Some practical advice from a Japanese

#21

He’s a gerbil and he is about the size of a plastic bathtub.

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#22

What a twist!

#23

I am imagining a capybara now.

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#24

I gotta say i found the show to be pretty boring after all the hype. But i was curious to try out the folding and damn, the first cupboard i tried it on looks amazing now. I free’d up a lot space. Acxording to my gf they already know this space saving folding style here, but i only think thats half true because i have seen some mega hoarders in taiwan. Some peoples homes look like an actual skip

#25

5 kilos. So bathtub is the one they use for babies.

#26

A couple of years ago a Korean book was all the craze. Very good tips including what they call here «zona», which is vital in small spaces. Little gadgets or stuff you can use to organize space better.

#27

Oh, somehow I thought Bobby was your husband…

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#28

Well he farts, he snores in his sleep, likes his food a certain way and that way only. He is training me for future possible husband.

4 Likes
#29

Konmari method? Could be a cult. She must be popular. Talk shows rarely have guests that need translators. I’m going to watch it today.

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#30

It’s a bit of a cult already. Some new agey stuff about praying to the house …

#31

My wife tried to konmari me during her new year cleaning. Luckily I weigh 470 lbs.

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#32

Lets hope you were considered under the “sentimental items” step.

Konmari says that the following is the way to tidy:

  1. Clothes
  2. Books
  3. Papers
  4. Komono (miscellaneous)
  5. Sentimental items
#33

Better not to let the house get too full of itself. Who does it think it is?

#34

That new agey stuff has been used in Japan for a couple thousand years. Works for them. Can be useful.

I really like the concept of kami. It is related I think to what we call in linguistics the idea of a word.

In our culture, we also have this idea that your mood affects the living and non living things around you, that your possessions are somehow imprinted with your vital energy, to say it simply. So, if you are a Hagar the Horrible, complaining all the time, stuff will not grow in your vicinity, and your negative energy will make everything fail around you.

See how it is that when you are depressed you are messy and untidy. Inner peace, outer calm. In Spanish we say: donde hay orden, esta Dios, y donde esta Dios no falta nada. God dwells in a neat place.

I did not have as many clothes and shoes before so I am very grateful for each piece of garment I have now. All the stuff I have bought here in Taiwan to make my life more confortable, I am grateful for that. It seems gratefulness helps your health and extends your life. At least makes it more pleasant.

#35

Does she say what to do with all the clothes you are too fat to wear now but will look great in once you are you somehow become thinner again at some indeterminate time in the future ?

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#36

I’m guessing that looking at those clothes would not bring most people joy, so in the bin they go.

I’m at a really unusual stage of having trousers and shorts that are actually too big for me now, but I’m pretty sure that throwing them away would guarantee I’d gain the weight back.

#37

Watched an episode yesterday, pretty funny watching typical American people come to grips with a completely Japanese person, maybe I’ll watch another one. Mostly, because of that damn article, I can’t quite get the image of Marie Kondo telling me to do things out of my head :slight_smile:

#38

I couldn’t get through one episode. It seemed more time spent about the people and having a religious experience with organizing than with the actual act.