Taoyuan Airport traffic delays

Starting July 1, expect a longer trip to the airport. :frowning:
taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003644635

What ever happened to the airport rail-link?

It’s under perpetual construction. :roflmao:

situation normal, completely fucked up…they’ve given up even giving an estimated date for opening…

They aren’t making the car/bus/road link longer to make the MRT link more attractive, are they? Too 3rd world for them.

Why is the airport link so hard? Should have been a no brainer. Oh sorry , apparently it IS a NO Brainer, like in Brainless, that project.

I am frustrated because the reasons cited for it not being currently open is that the line can’t meet the design specification for speed and time. And the gap is something like 33 minutes (design) and 35 minutes (current status). There better be something else going on because I don’t give a damn about 2 minutes. I want to stop riding that shuttle (that takes 20 minutes longer now) from the HSR station.

2 minutes doesn’t sound like much but you can’t fix a schedule with that lag going on. Also no one will sign off the final approval until design specs are met.

[quote=“yyy”]Starting July 1, expect a longer trip to the airport. :frowning:
taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003644635[/quote]
Until May 2018!! :astonished:

2 minutes doesn’t sound like much but you can’t fix a schedule with that lag going on. Also no one will sign off the final approval until design specs are met.[/quote]

Well you could simply fix an alternative and slightly less optimal schedule, which also lets me suspect that there are deeper issues involved.

I think there were other safety related issues, like failing to stop at the designated station by, say, a tiny margin of 200 meters.

Taiwan should outsource anything rail related to the Japanese. Those people know what they’re doing.

they are using a Japanese contractor.

According to this article there is a lot more going on than just the travel times but that was given as the headline/main reason. It wouldn’t be difficult at all to make a new slightly slower schedule. The other issues include damaged cables and rail pads and emergency braking triggered for no reason on trains. And malfunctioning toilets.

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003642175

I heard that one train slid hundreds of meters down the track , some parts are pretty steep.

they are using a Japanese contractor.

According to this article there is a lot more going on than just the travel times but that was given as the headline/main reason. It wouldn’t be difficult at all to make a new slightly slower schedule. The other issues include damaged cables and rail pads and emergency braking triggered for no reason on trains. And malfunctioning toilets.

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003642175[/quote]

If they used a Japanese contractor, then how did they have all those electrical problems a year or two ago? Japanese are usually very good at quality and trying to avoid making mistakes, so I have to wonder who is actually doing the work.

[quote=“nonredneck”]

If they used a Japanese contractor, then how did they have all those electrical problems a year or two ago? Japanese are usually very good at quality and trying to avoid making mistakes, so I have to wonder who is actually doing the work.[/quote]

Great job stereotyping.

They might use a Japanese contractor but they didn’t import an entire work crew of 100’s or 1000’s to build it. And just because someone is Japanese doesn’t mean that they don’t make mistakes.

[quote=“Abacus”][quote=“nonredneck”]

If they used a Japanese contractor, then how did they have all those electrical problems a year or two ago? Japanese are usually very good at quality and trying to avoid making mistakes, so I have to wonder who is actually doing the work.[/quote]

Great job stereotyping.

They might use a Japanese contractor but they didn’t import an entire work crew of 100’s or 1000’s to build it. And just because someone is Japanese doesn’t mean that they don’t make mistakes.[/quote]

Japanese are human, no disagreement there. They aren’t perfect, but they tend to plan better, try to avoid mistakes, and make their stuff last longer. Whereas Taiwanese just seem to throw stuff together with little planning (like how they built Taipei during the economic boom) Having to rip out the whole electrical system because of substandard wiring is something I would expect Taiwanese to do, but not Japanese. That is either a serious screw-up or some serious corruption on the part of the Japanese contractor. It can happen, but it’s not what I would expect.

I am not familiar with this project, but aren’t they usually executed by a complex consortium of companies? Harmonization of their work is usually one of the challenges. I remember this distinctly when gaotie was being set up.

The other key issue here is the stated aim of this rail project (to get people to TPE)–and the aim of selling real estate (and driving up priced in key spots) by putting stations everywhere. Let’s just say these two goals do not easily work hand in hand.

Anyone with more details? I would love to hear more from people who know what is going on.

Guy

Funny you should mention that. On the bus to the airport, I passed by a rail station that is visible from the highway and saw at least 5 new buildings going up around the area the station is in.

[quote=“nonredneck”][quote=“Abacus”][quote=“nonredneck”]

If they used a Japanese contractor, then how did they have all those electrical problems a year or two ago? Japanese are usually very good at quality and trying to avoid making mistakes, so I have to wonder who is actually doing the work.[/quote]

Great job stereotyping.

They might use a Japanese contractor but they didn’t import an entire work crew of 100’s or 1000’s to build it. And just because someone is Japanese doesn’t mean that they don’t make mistakes.[/quote]

Japanese are human, no disagreement there. They aren’t perfect, but they tend to plan better, try to avoid mistakes, and make their stuff last longer. Whereas Taiwanese just seem to throw stuff together with little planning (like how they built Taipei during the economic boom) Having to rip out the whole electrical system because of substandard wiring is something I would expect Taiwanese to do, but not Japanese. That is either a serious screw-up or some serious corruption on the part of the Japanese contractor. It can happen, but it’s not what I would expect.[/quote]
I met one of the Japanese engineers, a very nice fellow, and asked him in a friendly way how things were going with the project. Every trace of happiness vanished from his face. It seemed the most painful thing in the world for him to think about. “There are many problems.” :frowning: