Supersad America

Few people know that it was the man of steel that ultimately led to the dismantlement of the Ku Klux Klan. But it wasn’t his super strength that did it nor his ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound, it was his X-ray vision. In particular, it was the work of Stetson Kennedy, who became Superman’s X-ray specs as he infiltrated the KKK and revealed to the Marvel Comic writers the secrets of the KKK. It wasn’t, however, the KKK’s dastardly acts that bought them undone. In fact, they were a surreptitious source of celebration across America. It was the humiliation of being revealed. The simple fact that children through out the South pantomimed Superman’s destruction of the KKK using revelations of secret handshakes and other elements of quaint behavior (as they appeared in comic books courtesy of Kennedy’s bravery) which brought the most tight knit debauchery of silliness to its knees. Parents arrived home to see their own children unknowingly ridicule them to the extent of Fred Flintstone being elected grand pooh-bah to the Royal order of the Water Buffalos that they simply abandoned the KKK.

These days , however, the US has lost that simple sense of the ridiculous. It has been drowned out by the rhetoric of certainty. It has become a place of posturing pomposity. To the extent that someone like Ed Snowden is the fool. He is the cock-and-balls on the toilet wall – uncomfortable to look at, weird to explain to children, yet an unavoidable truth. America has become a Supersad place, where X-ray vision has become a liability rather than a super power.

Have you actually ever been there?

No. My judgments are from afar, like most of the world.

And, thus, very suspect.

I don’t really understand what this rant is all about, but for me it lost its credibility with this sentence:

Dude, Superman is DC. Can you imagine Superman fighting next to Wolverine against Doctor Octopus? No, because it would never happen.

I remember plenty of Marvel and DC crossovers happening when I was a kid.

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]I don’t really understand what this rant is all about, but for me it lost its credibility with this sentence:

Dude, Superman is DC. Can you imagine Superman fighting next to Wolverine against Doctor Octopus? No, because it would never happen.[/quote]

I wouldn’t know. I never read too many comics as a kid, except for the Phantom.

Superman Vs. Dr. Octopus

It changes little. The point remains the same. Snowden was revealing secret surveillance officially sanctioned yet conducted by a private contractor owned by the Carlyle Group. The reaction to him is not justified. It is perverse and supersad. Americans who could once see through their own behavior based on its absurdity are now oblivious to it. Images such as a naked burning child fleeing a napalm attack no-longer have the impact on the US mindset as they once had. Now you can have your Gitmos, Abu Gharib torture sessions, your scenes of collateral murder, and all you get is a ho hum. Why is that? Snowden is a very very brave man, much braver than superman who need only contend paper villains. It is weird. Weird that no privacy exists anymore and nobody cares. If you are doing nothing wrong, what have you to worry about. That is the hiding place of the moral police.

[quote]Fox wrote:
No. My judgments are from afar, like most of the world.

And, thus, very suspect.[/quote]

I live in the West. Australia is not America granted, but I think they suffer many similar issues including over surveillance of the everyday man.

Nothing heightens the sense of the ridiculous like being in Taipei for Chinese New Year. Hipsters got nothing on these folk.

Superman? I’m more of a Batman person myself.

I stand corrected and lower my head in penance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DC_vs._Marvel

Yeah, it wouldn’t worry me too much if ASIO or whoever else were reading my emails. My correspondence makes pretty boring reading.

But it should work both ways - I should be able to see what my government is doing. After all, democratic governments are supposed to be for the people. I think we are all in for a very long debate on transparency versus the classification of information. A lot of information is needlessly classified - like the vast majority of those diplomatic cables publish by Wikileaks. And it’s not all bad news - for example, courts are starting to recognize the right of citizens to film police. Citizens just need to start turning the same logic back onto their governments: if you are doing nothing wrong then what do you have to hide?

America is good

They should publish Superman’s e-mails.

Admit it, this is all just a call for:

People here (in America) are just plain oblivious. The poor are either too damn busy trying to make ends meet, or waiting in a bread line somewhere getting jerked around for having the audacity to exist in a state of financial lack. Those who are ABOUT to be poor are maybe just this moment in a doctor’s office getting a re-fill on that methadone script. The middle man is standing with hands and feet against opposing walls, trying not to get pinched so hard he ends up under the shoe of one of the few Americans who don’t fit into those three categories and who are buying up senators.

All but the kids of the senators or the owners of the senators are educated in public schools. Public schools that are constantly picked apart and ridiculed by the senators and their owners and always found to be lacking. If you’re not a teacher you may never notice it, but there are NEVER any questions about current events on a standardized test. Do you wonder why that is?

We the sheeple.

[quote=“housecat”]People here (in America) are just plain oblivious. The poor are either too damn busy trying to make ends meet, or waiting in a bread line somewhere getting jerked around for having the audacity to exist in a state of financial lack. Those who are ABOUT to be poor are maybe just this moment in a doctor’s office getting a re-fill on that methadone script. The middle man is standing with hands and feet against opposing walls, trying not to get pinched so hard he ends up under the shoe of one of the few Americans who don’t fit into those three categories and who are buying up senators.

All but the kids of the senators or the owners of the senators are educated in public schools. Public schools that are constantly picked apart and ridiculed by the senators and their owners and always found to be lacking. If you’re not a teacher you may never notice it, but there are NEVER any questions about current events on a standardized test. Do you wonder why that is?

We the sheeple.[/quote]

Shit.
And here we thought you had those claws removed.
Mellow down easy…

[quote=“TheGingerMan”]Shit.
And here we thought you had those claws removed.[/quote]

Who are the we that had those thoughts? Speak their names and see the blood weep from their wounds!

Nothing has been removed but my softer edges, which only serves to winnow and hone the blooded points of the claws. When life gets tough, you gotta get tougher. And it’s been a tough time, again, with near as much lost as there was to lose.

I am in the “free world,” but I am still rockin’.

Except that in the 1940s, DC Comics was known as National Comics.

CORRECTION: I am wrong! This arc of the radio show began in 1946. I listened to the first episode (boring! Superman never even appears) and lo and behold, DC Comics is mentioned. I will turn in my geek license now.

[quote=“Fox”]Few people know that it was the man of steel that ultimately led to the dismantlement of the Ku Klux Klan. But it wasn’t his super strength that did it nor his ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound, it was his X-ray vision. In particular, it was the work of Stetson Kennedy, who became Superman’s X-ray specs as he infiltrated the KKK and revealed to the Marvel Comic writers the secrets of the KKK. It wasn’t, however, the KKK’s dastardly acts that bought them undone. In fact, they were a surreptitious source of celebration across America. It was the humiliation of being revealed. The simple fact that children through out the South pantomimed Superman’s destruction of the KKK using revelations of secret handshakes and other elements of quaint behavior (as they appeared in comic books courtesy of Kennedy’s bravery) which brought the most tight knit debauchery of silliness to its knees. Parents arrived home to see their own children unknowingly ridicule them to the extent of Fred Flintstone being elected grand pooh-bah to the Royal order of the Water Buffalos that they simply abandoned the KKK.

These days , however, the US has lost that simple sense of the ridiculous. It has been drowned out by the rhetoric of certainty. It has become a place of posturing pomposity. To the extent that someone like Ed Snowden is the fool. He is the cock-and-balls on the toilet wall – uncomfortable to look at, weird to explain to children, yet an unavoidable truth. America has become a Supersad place, where X-ray vision has become a liability rather than a super power.[/quote]

I am of the strong opinion that you have never in your life set foot on American soil.

[quote=“Deuce Dropper”][quote=“Fox”]Few people know that it was the man of steel that ultimately led to the dismantlement of the Ku Klux Klan. But it wasn’t his super strength that did it nor his ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound, it was his X-ray vision. In particular, it was the work of Stetson Kennedy, who became Superman’s X-ray specs as he infiltrated the KKK and revealed to the Marvel Comic writers the secrets of the KKK. It wasn’t, however, the KKK’s dastardly acts that bought them undone. In fact, they were a surreptitious source of celebration across America. It was the humiliation of being revealed. The simple fact that children through out the South pantomimed Superman’s destruction of the KKK using revelations of secret handshakes and other elements of quaint behavior (as they appeared in comic books courtesy of Kennedy’s bravery) which brought the most tight knit debauchery of silliness to its knees. Parents arrived home to see their own children unknowingly ridicule them to the extent of Fred Flintstone being elected grand pooh-bah to the Royal order of the Water Buffalos that they simply abandoned the KKK.

These days , however, the US has lost that simple sense of the ridiculous. It has been drowned out by the rhetoric of certainty. It has become a place of posturing pomposity. To the extent that someone like Ed Snowden is the fool. He is the cock-and-balls on the toilet wall – uncomfortable to look at, weird to explain to children, yet an unavoidable truth. America has become a Supersad place, where X-ray vision has become a liability rather than a super power.[/quote]

I am of the strong opinion that you have never in your life set foot on American soil.[/quote]

Who cares? Does that mean one should be devoid of an opinion? I am of the strong opinion that you have never set foot on the moon but I’m sure you know where it is, how it functions, it’s contribution to Earth’s climate, ocean cycles you name it. Not setting foot in America, doesn’t mean I have no idea about America. Only a simpleton would seek that refuge. I am of the strong opinion you have never set foot outside your comfort zone.

The reason why the KKK was celebrated at its inception, and the racist hillbilly nonsense that it became, are very different matters.

By the way, there is a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest on a Tennessee highway. He’s rearing a horse and is surrounded by Confederate flags. But that nostalgia for Confederacy or Forrest-like figures doesn’t extend past the South.

With that out of the way, this.

We already have people who are better qualified at delivering polemics against the United States, in the United States: