Taipei Garbage Sorting Mysteries


#1

Hey,
I just moved to Taipei and I can’t seem to get a straight answer on the garbage sorting…

What I was told was “trash” (non-recycling) is put in the expensive city bags, while recycling can be put into ordinary trash bags…is this true?


#2

Hello,

Yes, this is true. You can also put your regular trash first in the cheap bags, which then has to be thrown into the Taipei City bags. They don’t mind if you do that, either.


#3

Also, it is best if you put your recyclables in clear, see-through garbage bags, that way the collectors can see that it contains recyclables. I have known some of the recycling trucks to turn away bags if they can’t see the content.


#4

Do you know of any government sites in English that talk about garbage disposal procedures?


#5

and the recycling truck only comes by on certain days depending on your neighborhood. all very confusing. i just end up asking the filipino maids who gather at trash pick up site what to do.


#6

What do you think about their new policy of bringing your own shopping bags to the store?


#7

Has this new policy started yet? I thought it was next year.

I think it is good idea. While in Germany I was surprised at first as they have a similar policy, but I think it is progressive and environmentally friendly.

It could be kind of annoying, but living in the second most crowded country on the globe sacrifices have to be made.


#8

You know, I saw so many different surveys about the people density of Taiwan. Is it really second after Bangladesh? I saw another survey that said Hong Kong and Singapore are more dense than Taiwan, which makes total sense since they are much, much smaller countries/territories.


#9

Oh yeah, according to news, the policy will be enforced in govt-owned establishments first.


#10

While in Germany I was surprised at first as they have a similar policy, …

Actually it’s not a policy but a recommendation and people got used to it. You can still have plastic bags but need to pay for them.
Cost concious as the Germans are they prefer to bring their own bag or basket.

IMHO a good because environmental friendly idea, not like here in Asia were people throw plastic bags after you.
I hate to buy a drink at 7-11 and get a bag with it!


#11
quote:
Originally posted by thyrdrail: You know, I saw so many different surveys about the people density of Taiwan. Is it really second after Bangladesh? I saw another survey that said Hong Kong and Singapore are more dense than Taiwan, which makes total sense since they are much, much smaller countries/territories.

Don’t know how the figures average out, but certain parts of Taiwan are much more densely populated than others (obviously!).

Yungho used to have the dubious distinction of being the most densely populated spot on the planet – more crowded than Kowloon or Dhaka, even. I don’t know if that’s still true, however.


#12

I thought Mong Kok was the densest place on earth ?


#13

And I thought Mongkok was part of Kowloon. And plus, I probably got my figures from Ripley’s Believe it or Not, so they’re likely to be wrong, anyway.


#14

Since disposable plastic utensils will also be banned, will that mean people have to bring their own to fast food restaurants? I can’t picture KFC supplying silverware.


#15

What’s the point, I ask you? The place is a toxic cesspit. Oh, you have to start somewhere? Crap. Either do it properly (I.e. live up to the whole green island promise) or don’t bother. The locals on their motorbikes just put a mask on, instead of fixing the damn scooter they’re sitting on that is spewing out blue smoke on everyone else.

Until Taiwanese develop a sense of community (not just family or business dealings)there is no hope for a decent environment. Just look at the place!


#16

Country density figures are normally given separately for countries above and below 10m people, to separate off the city states like Singapore and Hong Kong.

Taiwan is densest, after Bangladesh, of these medium+ size places.

But HK, and any city anywhere, will have a higher density than Taiwan.


#17

Cities have denser population pockets but as a country it’s hard to beat Taiwan for density. This became apparent to me the first time I took the express from Taipei to Kaohsiung. I was waiting for the countryside to appear for four hours to no avail. Whoops. Since everybody is stuck on small wedges of land at the bottom of huge mountain ranges what choice is there.
However you can still go to Kenting or up into Nantou and pretty much get away from it all. They don’t like to stray too far from cities except for holidays.


#18

Interesting articles::

SVTC Symposium

Expat Asian Cities Ranking

Environmental Regulations Ranking


#19
quote:
Country density figures are normally given separately for countries above and below 10m people, to separate off the city states like Singapore and Hong Kong. Taiwan is densest, after Bangladesh, of these medium+ size places.

But HK, and any city anywhere, will have a higher density than Taiwan.


I like this sort of population data and recently discovered a cool site called GeoHive. They have a table of population densities here.
Note that the two tables are distinguished based on countires over 5000sq kilometers (where Taiwan ranks 2nd) and under (where Taiwan isn’t even in the top ten - HK and Singapore are 10 times denser and Macau 30 something times denser).

Bri


#20
quote:
Originally posted by NFI: What's the point, I ask you? The place is a toxic cesspit. Oh, you have to start somewhere? Crap. Either do it properly (I.e. live up to the whole green island promise) or don't bother. The locals on their motorbikes just put a mask on, instead of fixing the damn scooter they're sitting on that is spewing out blue smoke on everyone else.

Until Taiwanese develop a sense of community (not just family or business dealings)there is no hope for a decent environment. Just look at the place!


I’ve always thought that the govt. should raise prices on those scooters or maybe on gasoline to discourage usage and encourage public transportation. I think I read somewhere that Singapore and Hong Kong tax highly on automobiles and that each car has some electronic tag that they monitor to limit the days that you can drive into the city. I don’t know if they are still doing that.

I think we can all understand your frustration, but pollution is a major global problem that exists in countries worldwide which can’t be fixed overnight. And regarding Asia, it’s an unfortunate byproduct of rapid economic growth among the developing Asian nations. Right now, their main concern is purely economical, not environmental. It is only when the citizens reach a higher level on the socioeconomic ladder will they appreciate and demand a better standard of living in a clean environment. Taiwan is much more environmentally conscious compared to years past, and much more compared to some other Asian nations. They’re not Finland or Denmark yet, but it’s a process. I don’t think it should be either/or as you suggest. Even a little conservation and recycling is better than nothing. And it takes a while for people to change and/or improve their habits.