Spit roasting

Has anyone any experience in spit-roasting (of pigs/lambs before someone starts)?

How difficult is it? I’ve been looking at this article and looks not too bad http://www.3men.com/spitroasting.htm

Mugatu -
I’ve done it quite a number of times. Whole pigs, beef quarters and legs of lamb.

It takes time and attention; but its not hard to do. Like most cooking, preparation is important.

Figure about 6 - 8 hours of time on the spit for most items - there is a desired internal temp to be reached. Make sure you have enough wood/charcoal/briquet’s to keep a hot bed of coal going. If using gas, heaven forbid, adequate supply. Get the bed of coals prepared and going before you put the meat on the spit.
If you’re using an electric rotisserie check it out and have a hand crank one available in case the electric one goes bad. If using a hand crank…have lots of dependable volunteers to turn the crank. Watch their beer consumption as the day goes on.

Have enough sauce to last the day and for putting on the meat when its pulled off after its done.
I liked to put garlic cloves into legs of lamb and then coat them with plain yogurt for 8-10 hours before putting them on the spit. The yogurt acts as a tenderizer and the garlic goes nicely with the lamb. You should keep them in a cooler during this time. And Be ready to re-coat as the yogurt has a tendency to drip off the lamb.

Good Roastin’!

And if you’re doing more than one different animal at a time, realise that rare roast beef and pork require different cooking times. Don’t make the same mistake that a chef I used to know did.

In interests of full disclosure, I’m a seafood vegetarian (I know there’s a name for it, but I can’t remember it), but everyone who ate the spits that aforementioned chef cooked, complained. I was the bartender, so they complained to me for some reason.

CFI -
That is probably the main reason its necessary to go with internal temperatures of the meat. Get a good thermometer that is long enough. If all is done right, people who want it rare and folks who want it well done will all be happy!
Going by cooking time and “looks” alone leads to problems.
Also proper fire management. Thinner parts of the roast will cook quicker and the coals have to be moved to prevent burning these parts.

“Acquatarian”…?

[quote=“TainanCowboy”]CFI -
That is probably the main reason its necessary to go with internal temperatures of the meat. Get a good thermometer that is long enough. If all is done right, people who want it rare and folks who want it well done will all be happy!
Going by cooking time and “looks” alone leads to problems.
Also proper fire management. Thinner parts of the roast will cook quicker and the coals have to be moved to prevent burning these parts.

“Acquatarian”…?[/quote]

Acquatarian sounds good to me. Strangely, I worked in a cafe/bar/restaurant for a couple of months after one of my long travel stints. And apparently, I cook a great steak. Better than the boss, who spent 15 years as a cook in the German army before moving to Australia and opening a successful restaurant.

alright, i will give it a go then. might end up a right mess but it’ll be fun trying

CFI -
Thats a mighty fine recommendation!

[quote=“TainanCowboy”]CFI -
Thats a mighty fine recommendation![/quote]

Actually TC, I think you’d love the place. Chicken-fried steak, jambalaya, corn fritters, paprika fries (best fries I’ve ever had), pecan pie, great coffee, Californian and Australian reds, full bar, all backed with a blues band and decorated with classic motorbikes - including what was supposedly the original bike from Easy Rider.