Taiwan, Biggest Island in the World with No Sailboats


#1

I understand the history of Taiwan and the bogus worry of the Red Horde coming to take over Taiwan by boat but I think it is about time that Taiwan join the real world, clean up its waterways, and put in a few docks for anyone wanting to park a real boat. For a country so hung up on status and things to possess, you would think having a 40 foot sailboat would do the trick. What is weird is that they are made here “sailboats” but not sailed here. I see a few sailboats come to park every year but it is usually 2-3 and no services are provided. I wonder how the Taiwan government looks the other way on these sailboats. Probably someone getting paid off.

I always laugh when some real estate agent says the property has river view? Here it just means dirty water view. Can you imagine just how beautiful it would be and how it would raise the price of property to actually see something like 40 sailboats going out to sea.

My old friend John, whose father was in the Navy here and went to TAS always said that Taiwan was modern in some ways and backward 50 years in others. I think he was right when it comes to the Taiwan laws on boating.


#2

i agree and disagree. can you imagine all the rampant smuggling that would go on? The fishing boats are heavily policed and yet they smuggle in chinese spirits and cigarrettes and people !

Taiwan was for centuries a place known for its pirates. All sorts of shenanigans could be afoot knowing the taiwanese penchant for “enterprise”.

Taiwanese aint all bout boating in the american sense. And also the waters around the island are pretty treacherous.

Boat wrecks, smuggling, you name it. They will have it.


#3

Gaoxiong harbour has a small marina of sorts, with about a dozen sailing boats, the last time I checked. Maybe a similar number dotted around small harbours along the north coast, and a few on the Danshui river at Gaungdu. I can give you some contact details if you drop me an email.

Yes, I agree, it’s not very good. Part of the problem has been the lack of place that are licensed for these kind of boats. You go into a normal fishing harbour, and you need to be officially listed as a fisherman to keep your fishing boat there. Nothing else is allowed, no checkbox on the form for sailing boats.

It’s changing very slowly, but you need to get a concerted effort from the people who control the ports, the people who police the ports, the people who create the legislation, and a bunch of others. For most of them, your concerns are not important.


#4

there is a lot of water sport activity going on near Luzhou on the river there, not sure what but it looks promising.

Also a fun little aside: Taiwan makes more yachts than any other country.


#5

They’ve been developing dapeng bay in the south for years to be a sailing center. Doing exactly what the Op wanted: cleaning up the area, putting in new infrastructure. Should have been ready years ago but the KMT held up the budget during the last years of CSB admin.

They just opened that cool bridge across the lagoon this year that will allow boats to sail in. First regatta too:


#6

[quote=“Deuce Dropper”]there is a lot of water sport activity going on near Luzhou on the river there, not sure what but it looks promising.

Also a fun little aside: Taiwan makes more yachts than any other country.[/quote]

Yes that is quite ironic. Taiwan has for decades been the worlds largest exporter of yachts (up to bout 50feet). Taiwan specializes in cabin cruisers and 50footer sailboats.


#7

Yeah, but then they’d probably allow powerboats, too- and they’ll drive those the way they drive cars and scooters…


#8

So can you privately own and operate a boat here then?


#9

Sure! Just register it as a fishing boat! :smiley:


#10

I dunno.

Ellesmere Island is far bigger than Taiwan and I bet they don’t have any marinas or sailboats either.


#11

As to Taiwan being the “Biggest Island in the World”…I will let others debate the merits, or lack of, that statement.

As to sail boats being available to the general populace. todays China Post has a rather prominent advert for a MacGregor 26 for sale @ NT$1,500,000 not inclusive of dockage fees.

I will add that I do agree with the absence of boating life, and the attendant opportunities, available here on the island…quite amazing.


#12

Greenland is the biggest island in the world with no sailing boats.


#13

Tainan has a busy little harbor and sailing community with mirrors, radials and bytes. We also have kite surfing, windsurfing, surfing and they just started water skiing in the inner harbor.

But I wouldn’t come here as Tainan doesn’t exist. Don’t come down south.


#14

It’s improved vs a very low base, but still sucks. Take a look at Singapore or Hong Kong for proper sailing.

Owning anything other than a dingy is a a major PIA in Taiwan. The windsurfing on the other hand, is excellent. :thumbsup:


#15

Really? That’s great.


#16

I just moved back to Taiwan having lived in San Francisco now for the last 25 years. Aside from searching out for the local sailing crowd I am also in looking to get my own sailboat sometime within the year as well as a local boating license. From all my research thus far I’ve met a local sailboat manufacturer (Argentinian design) and learned the intricacies of obtaining a local boating license + owning recreational boats. I also found someone that started a sailing charter business with a 28’ sloop in Kenting whom I plan to visit often. If someone here have discovered any local sailing crowds, I would love to know about them. I’m also more than happy to share the limited information I have if anyone’s interested. -Justin


#17

And yet, strangely, Taiwan is one of the leading manufacturers of luxury yachts:

http://www.culture.tw/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1752&Itemid=157

[quote]Popularly dubbed the “Yacht Kingdom,” Taiwan ranks high among the major yacht builders on the world. Customs data shows that the export value of yachts reached US$250 million in 2006 and soared to US$350 million in 2008, an annual growth rate of 17.1%.

In 2010, Taiwan stands 7th in the world in orders received in the mega yacht (80 to 120 feet) category according to an investigation by renowned ShowBoats International magazine for its December 2009 issue. [/quote]


#18

I hear the word “die” everywhere I go. Is it me, or are the locals obsessed with “dying”.

SAILBOAT comment at the end. THANKS!

Be careful, if you fall into the water you’ll die.

Be careful, the dog will bite. It will bite you until you die.

Be careful, drinking cold drinks is bad for your health. It will eventually lead to death. You’ll die.

It it so bothersome, I might just die.

She is so annoying, A person will die.

Be careful, (anything) or you’ll die.

Don’t get a tan, you’ll look ugly. So ugly in fact, I’ll just die.

I don’t like the taste of water. Water has no taste.* (not about dying)

Shark fin is expensive, it must be delicious. (does not care about sharks dying so that they can have their spoonful of cartridge)

You have a sailboat?! It can kill you right? You might die when you get lost out at sea. Have you seen the Titanic?
People can die out at sea.


#19

[quote=“michaelcrace”]I understand the history of Taiwan and the bogus worry of the Red Horde coming to take over Taiwan by boat but I think it is about time that Taiwan join the real world, clean up its waterways, and put in a few docks for anyone wanting to park a real boat. For a country so hung up on status and things to possess, you would think having a 40 foot sailboat would do the trick. What is weird is that they are made here “sailboats” but not sailed here. I see a few sailboats come to park every year but it is usually 2-3 and no services are provided. I wonder how the Taiwan government looks the other way on these sailboats. Probably someone getting paid off.

I always laugh when some real estate agent says the property has river view? Here it just means dirty water view. Can you imagine just how beautiful it would be and how it would raise the price of property to actually see something like 40 sailboats going out to sea.

My old friend John, whose father was in the Navy here and went to TAS always said that Taiwan was modern in some ways and backward 50 years in others. I think he was right when it comes to the Taiwan laws on boating.[/quote]

I can’t imagine this happening; (1) Taiwanese people are not that wealthy enough to support a large boating scene. You may think everyone is getting along alright, but then look at the quality of the stuff they use and the food they eat. It’s getting worse, too, with the recent ‘‘modernization efforts’’; and (2) Chinese people are afraid of water for the most part.


#20

Its the Taiwanese aborigine that got in little boats and populated much of the pacific. The han taiwanes are land lubbers ,always have been.

They dont even have swimming pools at most schools.