Taiwanese Mandarin Teacher in Hong Kong

Hi all,

I live in Hong Kong and am looking for a mandarin teacher from Taiwan who teaches private mandarin lessons in Hong Kong.

I am interested in learning colloquial mandarin as spoken in Taiwan (or if you need to be more specific, mandarin as commonly spoken in Taipei), as opposed to the standard PRC version of mandarin. I am aware there are substantial differences with some words/phrasings/etc.

If it makes any difference I am beginner/early intermediate and know about 500 words and can hold basic conversation but want to increase my vocabulary and generally get more practice.

Can anyone help me out?

Thanks

This is a sincere question: At a five hundred word base, isn’t it a bit early to be diving into [strike]dialectical[/strike] dialectal differences?

I have had to get into [strike]dialectical[/strike] dialectal derivations (or rather, unlearning some of mine, from Mexican/Guatemalan Spanish), but I certainly wouldn’t do it with less than a 3,000 non-cognate word base.

[quote=“ehophi”]This is a sincere question: At a five hundred word base, isn’t it a bit early to be diving into dialectical differences?

I have had to get into dialectical derivations (or rather, unlearning some of mine, from Mexican/Guatemalan Spanish), but I certainly wouldn’t do it with less than a 3,000 non-cognate word base.[/quote]

Dialectal. Sorry, it’s a pet peeve, I made it through an hour long presentation in grad school before my prof. mentioned (during the question and answer portion) that I’d been using dialectical erroneously the entire time. So now it pokes me in the eye with my own inadequacy whenever I see the word used in place of dialectal.

Some lexicographers seem okay with it. Others don’t.

I was academically reared to use the word “dialectic” (adj.) exclusively for the first Dictionary.com sense.

[quote=“ehophi”]Some lexicographers seem okay with it. Others don’t.

I was academically reared to use the word “dialectic” (adj.) exclusively for the first Dictionary.com sense.[/quote]

I’d think, considering your background in logics, you’d reserve it’s use for that area. I’ve never heard dialectical used in place of dialectal from any of the professionals in my field, nor in any academic article I’ve read (and cultural and linguistic differences are something I both work with and have researched). Though perhaps we just differ.

“Its…” It’s minor peeve of mine, but meh…

“Its…” It’s minor peeve of mine, but meh…[/quote]

Good to know. I had been using it as a possessive -s and looking it up I see you’re right, thank you.