Skiing in Japan/Korea

I’ve been going back to the states during Chinese new year’s break to go skiing for many years, but the long flight and jetlag just don’t seem to be worth it anymore, so I’m wondering about skiing in Japan or Korea. The snow quality and mountains aside, my biggest deterrent is the language barrier. How English-friendly are Japanese/Korean ski resorts? For instance, will they understand how I want my bindings set? What are some good resorts in those countries? Four hours’ flight sure beats 14.

I have no idea, but would be very interested in the answers as well. How about a Forumosa ski outing?

You could also ski New Zealand, not sure how great skiing is there but at least you wouldn’t have the language barrier.

Skiing in NZ is generally pretty highly rated, but over Chinese New Year, I think that you wouldn’t get much snow (southern hemisphere).

This from a guy who is surrounded by world class skiing…Grand Targhee, Sun Valley, Jackson hole etc…

You just want to rub it in don’t you? :wink:

Never skiied in either Japan or Korea, but thinking coastal mountain ranges+low elevation=some pretty nasty snow…With maybe Hokkaido being an exception.

Hah, that’s nothing… I lived in Colorado for 2 years and didn’t go skiing once! :blush: :loco: Honestly though, I don’t ski as much as I used to, although I plan to hit the slopes this winter as much as I can.

Any progress on the skiing in Korea yet? Can we get back to the subject. Does anybody know?

I skied in Korea about 15 years ago. Not very expensive, very good snow (when I was there) but no use for much more than beginners/low intermediate. It’s probably much better now, though.
Hokkaido can be superb, but swingeingly expensive. I don’t recall much of a language barrier. Anyway, you can just adjust your bindings with a screwdriver – just screw 'em in as tight as they’ll go :wink:

I was in Korea last year to “attend” with 300 co-workers a ski weekend.

To be honest, though it will be at least 50% cheaper than Japan, find my learning

Oh, you ruined my dream :astonished: I guess, we’ll skip that then as we’re not going to go to Korea too long and I would have just wanted to take up skiing again for 1 or 2 days.
Being used to skiing in the good old Alps with good equipment, I doubt I will like it in Korea then.

Thanks for your feedback! :bravo:

[quote=“mesheel”]Oh, you ruined my dream :astonished: I guess, we’ll skip that then as we’re not going to go to Korea too long and I would have just wanted to take up skiing again for 1 or 2 days.
Being used to skiing in the good old Alps with good equipment, I doubt I will like it in Korea then.

Thanks for your feedback! :bravo:[/quote]

Compare it with Veysonnaz (as you are Swiss), 25 years ago, but not linked with the other slopes as they are now…

Better keep the money to head for Japan.
Damn’ me too I am missing the Alps… Imagine that I even could choose between Geneva and Taipei for our relocation … :loco: indeed

I was thinking about going to Japan to ski for the same reason of time and distance that you just mentioned. But, if you factor in price, Japan is just too expensive. You still have to factor in 2 whole days of travel because after the flight, you need to take a bus for 2 or 3 hours. So getting there and back will minus 2 days from your trip. The hotels and living cost in Japan is ridiculous!
For less money, I would rather go to Whistler…which I am. :slight_smile:
Can’t wait until Chinese New Year.

OK, if Japan’s too expensive and Korea is bad, what about Alaska? There are direct flights from Taipei to Anchorage every day. I know nothing in Alaska can compare to Whistler, and I envy you for going, but there should be no lines in Alaska with pristine condition, and a shorter flight than Taipei-Vancouver.

[quote=“sandman”]I skied in Korea about 15 years ago. Not very expensive, very good snow (when I was there) but no use for much more than beginners/low intermediate. It’s probably much better now, though.
Hokkaido can be superb, but swingeingly expensive. I don’t recall much of a language barrier. Anyway, you can just adjust your bindings with a screwdriver – just screw 'em in as tight as they’ll go :wink:[/quote]

Kiroro ski resort in Hokkaido was wonderful with powder snow. I’m not sure if it’s expensive as I haven’t skied in other countries. Pls take a look at the below price list. Besides skiing, I’m sure you can enjoy food overthere if you like Japanese food.

japanspecialists.com/files/kiroro_acc.html

Have fun!!

Ahh, I miss my Piz Buin. Used to ski at least once a year when I was younger. Now, haven’t skiied for at least 8 years :unamused:

Saw a documentary recently and Korean slopes are not very inviting if you think of all the drunkards on them.

Don’t drink and ski!! Dangerous indeed! :astonished: :astonished:

58 days left until Whistler. :laughing:

Just got back from a ski trip to Niseko in Hokkaido, and it was fabulous. My initial apprehension about the language barrier turned out to be not much of a problem. Half the skiers in Niseko are Australians who go there for the deep powder. The best part for us was the short flight. The Aussies fly for over 10 hours to get there, and it’s only 3 hours from Taipei to Sapporo (and then a 2.5 hour bus ride to get to the ski town of Hirafu). The airfare is cheaper now after the CNY high season (NT$16000 round trip). And then there’s the mountain. The huge 3-resort “powder paradise of Japan” offers a wide variety of runs with short to no lines getting on the lifts. As of Tuesday, it still had knee-deep powder at the summit, and it was snowing heavily the day we were leaving. Unlike most ski areas in the US, Niseko has a southern exposure facing the magnificent Mt. Youtei, so you’re basking in the sun all day. Another advantage is the onsen (hot springs), which does wonders for tired muscles after a vigorous day on the slopes. The season runs until April with reduced lift ticket rates starting on March 6. We’re already making plans for next year. :sunglasses:

Sounds like a wicked trip! :bravo: :bravo:

What did you pay for accomodation, lift tickets, rentals etc? I’d love to snowboard again, it’s been quite a few years.

There’re all kinds of accomodations in Hirafu. We stayed at a lodge in a room with a half bath (sink and toilet). Four nights for two came to 45200 yen. You can go for the higher end accomodation in a hotel, which will set you back 15000 yen/person/night.
The 3-day, all-mountain lift ticket, which gives you access to all 3 resorts, was 12,800 yen. But the rates go down after March 6 as I mentioned earlier.
Ski set rental (carving skis) for 3 days: 10,000 yen.

If you don’t want the hassle of making all the arrangements through back and forth emails with people with bad English, either of these companies will take good care of you:
www.skijapan.com But you’ll pay a hefty price for the English-friendly service.

As for food, 4500 yen will get you a decent Japanese dinner for two. An all you can eat dinner buffet costs 4000 yen a person.

Incubus: Want pics!

Whistler was very nice over the Chinese New Year. Fresh powder almost every day. 7th heaven really was like heaven on the 2 days that we got sun. I can’t believe it took us nearly 50 minutes to get up to the summit and 1 hour to get down the mountain.
Legs were so sore after 8 days of straight skiing. Definately out of shape.

Food was good everywhere except on the mountain. Not cheap though.

Shopping was good too. Helly Hansen stores, ski shops, everything u need for skiing.

The only minus was the flight took soooo long, then there was a 2 hour bus ride after your 12 hour flight. ug.

Next year, I definately will try Japan. Can I tag along Incubus?