 voters

:rant: I really like Forumosa’s quirky little post-dependent titles. It adds color and spice to the forum. I adopted a similar program on my own forum.

But I strenuously object to the “Scooter :hand: :moped: :hand: Commuter” title being applied to me.:no-no: I am a conscientous objector to the madness of scooter driving in Taiwan. Scooters are a force of evil, increasing chaos :taz: and turning those who ride them into self-centered demons.:grrr: Not to mention the problem with polution and the lack of walkable sidewalks this creates.:tic:

Seriously, I’ve witnessed close to 20 accidents in 1 1/2 years here, and countless instances of mind-numbing stupidity :homer: and selfishness perpetrated by scooter drivers :happybiker: here. I reject this title and I will post 10 posts a day until I am rid of :braveheart: this offensive moniker which has been applied to my account name.

What’s the alternative? Have them all drive cars? Give them bicycles? Let them walk? Improve Public Transportation?

While I agree scooters are a huge problem, I’m not sure if there is a viable alternative. Most Taiwanese who drive ANY vehicle are self-centered demons. This goes for bus drivers all the way down to a 10 year old on a bike. Even pedestrians can be pretty oblivious to those around them most of the time.

I do think it’s getting better, if only incrementally. The police are on the lookout for unregistered scooters much more than they used to be. The accidents I see today are not as bad as the ones I saw 8 years ago, mainly I suppose because people wear helmets more than they did then. Public transport in improving, at least in my city, where city hall has set up several small shuttle bus lines in the inner city.Pollution remains a big problem, however, and the requirements for taking the emission control test should be much more stringent. As for the sidewalks, and lack of scooter parking places, I think that has more to do with poor urban planning than anything else.

I think a partial solution lies in making driver licensing, scooter registering and tough emmission control mandatory, with strong enforcement (ie steep cash fines) for all transgressions. That’s a big dream, I know, but it would be in the local governments interest. Just think of the cash they could rake in for the first few years! Taiwanese folks respond to money above all things, that’s why most people were a helmet these days. A large fine is much more of an incentive to them than any public awareness campaign.
:slight_smile:

Just say “NO!” to scooters!

Actually, I think the idea of improving public transportation and doing some serious cracking down on the law enforcement end would go a long way to helping things. The whole city planning problem would take both wise choices in the government and a lot of time.

Until things get better, though, we can always rant.

I like 'scooters. Mine is an efficient, clean and practical vehicle for urban, and sometimes suburban, transport.

Its the a**holes with no regard for safety and traffic laws that cause the problems. And this group includes a number of observed “foreigners.”

Address your concerns to the source of the problem.
Much more logical.

Their are many places that just wouldn’t be accessible without a bike or scooter outside of Taipei. Even in Taipei, there are places that just aren’t close to the MRT, like where I live. Yeah I could wait 10 mins for a bus, than sit on the bus for another 15 mins, than sit another 10 min on the MRT, then walk another 10 mins to the office. No thanks! I rather just hope on my scooter and get directly to work in under 15 mins total.

[quote]Address your concerns to the source of the problem.
Much more logical.[/quote] :bravo:

My sentiments as well. It’s unfair to label all scooter riders as evil. Not all of us ride dangerously or with disregard to the traffic laws. I say to each his own. If you don’t feel comfortable riding a scooter than don’t, just don’t dam everyone else who does ride one.

Don’t take my rant personally. I know there are lots of drivers out there who are careful and considerate.

This isn’t serious.

This thread is sort of like my refusal to accept pink color straws from certain drink shops where I know the boss well because “pink straws are for girls”. It’s all just for fun.

There is a problem with traffic in Taiwan, but I don’t really believe getting rid of all scooters is the best answer. Proper law enforcement, improved public transportation with incentives to use it, and long term improvements to city streets to accomodate the need for parking space are what I believe would be the best bet to actually change things.

But I’m not seriously trying to advocate that here. I’m just complaining at the ‘injustice’ of being labelled a scooter commuter because of my post count when I frequently poke fun of the situation here. I’d make a similar post if there was a “drinks juice with a pink straw” title.

Not offended. I’m too big for a scooter so I ride a bike.

A gutless bike, but a bike.

Use the scooter only when you need it, ex: going to the mountains or someplace really far,or hauling crap around. Other times just use MRT or bicycle.

Bicycles are so convenient here. I can bike clear across Taipei in only 20% more time than on a scooter. Just make sure you dont lock up a half-decent bike at the MRT station overnight or it will be stolen for sure.

No offence taken Puiwaihin. :smiley:

I’d say build a subway or something… I mean there is enough public transportation in Taiwan that you dont really need a vehicle of any kind unless you drive for a living (like pizza delivery or something). In Taipei you dont want to have a vehicle because parking space is like next to impossible to find and people will kill for a convienent parking space. Plus theres the cost of the vehicle, and licensing cost and fuel cost. Some think it costs more to ride the subway to work but I think it actually costs less because you dont have any hidden cost and its alot safer than driving scooters. I hate to say this but I really liked it when they had that big explosion some months ago at a scooter parking lot at banchao. Lots of scooters destroyed (fortunatly no one hurt) :smiling_imp:

My problem isn’t that they drive so many scooters here - imagine the traffic situation if every scooter driver was instead driving a car.

My problem is how so many people drive, such as not waiting until the pedestrians pass them on the sidewalk before backing out of their parking space, or doing dangerous maneuvers that can seriously injure themselves or others.

[quote=“puiwaihin”]:rant: I really like Forumosa’s quirky little post-dependent titles. It adds color and spice to the forum. I adopted a similar program on my own forum.

But I strenuously object to the “Scooter :hand: :moped: :hand: Commuter” title being applied to me.:no-no: I am a conscientous objector to the madness of scooter driving In Taiwan. Scooters are a force of evil, increasing chaos :taz: and turning those who ride them into self-centered demons.:grrr: Not to mention the problem with polution and the lack of walkable sidewalks this creates.:tic:

Seriously, I’ve witnessed close to 20 accidents in 1 1/2 years here, and countless instances of mind-numbing stupidity :homer: and selfishness perpetrated by scooter drivers :happybiker: here. I reject this title and I will post 10 posts a day until I am rid of :braveheart: this offensive moniker which has been applied to my account name.[/quote]

Nice post. Well written. Imaginative and funny.

I’m a scooter commuter too.

bump

Despite being adamantly against driving scooters, I don’t think that’s really true, especially if you want to travel after 10pm and want to be somewhere other than the locality in which you live.

If the MTR would have 24 hour service-- even if it meant slowing trains down to once every 45 minutes and increasing the price after standard hours, and to have a few night buses as they have in Hong Kong, it would work. But I think the bus company is afraid of how crazy the traffic gets once all the sane people go to sleep and people drive the streets as if they were living in a post-apocalyptic dead zone.

I have resolved the issue.