Taiwanese TV obsession

The one good thing about Taiwanese TV is when someone says “Aren’t all Americans blah blah blah? I’ve seen it on American tv shows/movies, so it has to be true!!!”

Then I ask them if all Taiwanese are like the people portrayed on Taiwanese soap operas and talk shows … and they kind of get the point … kind of … :unamused:

[quote=“LittleBuddhaTW”]The one good thing about Taiwanese TV is when someone says “Aren’t all Americans blah blah blah? I’ve seen it on American tv shows/movies, so it has to be true!!!”

Then I ask them if all Taiwanese are like the people portrayed on Taiwanese soap operas and talk shows … and they kind of get the point … kind of … :unamused:[/quote]

LittleBuddhaTW, I like the fact that there are often foreign people on the telly to try and explain why the Taiwanese view point is wrong. I haven’t seen that level of foreign integration on home soil. Usually in the UK they will ask an ‘expert,’ which as you will know is like asking my toenail what it thinks about something. The Taiwanese do try to get a different perspective on their narrow views, and that should be saluted. Also, I think that on the chat shows they do knock their own culture too. But I have faced the “Americans in movies always get divorced, so one day you will leave my daughter,” stupidity. I just point out that A) I am not American B) Life does not always reflect art (GAMMA?) C) Just be patient Mr Dao! (The biggest rock is worn away by a little stream…)

[quote=“LittleBuddhaTW”]
Then I ask them if all Taiwanese are like the people portrayed on Taiwanese soap operas and talk shows … and they kind of get the point … kind of … :unamused:[/quote]

But … my wife IS like the gals on the show.

:astonished:

:s

My wife is not watching much TV, but if there is something she likes it is terrible. She will stick to it like hypnosis or so. Now she has one of this soaps and it is terrible. From ten to eleven pm you just can reach her in advertisment breaks and as soon as they are over you will lose her attencion on the second.
And the soap it self is just, hm, stupid and 30 times more or less the same. But she likes it as it is Korean and “sooo much better than the Taiwanese ones”. :unamused:

But if I watch a game and I better listen and be aware of everything… :loco:

She: watches TV

… 5 minutes later:

(she cries out) “I am so depressed!”

I come, take her in my arms, discuss our life and stuff with her, she sniffs and hugs to me …

SUDDENLY: go away! (I get a violent push)

Commercial break is over, she is watching again.

… 5 minutes later:

(she cries out) “I think you do not love me anymore!”

I come, take her in my arms, discuss our life and stuff with her, she sniffs and hugs to me …

SUDDENLY: go away! (I get a violent push)

Commercial break is over, she is watching again.

… 5 minutes later:

… OK one day I will learn it!

Just what I need. While No. 1 cleans her feet on my trouser (she does!) No. 2 uses my shirt to relieve her nose (she does!).

:astonished: Poor Malaysians (just been there), the guys there can marry 4 women now :help:

[quote=“bob_honest”]Just what I need. While No. 1 cleans her feet on my trouser (she does!) No. 2 uses my shirt to relieve her nose (she does!).

[/quote]
Just how desperate are you for female companionship?
Actually, the country bumpkin/uncivilized behaviour is a nice segue into the explanation of why the Taiwanese watch so much TV: it’s because they didn’t have TV in the recent past. Taiwan is a newly industrialized society: people in their 30s may not have gone to high school, may not have had electricity in their homes when they were young, etc. It’s the same in China - TV is a fucking miracle, and when you are the first or second generation to have it in your family, you’re going to spend a lot of time glued to the set. Western countries, where they’ve had TVs since its invention, have evolved enough to see the downside.
I know people back home who do not have TV and don’t want it because they consider it a waste of time. I never met anyone who thought it was a waste of time when I was teaching in the hills of Sichuan. There, if you could afford it, it was on all the time.

:offtopic: I think this kind of thinking explains many cultural phenomena here.
I think the reason everyone here drives like a bunch of morons is explained by this.
I think the fact so many don’t limit junk food consumption is explained by this.
I think leaving house lights on is explained by this.
I think morons who leave their scooters running when they go buy things can be explained by this.
I think businesses leaving the AC on and the door open.
The AC in the summer (while wearing jackets inside) and the wearing coats inside in the winter when the heater is set on boil…
Girls who wear so much damned perfume it gags everyone near them.

All this shit is explained by the fact that mommy didn’t learn from grandmommy who didn’t learn from greatgrandmommy.
Half the things my mother taught me were premised with “my mom always told me” :blah:
Since a lot of the things we take for granted are things that are new here or things that are only recently readily available to so many people, there is not the wisdom of generations being passed down.

My parents didn’t allow me to watch TV when I was a kid. They said it would rot my brain. Most of my friends were only allowed to watch a set amount every day.
But when my mom was a kid, she would watch it for hours… it was new and cool.

Wife watches TV talk show
Guest on show imparts some kind of “wisdom”
Wife says, “See? You shouldn’t (or should) do what he says.”
Chris grudgingly accepts a new rule or restriction into his life…

I believe that this is symptomatic of another, wider issue. Taiwanese women keep their partners balls tightly gripped in their hands at all times. (Without any hope of a gentle massage!) Her failure to understand that she is doing something that A) ridiculously constitutes as a ‘date!!!’ B: You don’t have any hope of understanding or enjoying the thing she is doing, C: She is unhappy when you interrupt her to ask for clarification over words.

I say the title of the thread should be: Why do we let our women watch so much T.V.? Then we’d really cut to the chase…

Have we a choice in the matter? Words like “let” mean nothing to my wife.

You can gain a deeper understanding of Taiwanese society by joining your wife or girlfriend on the sofa to watch those talk shows and local soaps from time to time.

I, for instance, have learnt from the soaps that Taiwanese people slap each other’s faces – especially parents admonishing their grown-up children and couples lashing out at each other with vicious backhanders – as a matter of routine every ten or fifteen minutes. I’d never have cottoned onto that from just observing the people around me.

Geez, is Omni the only one to see the inherit upside in all this?

You plug 'em into the telly, let 'em get comfy and grunt a few “huhs” and “ohs” while soaking up enough soap goss to stun your Chinese colleagues the next day. When you’re bored or the Taiwanese language content has swamped your abilities you slip out to post on Forumosa or head to the pub with your mates. Once outside the door the grip on your testicles loosens and you may even begin to breathe properly.

Be sure to get back in time to move them off the couch to bed. I suggest you shower and change first so it looks like you never left other than for polite ablutions.

Such a fob, I can’t agree with your list. I think it can be better summarised as a mix of fatalism for the driving a fear of ghosts for the lights and a desire to show that modern living overcomes scary natural forces for the air cons, heaters and running scooters.

Possibly too the perfume though I have always assume over-perfumed women are menstruating, smokers that have shot their noses, or both.

As for the not learning from mommy, I think there is plenty more positives that people do learn. The things that make Taiwan a great place. Social grease for one, the little gift giving and nice words most foreigners never seem to pick up on for another.

HG

[quote=“LittleBuddhaTW”]…
Then I ask them if all Taiwanese are like the people portrayed on Taiwanese soap operas and talk shows … and they kind of get the point … kind of … :unamused:[/quote]

in short … yes they are! :smiley:

Omni, I know you were being tongue and cheek and all and a serious reply is not actually in order… BUT…
What do you mean you would never gather this without watching TV?? I NEVER watch TV and I know this. I even frequently ask my boyfriend why (and he acts like I am asking why the sky is blue).
Even worse, though, if the white guy I saw slapping around his girlfriend near ZhiShan Station once. :noway:
Not that him doing it is worse, but having to see it felt worse than seeing locals do it to each other.

[quote=“Huang Guang Chen”]
Such a fob, I can’t agree with your list. I think it can be better summarised as a mix of fatalism for the driving a fear of ghosts for the lights and a desire to show that modern living overcomes scary natural forces for the air cons, heaters and running scooters. [/quote]
I must disagree. Being that the only superstitious Taiwanese person I know is my boyfriend. I doubt that anything like that has shit to do with it. Most of the people i know only burn paper because it is tradition and card and air conditioners and bikes haven’t been around long enough for tradition to effect them.

[quote=“Huang Guang Chen”]
Possibly too the perfume though I have always assume over-perfumed women are menstruating, smokers that have shot their noses, or both.[/quote]
I think this is because mommy doesn’t tell them when they are little how to wear it. And menstruation would not cause you to need perfume. Unless you had something, that is.

[quote=“Huang Guang Chen”]
As for the not learning from mommy, I think there is plenty more positives that people do learn. The things that make Taiwan a great place. Social grease for one, the little gift giving and nice words most foreigners never seem to pick up on for another. [/quote]
I was referring to not learning the technology things from mommy. Of course manners have nothing to do with such.
If you are going to respond to a post you should READ IT not skim it.

Check again, fear of ghosties runs very deep. If you want to test it, tell a supposedly non-superstitous Taiwanese you’ve just seen a ghost, or better still, as they sit in your lounge, tell them you’r neighbour told you the previous tenants were all wiped out in a murder/suicide involving a crazed daddy and a watermelon knife. Then get up and go and make some tea.

Aware what you were talking about but I took it elsewheres.

Bestest.

HG

[quote=“bababa”][quote=“bob_honest”]Just what I need. While No. 1 cleans her feet on my trouser (she does!) No. 2 uses my shirt to relieve her nose (she does!).

[/quote]
Just how desperate are you for female companionship?
Actually, the country bumpkin/uncivilized behaviour is a nice segue into the explanation of why the Taiwanese watch so much TV: it’s because they didn’t have TV in the recent past. Taiwan is a newly industrialized society: people in their 30s may not have gone to high school, may not have had electricity in their homes when they were young, etc. It’s the same in China - TV is a f***ing miracle, and when you are the first or second generation to have it in your family, you’re going to spend a lot of time glued to the set. Western countries, where they’ve had TVs since its invention, have evolved enough to see the downside.
I know people back home who do not have TV and don’t want it because they consider it a waste of time. I never met anyone who thought it was a waste of time when I was teaching in the hills of Sichuan. There, if you could afford it, it was on all the time.[/quote]

That’s the difference with our (my) generation in Belgium … we had TV from around 1964, B/W … we lived in Germany at the time and were a little more advanced than in Belgium where most peole got TV from around 66-67 … and back than there were no TV satellites and no 24 hour broadcasting so our time spent in front of it was limited from about 6:00 PM to 11:00PM -12:00 AM … in a way people are spoiled now … but when TV was on, almost everyone was gathered around it …

[quote=“Chris”]Wife watches TV talk show
Guest on show imparts some kind of “wisdom”
Wife says, “See? You shouldn’t (or should) do what he says.”
Chris grudgingly accepts a new rule or restriction into his life…[/quote]

I always tell my wife to never believe what they say on TV … her answer … yeah right, you know everything, you’re smart and that’s why I married you … :s

Do you think that people that live in Taipei believe the sky is actually blue?

GEEEEEEZ!!!

I don