Taiwan damp

We returned from a few weeks holiday to find the inside of our house and the kitchen in particular covered in mould. Just wondering what the health implications are… is this kind of damp particularly unhealthy? I know some types of mould are very bad for you, but waht about standard house mould?

Mold is not good, dude. Get a dehumidifier and leave it on all day, till that stuff dries up. It’s really cheap to run dehumidifiers, btw.

Try to clean as much of it away as you can (now, and then later when what’s left dries up).

I hear you, it certainly looks lethal when it’s everywhere.

Just saw this:

[quote]Should I be concerned about mold in my home?
Yes, if the contamination is extensive. When airborne mold spores are present in large numbers, they can cause allergic reactions, asthma episodes, infections, and other respiratory problems for people. Exposure to high spore levels can cause the development of an allergy to the mold. Mold can also cause structural damage to your home. Similary, when wood goes through a period of wetting, then drying, it can eventually warp and cause walls to crack or become structurally weak.[/quote]

I don’t know where San Mateo is, but that looks like a potential earthquake issue for someone living in Taiwan.

HG

4 years ago I had no idea about dehumidifiers and mould and we had wet bed clothing, black mould on the bedroom wallls and green stuff growing in many of the cupboards. It was disgusting.

I run one in the bedroom during the day in high humidity and one in the laundry to dry the washing and keep the stored clothes dry and one in the general living area.

We have just been away for 2 weeks and left a good quality (high capacity) dehumidifier running with a hose running into a kitchen drain pipe.

It was a pleasure to return and see 55% humidity on the hygrometer and have a clean smell inside the house.

we have dehumidifers but an architect mate said they are a very high fire danger electrical item which is why we didnt leave them on.

spent a buch of time cleaning the house and will do more tonight… :help:

its odd but the first floor of our place copped it more than upstairs.

High fire danger? It’s very low power, so it’s not cos of that. Anything you leave plugged in is considered a fire hazard, including your TV, fridge, washing machine, etc. I’m sure it’s no more risky than any of those. It’s not like you’re leaving the gas tap on, or bare wires in a puddle of water.

soemthing to do with the switching mechansim. i suppose if you leave it running into a drain it might work

soemthing to do with the switching mechansim. I suppose if you leave it running into a drain it might work[/quote]

Well I guess some are more reliable than others. You mean it might not cut out when it fills up with water, right? Best person to ask would be a firefighter. My friend back home reckons washing machines are pretty dangerous, for example. He knows cos he’s been to several fires caused by them.

Yeah, ask ironman about the drain option. I’ve never needed it, to be honest.

ah well. looks like another night filled with hours of cleaning

[quote=“AWOL”]we have dehumidifers but an architect mate said they are a very high fire danger electrical item which is why we didnt leave them on.
[/quote]

Have to agree. I wouldn’t leave one on unattended. I had a friend here who came home to find his dehumidifier melted into his livingroom floor. Could’ve burned the whole building down.

I’m sure that had everything to do with leaving it unattended and nothing to do with quality.

[quote=“Flicka”][quote=“AWOL”]we have dehumidifers but an architect mate said they are a very high fire danger electrical item which is why we didnt leave them on.
[/quote]

Have to agree. I wouldn’t leave one on unattended. I had a friend here who came home to find his dehumidifier melted into his livingroom floor. Could’ve burned the whole building down.[/quote]

Sounds like a great reason to buy Japanese made dehumidifiers and avoid the Taiwanese or Chinese ones so you have the best chance of high quality. Also, a good reason to keep the batteries changed in bedroom and kitchen smoke alarms.

Mine could happily melt down as its sitting in the middle of a tiled floor. I’ll still leave it on. I’m also not quite sure how you’d deal with this if you were not watching it 24 hours a day so you could switch it off as it started burning anyway unless you were responding to your smoke alarm that most people don’t have.

I never run one in the bedroom while sleeping because of the noise. Now it will be because of the noise and fire danger.

If you want to talk danger I’d be looking more closely at those gas instant hot water heaters. They scare the hell out of me.

Regarding mould, I found that after cleaning it all away, it came back within a few weeks/months (winter time). I then found that spraying ceilings/walls with an aerosol disinfectant (from any supermarket) after cleaning really helps keep it away. The disinfectant smell only lasts a day or so. This year I purchased a dehumidifier - which, combined with the disinfectant spray has solved the whole problem.

you can get a non-electrical one. I mean, those little plastic boxes at Watson suck up the water quite well. a few of those will do ya… and they’re cheap. They look like air fresheners. sorry i know i’m not being specific… nor much of a help

Buy a concentrated liquid disinfectant, and add that to your cleaning fluid, and you won’t need to spray; the spray itself is hard on the lungs anyway, IMO. After you clean, don’t wash it away with water; just leave the cleaning fluid residue on after wiping, and that will end the problem. Be sure to check any leather goods you have in your drawers and closet to make sure they aren’t molding too, btw. I spray my shoes and jacket with Lysol, hang them to dry thoroughly in front of a fan, then seal the jacket in a plastic bag for the summer with several very large dessicant bags (purchased at Dihua St. in Taipei), otherwise it tends to start molding by the time I bring it out in late Nov.

I worry about the water capacityof those little things.

Considering that I can leave a dehumidifier running in a small room for a day and accumulate 10 litres of fluid and how much can the little plastic box hold?

1 litre once only. If so you need up to 10 a day. Seems either ineffective or very expensive depending how you go about it.

To keep clothes in a closet dry and mold free, mount a light bulb in the closet. A 25 watt works well. Just leave it turned on but make sure nothing flammable is close to it. Works well.

Does anyone believe humidity causes one to feel tired?

Or is it caused by the mold (resulting from humidity)?

(I’m talking about indoors by the way)

I am paying extra attention to this, and I want to ban anything from my house that could grow mold or dust mites…

This because I found out that some bookshelves in my house are covered in MOLD. I mean specifically those cheap bookcases you can buy for around 200 NT$ (about a meter high) where you can see the screws at the sides. I have a couple of those. These things are nothing less than mold farms!!! (it’s in the material, I’m sure; it’s probably made of the cheapest recycled wood available, hence the low price). (By the way, I use a new AC in my apartment, and still the mold grows on them, and none of my other furniture has the problem)

[quote=“Ectoplasma”]Does anyone believe humidity causes one to feel tired?

Or is it caused by the mold (resulting from humidity)?

(I’m talking about indoors by the way)

I am paying extra attention to this, and I want to ban anything from my house that could grow mold or dust mites…

This because I found out that some bookshelves in my house are covered in MOLD. I mean specifically those cheap bookcases you can buy for around 200 NT$ (about a meter high) where you can see the screws at the sides. I have a couple of those. These things are nothing less than mold farms!!! (it’s in the material, I’m sure; it’s probably made of the cheapest recycled wood available, hence the low price). (By the way, I use a new AC in my apartment, and still the mold grows on them, and none of my other furniture has the problem)[/quote]

Humidity and temperature can make you feel tired and lazy. When you go over 20C, humidity makes the “feels like” temperature go up. So 29C with 90% feels closer to probably 40C (thats a guess -there is some formula to calculate the correct temp value)

Mold through their spores can play on your allergies so making you feel tired

Throw those bookcases out

[quote=“Ironman”][quote=“Flicka”][quote=“AWOL”]we have dehumidifers but an architect mate said they are a very high fire danger electrical item which is why we didnt leave them on.
[/quote]

Have to agree. I wouldn’t leave one on unattended. I had a friend here who came home to find his dehumidifier melted into his livingroom floor. Could’ve burned the whole building down.[/quote]

Sounds like a great reason to buy Japanese made dehumidifiers and avoid the Taiwanese or Chinese ones so you have the best chance of high quality. Also, a good reason to keep the batteries changed in bedroom and kitchen smoke alarms.
[/quote]

Yeah thats a good idea. There are always cheap brands and models with seeminly dodgy UL safety certification available.

There is also the tendancy here to overload power sockets, circuits and have too big a fuse or circuit breaker (they will never trip). To many apartment and house owners use Drunken Uncle Lee to wire or rewire their apartments. Drunken Uncle Lee should stick to delievering gas