“Taipei, CN” - Please make your opinions heard!


#61

Are you folks aware that indefinite detention, reeducation camps, and other forms of political and psychological damage are still being done to folks the CCP is not fond of? They seem to hit especially hard at the edges of their empire–guess where Taiwan is located. Here’s one account of the detention/reeducation process folks in Xinjiang are experiencing. I challenge you to read this piece and continue advocating being annexed by Beijing:

Guy


#62

That’s why I said… not under the current ccp government
Which I think won’t ever change.


#63

I am not being sarcastic, but I wonder if you are? Or perhaps if these experiences are from years ago? As it turns out I travel to two of the cities that you mention regularly, I lived in one before and I have family in an other. And no I have never seen a mother feed her lifeless child from a trashcan… I’ve seen people eating out of bins in several countries. I saw a woman in the US begging from traffic and eating berries from a tree at an intersection in San Francisco. So what? If you look at actual absolute poverty stats for China you will see there has been a huge reduction, and it is close to elimination. Ill post them later, at work now.


#64

Let me help you out

Latest World Bank Poverty Rate in China: 30 million
Latest World Bank Poverty Rate in India: 273 million


#65

even under a different government there is no need for unification. at this point these two country’s are completely different. and what benefit is there in unifying with a shitter country? japan would be a better choice.


#66

Wikipedia puts China’s population at 1,404,000,000.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China

30 million over 1.404 billion is about 2.1 percent.

I can’t explain the discrepancy, but the CIA puts it at 3.3 percent, where the poverty line is 2,300 RMB per year (which the CIA puts at US$400 (under “Economy”), but xe.com puts at about US$361 today).

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ch.html

https://xe.com/currencyconverter/convert/?Amount=2300&From=CNY&To=USD

(All of this, of course, sets aside the issue of trusting a government–any government, not just the Chinese one–a subject to which a bulletin board could be entirely devoted.)


#67

The World Bank links I posted put China’s at 3.1 percent and India’s at 21.9 percent.


#68

So the UK was not a modern democracy in 1943? And it had no role in this:


#69

Yes I agree that was a crime , a war crime that was ignored.

I’m thinking back in the 19th century when the penal laws were in effect in Ireland and also the famines in India at that time, women didn’t have the vote, non landowners or property owners didn’t have the vote, colonised people were repressed and denied the vote and education and land rights.

I’m not making excuses for these policies but they weren’t the same democracies we enjoy today. Even in the UK there were huge local worker movements agitating for more rights in the 19th century.


#70

Uncle Sam should have given Taiwan back to Japan at that stage.
No Taiwan problem today

But it’s possible the problem would have shifted to hainan island


#71

I hear you, but there’s the Cairo Declaration, which apparently wasn’t binding, but I guess the people in charge felt that letting Nationalist China take over Taiwan was the thing to do.

The Japanese didn’t officially relinquish sovereignty over Taiwan until 1951 (when the Treaty of San Francisco was signed) or 1952 (when it became effective), and they didn’t specify a recipient party. I think the reason for that is that Britain wanted sovereignty over Taiwan to go to Communist China, and the U. S. wanted it to go to Nationalist China. I could be wrong, though, as to the reason for there not being a designated transferee, recipient, whatever the term is.

Seems like Taiwan’s always been in a kind of pickle. Things never seem to get to the point where everybody just agrees to give the Taiwanese full authority to decide what they want to do with themselves.


#72

The problem with Cairo is that Cairo requires China to be 1) an US ally and 2)“covet no gain for herself.” China has not satisfied these two prerequisites, therefore the transfer of Taiwan’s sovereignty from Japan to China was called off. Please read Cairo carefully and don’t just cherry-pick.


#73

Japan did not specify a recipient party of Taiwan’s sovereignty because it was not up to Japan to decide. It was up to US. Hence the wording was that Japan renounces the right, the title and the claim (all three) so that US can do what it wanted and when it wanted with Formosa. If you read closely, it does not relieve Japan from any responsibility and liability, even though Japan looses the right and benefits.

If you read closely, if there is no claimant to Formosa, US can still transfer right title and claim to Japan by default.

There is at least one claimant to Formosa, and that is China. However China is prohibited from being entitled to any rights and benefits due to Article 25. Therefore China does not qualify. Suppose Japan, for whatever reason, wanted to let China have Taiwan, Japan still could not do so without violating the Peace Treaty, due to the fact that Japan already renounced the power to transfer any right in Article 2. It’s not up to Japan even if Japan wanted to help China to acquire Formosa.

Furthermore, if Formosa is rendered into chaos and it’s become that Formosa now poses a threat to US (for example became a hotbed of anti-US militant/terrorists groups), Japan could still be liable for neglect. The Peace Treaty does not excuse Japan from not defending Taiwan. (Defending simply means not to allow a territory to fall into hostile hands.)


#74

Funny that , you don’t own the house but you may still be liable for any damage caused by it


#75

And here is China again threatening airlines to remove any suggestion that Taiwan is an independent nation.


#76

#77

So much for soft diplomacy.


#78

I booked a flight on Xiamen Air yesterday and I had a hard time finding Songshan airport. I don’t know where Taipei China is. Finally, I just typed TSA and found it. Xiaman Air is Chinese so I get it, however I expect more from foreign airlines. If there’s a border crossing with immigration, and they use different currency and have a different government, I’m fairly certain it’s a different country.


#79

LOL. And how about you and your people having invaded Taiwan and claimed its sovereignty? There was a time that you were a foreigner here too.


#80

And this is related to…