Status for our daughter after she is born

My wife (a Taiwanese) and I (an American) are expecting our first child (a girl) in early December. What I don’t know is the following:

How should I register her with U.S. authorities to make sure she gets her American citizenship? Would we use the Chinese name we will give her or the Western name (they have been chosen already, but we don’t know the rules in this regard.)

Will she have Taiwanese citizenship and if so, what are the pros and cons of obtaining it? Since she is a girl, she won’t have to face military service.

Is there anything else I should know?

Thanks in advance.

I’m no expert on this, but I think I saw quite a few posts regarding this topic on this very forum.

I guess it would depend on where she is born. I believe she would automatically be a US citizen if you are one regardless of where she’s born, although you might want to double-check if both parents need to be US citizens. I think only one is needed.

[quote=“ludahai”]My wife (a Taiwanese) and I (an American) are expecting our first child (a girl) in early December. What I don’t know is the following:

How should I register her with U.S. authorities to make sure she gets her American citizenship? Would we use the Chinese name we will give her or the Western name (they have been chosen already, but we don’t know the rules in this regard.)

Will she have Taiwanese citizenship and if so, what are the pros and cons of obtaining it? Since she is a girl, she won’t have to face military service.

Is there anything else I should know?

Thanks in advance.[/quote]

Yo New Hampshire… Check out this site

bcis.gov/graphics/index.htm

Specifically
bcis.gov/graphics/publicaffa … chowto.htm

[quote]The Child Citizenship Act (CCA) which becomes effective on February 27, 2001, amends the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) to provide U.S. citizenship to certain foreign-born children

Go to 2nd floor of AIT to American Citizen Services. You will have to take your daughter and birth certificate (Chinese and English) as well as your marriage certificate. I think you also have to apply for her US passport at the same time (I did this a long time ago and I’ll be doing it again next month). I can’t remember the cost but total will be under US $200. Oh yeah, you’ll also need photos of your daughter and you’ll probably need a copy of your own birth certificate along with your US passport.

BTW, your daughter’s birth certificate is called a “Consular Report of Birth”.

ait.org.tw/ait/TSS/ACS/CRBA_Info.html

Moderator’s Note: These procedures should be completed promptly. You will also want to file for the child’s social security number.

You should have the Taiwanese parent take the birth certificate to the local Household Registration Office to register the child’s birth within a few days after the child is born.

You should complete the registration procedures with the USA authorities in Taiwan (American Institute in Taiwan) as well.

It makes no difference which procedures are completed first, so in fact you should undertake them both at the same time.

Is there some sort of time limit for getting a report of birth abroad for my son? He’s registered in our household registration, but I haven’t gotten him his U.S. passport. It’s been six months. I was told that time didn’t matter. we’re just bussy and if there’s no rush. . . .

But I guess I should have really gotten a clear answer before now! :blush:

Moderator’s note: The reporting “of a birth of an American citizen abroad” to the AIT should be done promptly.

[quote=“housecat”]Is there some sort of time limit for getting a report of birth abroad for my son? He’s registered in our household registration, but I haven’t gotten him his U.S. passport. It’s been six months. I was told that time didn’t matter. we’re just bussy and if there’s no rush. . . .

But I guess I should have really gotten a clear answer before now! :blush:[/quote]

It has to be done before he’s 18 years old.

travel.state.gov/childcit.html#8

travel.state.gov/acquisition.html

OK, so the first part of the answer is easy, so long as one parent is a US citizen the child automatically acquires US citizenship at birth. If the other parent is Taiwanese the child is also automatically a Taiwan citizen at birth. Becasue the child is a Taiwan citizen, he/she must comply with Taiwan laws, such as being registered with the household registry.

ait.org.tw/en/uscitizens/CRBA_Info.asp

Additionally, according to the above, as a Taiwan citizen the first time the child departs from Taiwan it has to do so using a Taiwan passport. Apparently the child can then return using either its Taiwan or US passport. If the child returns on a US passport the child can then travel on that passport in the future, but will need to apply for a Taiwan resident visa and ARC.

I wonder if (a) the above sounds correct and (b) despite the hassle of having to apply for resident visa and ARC, it’s probably better for the kid to return on the US passport to make future travels easier, right?

I have an offshoot question. If the child is registered with the household registry, he/she must have the Chinese surname of the father (except in the case of an unknown father, or if the wife has no brothers). Does this mean that the child must then use that name on a foreign passport? Can a child be Jonathan Doe on his foreign passport and Huang Feihong on his ROC passport? Does it matter which name gets registered first?

Maoman wrote [quote]I have an offshoot question. If the child is registered with the household registry, he/she must have the Chinese surname of the father (except in the case of an unknown father, or if the wife has no brothers). Does this mean that the child must then use that name on a foreign passport? Can a child be Jonathan Doe on his foreign passport and Huang Feihong on his ROC passport? Does it matter which name gets registered first?
[/quote]

My daughter has her name registered on the household registration as well as her Taiwanese passport using her Chinese names. Her Australian passport was obtained at the Australian Defacto Embassy before we had had her registered at the Taiwan household registration. Her Australian passport therefore reads her full English names, different to her Taiwanese passport.

what about if a child is born from both parents foeigners what will be the nationality of the child??

and after how many years you can calim to have taiwanese nationality instead of your own one ?

in nederlands after 5 years if you speak the language you can claim the nederlands nationality and after that the child can have both nationality?

laeti

There is no claim to “Taiwan nationality” just due to the fact that the child was born in Taiwan. After all, the parents are fully known and have valid passports from other countries.

If the child later learns to speak the local language fluently, and is comfortable living in Taiwan, then the Taiwanese authorities will not take these factors into consideration . . . . and there will be no special claim that the child has rights to naturalization . . . . .

The standard requirements for naturalization in Taiwan also appear to require that the applicant be of adult age . . . . . .

If the child is a male. You best come in on your non-ROC passport if you plan to stay more than 4 months. Unless you want to spend 20 months as a Ah-bing ge in the ROC military.

I know of a couple of cases where a male Taiwan citizen that lived their entire life abroad, came into ROC on an ROC passport and got conscripted. Cops just picked him up and said you’ve just earned 2 years in the military.

I wish to go to the AIT this week to apply for (a) a consular report of birth (b) US passport and © social security card. I got all the papers from the AIT website, completed them and have supporting documents. But apparently the AIT does not answer their telephone or return calls, so I’m resorting to this higher source of info for an answer to my one question.

My question: is it best for both parents and the baby all go to the AIT together, or is it unnecessary? Or, worse, will they tell us we need to make an appointment to come back with the baby on some other day? Given the great hassle of bundling up the baby for visits to government offices, such information will be much appreciated.

Has anyone applied at the AIT for all above documents for their baby recently? Is it a good idea to bring the baby on the first visit or not?

Thanks.

I have just gone through the process.

On the first visit, you should go alone with all of your documents. You will then schedule a follow-up, when both parents and the baby are all expected to show up together. At this second “appointment”, if all of the documents are in order, the application for the Consular Report and the passport will go through. The later takes about five weeks as it needs to be sent Stateside (to the passport processing center in New Hampshire I believe). The former should take a little less. I will let you know when I get it.

If you have any other questions, feel free.

[quote=“Mother Theresa”]I wish to go to the AIT this week to apply for (a) a consular report of birth (b) US passport and © social security card. I got all the papers from the AIT website, completed them and have supporting documents. But apparently the AIT does not answer their telephone or return calls, so I’m resorting to this higher source of info for an answer to my one question.

My question: is it best for both parents and the baby all go to the AIT together, or is it unnecessary? Or, worse, will they tell us we need to make an appointment to come back with the baby on some other day? Given the great hassle of bundling up the baby for visits to government offices, such information will be much appreciated.

Has anyone applied at the AIT for all above documents for their baby recently? Is it a good idea to bring the baby on the first visit or not?

Thanks.[/quote]

In response to my prior question, about whether one should bring ones baby to the AIT when applying for consular report, passport, SS card, I’m sure you’re right, Ludahai, and one can do it as you said. Or one can bring the baby on the first visit, as we did, and then make a follow-up visit alone to bring any remaining documents. I know because I made my follow-up visit today with the last few items and received the Consular Report.

On the first visit I erroneously brought the baby’s passport photos which were too small and they were not satisfied with my proof that I have lived in the US for 5 years, so this time I had to bring my college transcripts.

But here’s what pissed me off about the experience. On the first visit they asked if I wanted Emily’s passport to state that she was born in Taiwan or China. WTF??? Why would I say China; I already told them she was born in Taipei.

Then today they asked me to check the accuracy of an application form they had typed up. For nationality of my wife it said “China,” so I told them there was a mistake, she’s not Chinese she’s Taiwanese. They conferred and came back and reported that they can’t say Taiwan there. “At least put Republic of China,” I told them, “it’s not correct.” Sorry, no can do they replied. :bluemad: When I have the time later I will write to the head of AIT to complain. This is not a matter of politics; it’s just wrong.

China does put enormous pressure on other countries to conform to the most ridiculous restrictions about taiwan. For example, the last time I went to the Philippines, the Taiwanese person traveling with me was forced to write ‘China’ in the Place of Birth field. On a lousy visa application!

OK, so the Philippines is a very weak country near China. But why should the US and its agencies submit to this kind of treatment? I think this is a gross infringement of our sovereignity. I can’t believe this is really AIT policy. Did you speak to the supervisor on duty?

“Our sovereignty?” Who is “our”? The USA?

Are you suggesting that the correct designation of this Taiwanese person’s birthplace should be listed as “Taiwan, USA”?

After all, the USA does not consider Taiwan an independent sovereign nation, and . . . . . an examination of the post WWII treaties shows clearly that the sovereignty of “Formosa and the Pescadores” was not given to the ROC . . . . . . . so there might be some good rationale to saying that the sovereignty of “Formosa and the Pescadores” is being held by the USA, in a similar situation to Iraq . . . . . .

I will have to do some additional research on this angle.

Just a quick word - The U.S. government gives the applicant the option of putting Taiwan or China on the passport. If you select Taiwan and the child wants to go to mainland China in the future, they could face difficulties getting in.

BTW, I always thought the letter “C” in ROC stood for China (as in the Republic of). Not Taiwan (as in the Republic of Taiwan) so yes, your wife is Chinese.

Crap… my sons Australian passport’s place of birth is listed as Taichung Taiwan…

He doesnt have any issues with travelling to China… they don’t care where your born, just your nationality and appropriate visa.