Subtle signs of whats to come

#1

Though its been happening for decades and those that care here have seen the progression, this is one of many recent signs that shows taiwan is in for something new. The astonishing thing, globally, is how little people care. If they have cash in their wallet, there is no fight in them. Shocking.

This was intentionally posted in human rights as a subtle, thought provoking, kind of thing (a note for the site owners who move some things and make the entire conversation confusing and near impossible to follow the evolution of the conversation). Though its not legal so much as the parent category suggests.

Sitting in kaohsiung working and noticing. Been in the south a while and man do i feel its changing a lot. Some ways good, far more ways not so good.

#2

I’m seeing a lot more simplified characters in Taiwan for sure… more and more public advertisements are in simplified.

The CNC mill my neighbor is trying to sell me has simplified Chinese interface. If I do end up buying it (I do not have the money), I’m going to change it to English.

#3

I read your post about that mahcine and your work. We have done some work trying to find customers in niche markets for our forestry stuff. Its very interesting what youre doing.

perhaps your machine interface is a slightly different problem. The machine was made there so its logical to have their language. Maybe just need yo buy or hire a person to put on a new language package. Taiwan importers cant be rellied on much. The difference is public streets and government systems are starting to show symtoms of the cancer. And thats late stage style problems…

#4

Because the traditional character for “turn” (轉) and “area” (區) took many more strokes, the office said the simplified versions 転 and 区 were used. The contractor was notified of the error and made the correction last night, according to the office.

Office representatives said that the painting of the signs will be more tightly regulated in the future.

This is good.
I think Taiwan netizens will spotlight a lot of these issues. Maybe someone has already started a blog of such sightings.

#5

I’d let that go. Don’t think that’s even how you right 轉in simplified. It’s much uglier than that.

#6

Doesn’t this situation play into how he duped voters into believing “THE CHINESE ARE COMING TO BUY OUR MONEY PIT CONDOS!!!”. Why would there be simplified characters if Fishy tits was telling us lies?

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#7

I want my 2 minutes back

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#8

Only if you give me my 9 years back on Forumosa :slightly_frowning_face:

#9

Doesn’t simplified characters occasionally get used in Taiwan for things like this? I’ve seen it around substituting really high stroke words all the time. almost no one would write Taiwan in traditional characters for example.

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#10

They get used in handwriting all the time, but some forms are different from the mainland (like the form of 轉 they used). Weird in such a visible context though

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#11

It was actually Japanese Kanji character though

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#12

i think this is the biggest point. they always penetrate subtly throughout the world. but when its something like roads and government controlled public service sectors, it should be an eye opener…especially here. This example should be viewed as a test by them on us to see whats lacking in our government structure and also our cultural addiction to not giving a phuck.

#13

when simplified is used as a shorthand i don’t see the problem. nothing political and china ass kissing about it. as others have stated, their simplified is ugly, worse and i’ve not seen it used here.

in terms of not giving a puck, well, welcome to taiwan.

#14

perhaps try getting Americans to starting using favourite and colour. the issue is more real here as we have a far different written language due to blah blah blah. but it is a fact despite political, moral, cultural or whatever affiliation. using the official language of a hostile nation, which is in fact a different written form, on your public streets should be an issue. one china argument aside as its a farce to begin with in todays world, there seems no other way to interpret this. in fact this is one instance where a “drunk worker” might actually save face.

#15

It’s a pinko dog whistle, is what it is.

Or maybe it isn’t. I dunno.

#16

I’m moving this to TP because, as you concede, it’s not really a legal issue.

#17

But why would I use colour when I can write color. There are literally some characters with like 25 strokes. I don’t really see a huge problem if some of them get simplified here and there. I would have a problem if entire sentences and documentations, etc become simplied. It must suck painting 20 stroke words with a brush on the road. I don’t see the huge issue for one single character.

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#18

I brought this up with some local friends on both sides of the political isle here and they all have the same opinion…
This is a non-issue.
You really are thinking too much.

#19

Here’s the test: make a big fuss, and if they change the signage then no problem.

#20

I really disagree. It’s just an example of a workman being lazy and probably pressed for time or low on paint or something. People use those forms here all the time.

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