Strange customs

Found this story in the BBC today
news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5280312.stm

If you can’t be bothered to read it, it talks about having strippers at funerals in Jiangsu province to increase the number of spectators. The bigger the crowd the more honour for the deceased. just seems a little messed up as surely the strippers must detract from the honour. My thinking would be that needing a stripper to draw a crowd would prove that I was not liked.

Anyway I thought we coudl have a thread just on weird customs from around the world.

Don’t people attend Irish wakes for the party? :beer:

Hell, I’d prefer to know people were having a grand ol time at my funeral celebrating my life…even with a stripper if that tickled their fancy…sure beats dreary, sad, crying, depressing funerals. :smiley:

They used to be a common sight here, too – it was at a funeral that I saw my very first white tiger.
You don’t see them at all here now in Taipei. Maybe down south they still have them though.

Plenty of strippers at funerals here in Taiwan…

Last one I saw was on the street on a Sunday afternoon near the Yong He night market. The female MC cleared all the mobile phones and cameras before taking money for a feel up. Amazing how many of the mostly old folks, but kids too, went the donate and grope.

HG

[quote=“Edgar Allen”]Found this story in the BBC today
news.BBC.co.uk/2/hi/Asia-pacific/5280312.stm

If you can’t be bothered to read it, it talks about having strippers at funerals in Jiangsu province to increase the number of spectators. The bigger the crowd the more honour for the deceased. just seems a little messed up as surely the strippers must detract from the honour. My thinking would be that needing a stripper to draw a crowd would prove that I was not liked.

Anyway I thought we coudl have a thread just on weird customs from around the world.[/quote]

And the more money they get in white envelopes … it’s all about money …

Oh hang on a cultural gem, white envelopes? Bai Bao? Ihaven’t heard of this. I only attended 1 Chinese funeral (in the UK) but didn’t see or hear of white envelopes there. Lots of other interesting stuff though.

Wedding red envelops, funeral white envelops … also the figure needs to be correct … even for the one, odd for the other or something … don’t remember which one

Ah yes I heard about the odd number thing when they ran a collection at work for someone who’s husband has died. We had to put HK$101 in each I think, or was that 1001…whatever.

In South Africa Traditional funerals still sometimes use professional wailers. This can be quite a spectacle. Women who are paid to go to a funeral, scratch their faces with their nails until they bleed and wail and cry as loud and as long as they can. Deafening. Usually a bull (or if the family doesn’t have enough money) a sheep is slaughtered. The funeral is followed by a day or two of feasting and a great deal of drinking. Usually friends of the family will go around before the funeral collecting money to help the family pay for the funeral and the feast. I think this is a very considerate custom as funerals (and the feast) can quite often turn out to be rather expensive.

In traditional African wedding ceromonies, the bride-groom is expected to pay “Lebola”. This is a term used to indicate that the bride-groom has to pay money for the bride. In the old days Lebola was paid in cows, as the more cows a man had the richer he was considered. Having many children a man was (and to a certain extent still is) an indicator of a man’s wealth. Ergo, a man can support a large family so he must be wealthy, and having daughters would ensure you get some cows down the line. Today, Lebola is often paid in money, as the average South African won’t be able to keep 50 odd cows in the backyard. However, the Lebola sum is still worked out in amount of cows. i.e. Say the Lebola price is considered to be 10 cows, then the bride-groom should give the bride’s family the price in Rands (SA’s currency) of 10 cows.
Whites used to think that the bride was being bought, but this isn’t true. Actually, Lebola (the price varies wrt the brides status and other charms) is to show that the bride-groom can actually take care of the bride. Also, the Lebola usually goes toward paying for the wedding ceremony (which like a funeral is over several days and consists of much feasting and carousing) and the brides family usually sends her off to her husband with a dowry of linen and other household necessities.

[quote=“sandman”] it was at a funeral that I saw my very first white tiger.
[/quote]

Naturally bald type White Tiger?

Yeah, down south that stuff still goes on. I went to a wedding in Fungsan a few years ago and saw a banana show at a wedding.Right in front of all the women too :bravo: