Taking on the 'weak'

[quote=“cfimages”]…
It’s a thread about young bicycle riders who ride 2 -3- 4 and even 5 abreast in traffic lanes.
I have to deal with it every day. It is unsafe and slows traffic.
…[/quote]

That’s what they do in everything … walking 4-5 abreast and blocking flow on the sidewalk, in the shoppingmall, MRT/train station …

Except for in those western countries that specifically require cyclists to ride on the pavement most of the time, such as Germany. Not all western countries are the same, you know.

Some people feel that putting the cyclists in the pavement with the pedestrians is a good thing. It keeps them away from the nasty aggressive car drivers. Others feel that it forces pedestrians to deal with nasty aggressive cyclists.

Going back to the OP for a moment, the article didn’t specify who was at fault in the reported accidents. They were just ‘bicycle-related’. Does that mean cyclists hit by car drivers who couldn’t maintain a safe distance? Or cars smashed up after being rammed by aggressively overtaking bicycles?

[quote=“TainanCowboy”][quote=“llama_lout”]Why single out idiot cyclists from the idiot truck drivers, idiot car drivers, idiot pedestrians, idiot farm vehicle drivers who all wander blindly around the roads in their hermetically sealed “I’m-the-only-person-who-exists” bubbles.
Remember: Laws and safety regulations are for other people, not for you![/quote]
Because thats is what the thread is about.

It’s a thread about young bicycle riders who ride 2 -3- 4 and even 5 abreast in traffic lanes.
I have to deal with it every day. It is unsafe and slows traffic.
Got it?[/quote]

I think I get the idea that the vast majority of locals don’t get the fact that their behavior,as cyclists or whatever, is selfish and their behaviour is nonconsequential.

I don’t understand Taiwanese culture.

[quote=“The Raven”]Except for in those western countries that specifically require cyclists to ride on the pavement most of the time, such as Germany. Not all western countries are the same, you know.

Some people feel that putting the cyclists in the pavement with the pedestrians is a good thing. It keeps them away from the nasty aggressive car drivers. Others feel that it forces pedestrians to deal with nasty aggressive cyclists.[/quote]
If cyclist are required to ride on the pavement in Germany then usually the pavement is divided, either marked by lines and signage or different colors. Only kids below a certain age (can’t recall the exact age) must cycle on the pavement, even it’s only for pedestrians. Further the laws are strict for endangering pedestrians, regardless if this is done by car or bicycle.

Which makes me conclude that the brains of locals can’t follow evolution, it still thinks it’s in the sixties when only ox carts and pedestrians were on the road …

Rhetorical question: Don’t they teach road safety in schools here? :loco:

Would it matter if they did? As soon as the children are out of school, parents will show otherwise, the right way to not follow the rules … and, ma & pa are right …

please don’t tar all cyclists with the same brush. there are many different cyclists out there: some of them careful and aware of their surroundings, some of them complete numb skulls.

the thread should be about stupid road users, not cyclists in general.

i ride in a way that is safe for me, as i have zero protection from other road users (two ton blind car drivers in particular). i ride about 200-250km per week, so it is in my interest to stay as safe as possible. very occasionally that means riding on the pavement or running a red or a stop sign to get to a safe place to wait away from traffic. it always involves thinking of the cars and bikes around me. nad yes, when i ride at the same speed as a car, i will defend my right to use the lane as much as i can, by aggressive positioning, acceleration and overtaking when required, and making definite eye contact wrth the drivers around me. cyclists are legitimate road users too, despite what you may think.

and i am often much faster in city traffic than you, so don’t complain that a bike holds you up… thankfully the city parts of my rides are ten-twenty minutes at the beginning and end of a ride, the rest of the time is spent in the mountains away from most of the idiots.

[quote=“llama_lout”]I think I get the idea that the vast majority of locals don’t get the fact that their behavior,as cyclists or whatever, is selfish and their behaviour is nonconsequential.

I don’t understand Taiwanese culture.[/quote]L L -
I agree completely.

Ditto to the Q Annubis asked.

[quote=“TainanCowboy”][quote=“llama_lout”]I think I get the idea that the vast majority of locals don’t get the fact that their behavior,as cyclists or whatever, is selfish and their behaviour is nonconsequential.

I don’t understand Taiwanese culture.[/quote]L L -
I agree completely. [/quote]

You agree that llama lout doesn’t understand Taiwanese culture?

If I’m on my little aborigine farmer motorcycle, or riding downtown on my bicycle, or crossing a busy intersection on foot, I like having a mass of other motorcycles/bicycles or pedestrians around me… there’s safety in numbers. There’s nothing scarier than crossing an empty intersection here, even on a green light; especially on a green light. There are some flashy scooter peckerheads out there alright, but the cars are the real enemy: sudden four-wheeled death.

At risk of being on-topic …

How would they fail to keep a safe driving distance? It’s not like they are doing 50-60km/h[/quote]

Well for a start, almost all bikes here are ancient crappy ones with no brakes. In many cases quite literally no brakes. They just coast to a halt dragging their feet. If a car in front of them did a sharp stop they’d have no chance.

Not to mention those bendy handlebars that let people sit upright, thereby having no constant pressure on the bars and so swerving violently all over the road …

Ah, yes … the old conundrum of Taiwan being home to bike companies selling the most advanced racing models while featuring a populace that prefers something little more advanced than a penny-farthing.

That’s an over generalization. Even here in deepest BFE there are a lot of people going out and buying modern bikes and discovering cycling as a fun healthful family activity. There’s also an awareness and sense of local pride that Taiwan is home to several prestigious brands. I see all kinds of bikes here, from the corn lady hawking ‘huan mei’ from the back of her ghetto commuter bike, to the middle and high school kids who hang out at the bike shop in Linyuan, and meet up after school to go downhilling near the Fong Shan Reservoir.

Perhaps in BFE nobody has to worry about getting their bikes stolen, but here in the the TPE all my neighbors have the rattiest for their daily use … which if they have no brakes could lead to more accidents.

Don’t you big city cats have locks and keep your bikes indoors when not in use?

A question to all those with children here: Do you allow your kids to bike/scooter to school?

I dread the moment I’m asked if my one could go to school on own steam. :frowning: