So, I'm not a white teacher!

:smiley:

Not as much as I’d like. I spend most of my time with my gf.

I don’t think the EEOC would ever have been created without organizations like the NAACP.

So I guess your point is that the financial bottom line is interfering with the cultural presentation of the US and perpetuating stereotypes of mainstream US being white, right?

Good point, but most buxiban aren’t really in the business of educating the whole child-- they are trying to make parents think their kids are learning English. Quite often giving the appearance that parents expect is more important than providing quality education. Sadly, the whole industry needs a paradigm shift.

Enjoy your weekend :slight_smile:

Basically, they are saying that you are not as important to the school as the other FTs in the school. You’re good enough to run their classrooms, but not good enough to be in front of the company. Kind of like the house slave, huh?

I would say something to them along the lines of, “I am getting the impression that you are ashamed of me and don’t want the parents to know that I work here by not including me in any publicity or events where parents attend. Is this a correct assumption or is there another reason for this?”

If you feel you are being disrespected, start looking for a school that will treat you like a teacher and not a house slave.

[quote]

If you feel you are being disrespected, start looking for a school that will treat you like a teacher and not a house slave.[/quote][/quote]

yup

All I care about when parents are about is that the FT are talking to the kids and parents in English.

That is the way to change their minds.

The school I teach in has hired black as in coal black miners from Kentucky teachers, black as in coffee with cream from Mississippi, ABC, CBC, a CBO Argentine who spoke perfect English, Spanish, Taiwanese and Mandarin. He got the job because of what he had on the stick. Not because of his slanted eyes and yellow skin. So to all the whiners, and they do who up here from time to time, Yes, race can be a problem here in Taiwan, espcially if you are not Han Chinese.

I am sure that if a black ESL teacher from America or Canada were to go to Somalia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, or Ivory Coast he just might find more than a little bit of antagonism.

So, there are plenty of jobs in Taiwan, and quite frankly it becomes boring to read all these post every two months or so about people who whine about how purple, mauve, chartreuse, indigo, sienna, cotton white, or Michelin black folks just can’t find a job.

Quit whining and do your homework. Many have done it and so can you.

Just out of curiousity, why do you want the FTs speaking to the parents in English? If I did that with most of my parents, I’d be greeted with polite smiles, vigorous nodding, but complete bewilderment. :stuck_out_tongue:

Well I’m definitely not white and I have no problems at all. To teach in the local elementary school I first went overseas and did a Bachelor of Education with minors in Linguistics and TEFL.

I have no problems with Chinese parents complaining I’m not white enough to teach. Last year the Chiayi County Education department ordered 85 Elementary and junior high schools to take part in an English Artistry Contest.

Much to some schools angst :blush: :blush: ( they paid a lot for foriegn teachers :astonished: ) the children I taught won the competition. Made a stir in the local newspapers that a bunch of aboriginal kids from way up in the mountains outdid their supossedly better taught city kids. :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Many of our kids have 100% scores in these stupid GEPT tests that the Chinese so like. Good teaching doesnt come from the colour of your skin. We also have a good black south african friend who has no problems with teaching as well.

Just out of curiousity, why do you want the FTs speaking to the parents in English? If I did that with most of my parents, I’d be greeted with polite smiles, vigorous nodding, but complete bewilderment. :p[/quote]

There are a good dozen or two of my kid’s parents who speak English quite well. When I talk to them and other Chinese teachers, in English, the other parents always go to them afterwards and ask, “What was that all about?” Normally, I’m talking about school, and reading, and how best to edumacate their kids, so the one I was speaking with then relates it back to the one who can’t speak English.

It’s a Tom Sawyer painting the fence technique to get the word out that I know what I’m doing here. :slight_smile: And it’s a good face building technique for the parents to speak in English about their kids…not just simple “How are you today?”

[quote=“Ramblin Rube”]The school I teach in has hired black as in coal black miners from Kentucky teachers, black as in coffee with cream from Mississippi, ABC, CBC, a CBO Argentine who spoke perfect English, Spanish, Taiwanese and Mandarin. He got the job because of what he had on the stick. Not because of his slanted eyes and yellow skin. So to all the whiners, and they do who up here from time to time, Yes, race can be a problem here in Taiwan, espcially if you are not Han Chinese.

I am sure that if a black ESL teacher from America or Canada were to go to Somalia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, or Ivory Coast he just might find more than a little bit of antagonism.

So, there are plenty of jobs in Taiwan, and quite frankly it becomes boring to read all these post every two months or so about people who whine about how purple, mauve, chartreuse, indigo, sienna, cotton white, or Michelin black folks just can’t find a job.

Quit whining and do your homework. Many have done it and so can you.[/quote]

I’m one of those people who complained back in the day. I spent nearly 6 months looking for a job in Taiwan, despite coming to the table with a degree in linguistics specializing in TESOL, a year of prior ESL teaching experience, and a year of Mandarin under my belt. Generally, my applications would go like this: I’d reply to a job online with a professional resume outlining all the things I had done, including all the experiences I had working with children through volunteer programs, and a nice cover letter. Then I’d get a response that I was exactly what they were looking for and could I please send in my photo. So I’d send in my photo and I’d either hear “Oops, sorry, the position is taken.” (and see the same position appearing in new ads) or nothing. Only once was someone honest enough to say something along the lines of, “Our parents prefer white people.”

Many others do do it, you’re right. But there are still too many who can’t and have to go home empty handed after spending their time here getting doors slammed in their faces.