Scooter headlight bulb replacement question

I have 2 bulbs in my scooter headlight. The ‘low’ beam on each bulb has burned out. I still have the ‘high’ beams on each working.
I need to replace both bulbs - each one has a ‘low’ and a ‘high’ position/element/whatever.
A buddy, who has a scooter parts distributor business, tells me he can sell me, and install, either a same same replacement bulbs or ‘brighter and better’ bulbs. He recommends the ‘better’ one. The better bulbs look blueish. I do not know how to ask him or read on the package if these are High Intensity/Xenon bulbs.
The price difference is minimal. For both:
Same same - NT$100 - he does the replacement.
High Intensity - NT$200 - he does the replacement.
Like I said, he has a parts distribution business, its pretty good sized and been around for a while.

Which ones should I get? I drive very very little after dark, but I do run with my low beam lights on when I ride during the day.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Blue light produce more glare. Those frequencies scatter more, same reason the sky is blue. That why most countries use yellow lights and Taiwan prefers blue. Or do what everyone in Taiwan else does and use high beam all the time. Even more dangerous than blue lights hence better.

Ok, that was a “rant”, not “help”, sorry.

[quote=“Big Fluffy Matthew”]Blue light produce more glare. Those frequencies scatter more, same reason the sky is blue. That why most countries use yellow lights and Taiwan prefers blue. Or do what everyone in Taiwan else does and use high beam all the time. Even more dangerous than blue lights hence better.
Ok, that was a “rant”, not “help”, sorry.[/quote]I think we decided in another thread that those “scattered frequencies” will help me go faster and use less gasoline. Thanks.

Those blueish lights are annoying and quite dangerous for glare in wet conditions at night, for the OTHER drivers. They are probably safer for you, as long as the other drivers crash into something other than you.

I guess by that logic, the average TW rider would buy the blueish lights, so when in Rome…

ah… but TC I think what you’ll find is that your scoot’s engine runs purely to power the bulbs which in turn bend space time through the blue frequency scatter effect, creating a gravitational downhill and thus pulling your scooter forward… changing to a brighter, bluer bulb will therefore increase your performance, but cause your scooter to use 117 times more gas and you do run the risk of running over your own grandfather in a tricky space time anomaly…

it’s probably worth it though since in Taiwan you never really need lights for illumination purposes unless you live out in the mountains, so the biggest purpose of scooter lights is to get noticed, so the brighter the better, scatter be damned… NT$200 is fair enough, although you could source em yourself at a car/bike supply shop and save a few bucks…

To boost light power and scooter engine efficiency, a flux capacitor would greatly improve the overall performance…or take a trip to your local car accessory shop and pick up some Philips bulbs for cheap.

Cheers

Plasmo -
Thanks. Like I said, I rarely ride after dark. Just use them during my day trips around town to hopefully warn the locals not to run into me.
He’ll sell either of them to me for cheaper, but its still so cheap that I may as well let his mechanic do the work while I drink tea and chat with him & his wife.
I was just looking for some recommends about the standard or the blue.
Personally - either one is fine by me.

Oh…and I always carry a towel with me.

Hey TC,

I had tried both on my Yamaha scooter – I was happiest with non-stock (higher output ~23Watt or so each) white bulbs. If you should do any riding at all at night (even on occasion) you will think the extra light output with the higher output white bulbs is worth it. I found on my bike that they do in fact make a big difference. Don’t go for the blue ones – although others may see/notice you OK, it doesn’t light up the road very well, and becomes especially useless when it rains on lighting up wet roads.

I used an original bulb for about six months before it burned out and replaced it with a pricy 400 nt one, although not a blue type. My pricey one is still going after three years of being constantly lit when riding, amazing!
I like the look of the blue ones, but I am not sure if they are legal, my scooter mechanic told me that they weren’t anyways, and yes, they do give off too much glare. I would stick with a normal type, but get a good quality one that will last much longer, they are really worth the extra price.

Agree with getting a good high quality high output white bulb. Those blue ones are annoying.

i had the same question and problem as TC and my mechanic told me, that i should stick to the stock bulbs - even though the light output is quite poor at night - for electrical power/wire capacity/blah reasons. i trust him on most ways when it comes to bikes but i think i’ll try a brighter one despite and see what happens.
but not the blue one. thats just for fashion and is annoyingly bright (they say something in the line of 8000K plus). definately not necessary.
but can anyone confirm that the standard wirering of a bike can’t take the extra output?

[quote=“Stefan”]i had the same question and problem as TC and my mechanic told me, that i should stick to the stock bulbs - even though the light output is quite poor at night - for electrical power/wire capacity/blah reasons. i trust him on most ways when it comes to bikes but i think i’ll try a brighter one despite and see what happens.
but not the blue one. thats just for fashion and is annoyingly bright (they say something in the line of 8000K plus). definately not necessary.
but can anyone confirm that the standard wirering of a bike can’t take the extra output?[/quote]
I’m not rocket scientist but I believe the wattage of the bulbs is what you need to look at.

Some lamps use different inert gases and filaments to give superior results for the same wattage. IF the watts are similar, then I would just go with that.

the blue bulbs suck for most things except saying to others that you are a bit of a wanker. they are quite good at that.

stick with the stock or very similar bulb if you can, partly for the power compatibility, but mostly for the fact that the filaments are in the right place in relation to the reflector of your headlight, and thus the beam is projected into the correct places, including (or especially) the operation of the low beam cut off mask, so you don’t dazzle oncoming traffic. those aftermarket blue lights are illegal in many other countries (and here) for a good reason.

of course, if you want to be noticed, run a blue lamp on high beam all day. :laughing:

the 8000K colour temperature thing is an ‘equivalent temp rating’, not the actual temp rating of the globe. ie, if i held a perfect black body radiator at 8000K, the spectral output would be heavily biased into the blue end of the spectrunm. as the lamp is made of a tungsten filament, and tungsten melts at much lower than that (3695K), it should be selfevident. even quartz glass melts at much less than 1000K. sunlight, the gold standard of human-ideal light output, is about 3200-5000K, depending on the time of day! cooler near sunup, sunset. the actual surface temp of the sun is about 5770K.,

the power thingie is not so much of a factor. i have problems running my headlamp on my old ducati all the time, i would like to run it in the day for visibility, but the charging circuitry is not the best on those early 1980s bikes (Lucas: prince of darkness).

not much of an issue here on scooters, probably, as is the issue of thin (ergo cheaper) wiring not being able to cope with the extra current needed to run them. you might have a risk of a stall at low revs if the lamp sucks too much current, but not of a current induced melt down. the starter button is more likely to melt before the headlamp does if it was an issue (assuming it does not run through a solenoid). there are probably more major causes of poor bike electrics than the lamp load, like dirty connectors, wet cables, dying insulation, oxidised copper conductors, using the starter button 20 times in 1 mile, that kind of thing.

Thanks y’all for the info and comments.
I bought a couple of Phillips white bulbs.
These should do fine for my needs.

Always have your towel.

Is it a throwing towel? :smiling_imp:

and some peanuts.

and be careful of white mice

and some peanuts.

and be careful of white mice[/quote]